Pot Filler Faucets

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by billybob, Apr 21, 2004.

  1. billybob

    billybob

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    I recently saw a cooking show and the chef had a faucet installed behind the stove to fill the pots on the stove instead of carrying the heavy pot to the stove. Has any one used a pot filler faucet or know where I can buy one? Are they hard to install? Are they worth it?
     
  2. suzanne

    suzanne

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    I don't have one, but I'd love to! If you make pasta a lot, and/or stocks, it is definitely worth it.

    The main installation concern is whether you have a water line passing by your cooking area (I assume you mean for home, yes?) If you do, it shouldn't be too hard -- just open the wall, tap into the pipe with the necessary leads and other piping, then close up the wall again. If you DON'T have water pipes right there, it's a BIG job ( = expensive) to bring over a new line. My guess is that any plumbing supply store would have the valves and piping you need. Foinding someone with the expertise to install it all is a bit more difficult.

    Remember, too, that once you're done cooking, you still have to empty the water somehow. Uh oh.
     
  3. billybob

    billybob

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    I just found some on ebay under delta pot filler faucet. I am putting one in next week.
     
  4. chef bubba

    chef bubba

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    I have to say that these faucets are really useful!! OH my aching back!!!
    LOL!!! Plumbing is really not hard at all if you can braze with a torch, flux and solder. Cosmetic work on the install is hardest imho. many how to books clearly explain how to add a faucet. Good luck, your back will thank you.
     
  5. jock

    jock

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    Just a word of caution:
    Residential stoves are not like commercial models (Duh!!) Your stove at home is typically plugged into an electrical outlet for lights, fans, glow switches, etc. whereas commercial stoves are not (they are usually hard wired.) Pot fillers are prone to leaking and can make a mess. At best it is just a mess, at worst there is the risk of electric shock or fire from short circuits.
    Be carefull.

    Jock