Portable Burners

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by icars, Jun 3, 2004.

  1. icars

    icars

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    I am starting to get more requests to do table side cooking when catering. I am looking for a portable burner solution. I have primarily been looking at gas burners. Does anybody have any suggestions?
     
  2. unichef

    unichef

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    The propane burners that use the cans work best.
     
  3. rickh

    rickh

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    I do believe you mean Butane. Propane is more of camping stuff that is NOT for indoor use. You can pick them up at AceMart for like $30 or so, $15 online, and if you want to pay $30 then you can get some very cool shapes for that price. The butane is not like in a lighter, its a can that looks like hairspray size and for the price and such it works well.
     
  4. campchef

    campchef

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    If you do a bit of searching, you can get butane burners in all kinds of colors and shapes. They work very well for table side. We use them for pasta bars, omelet stations and saute stations. I also use them for cooking demos. We even take them camping. Butane burns hotter and cleaner than propane.
     
  5. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    I use portable burners for demos at the market...there are some really cheap under $20 available at Asian markets with fuel at $1 a can....butane.
    They do not boil water....they take forever......
    There are some great ones but the price is exponential.....hotel supply house carries them.
    I use induction burners (they'll need electricity) for cooking classes with children and they crank.....oh my gosh they get really hot! but the kids can't burn themselves on the burner.....no open flame.
     
  6. chefboy2160

    chefboy2160

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    Shroomgirl, where do you get these induction electric burners? I have been useing the butane for almost 10 years now and man can they be tough to use and count on(depending on wind outdoors).Can you tell me where to purchase this electric induction goddess my love? Doug........
     
  7. campchef

    campchef

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    The main drawbacks of the induction burners are: You have to have electricity, and you have to have compatable cookware. Not just any cookware will work on an induction burner. I don't know what kind of butane burners you guys use, but mine rock! I boil 4 gallons of water in 15 minutes, use them to melt chocolate for the fountain, and I've never had a problem.
     
  8. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Ford Hotel Restaurant supply for induction, cast iron works on them....they are big bucks....but I love the heat.
    why tell you about the bad butane burners I'm using, tell us about your 4gl in 15 minutes version.....brand specifically. ;)
     
  9. campchef

    campchef

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    Glowmaster GM1300 about 7 or 8 years old. I keep it clean, keep the burner opened up all the way, and keep the air mixture just right for a very hot flame. I just love the things. I also have a couple GM1000s, but they just don't quite cut it like the 1300.
     
  10. chefboy2160

    chefboy2160

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    Thanks so much shroomgirl and campchef for the companies names.I will definately be checking them out.Doug............
     
  11. jim berman

    jim berman

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    The induction burner certainly have their pros & cons... namely...
    • They look pretty nice, versus the more 'rickety' look of the butane models
    • Their cook surface is completely flat and easily cleaned
    • They do, however, require special cookware and electricity... so mobility becomes an issue
    • The surface (some type of compound glass of sorts) has the tendancy to crack after reapeted use and is not fixable
    • They can be pricy... the Iwatani brand burner can run around $500 + versus the $15 butane burners
    Just my 2-cents.
     
  12. eatpaella

    eatpaella

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    Have you considered burners designed for Paella Pans? They are ultra portable, safe and easy to use and come in a range of sizes?
     
  13. washington678

    washington678

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    Thanks for the feedback. That is very useful.