porcelain Dutch oven?

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Joined May 20, 2019
My girlfriend has asked me for a meatloaf recipe. I found this.

She wants to go all out and make everything from scratch. Since there is only ultra pasteurized milk available on our island, I just ordered some buttermilk culture so she can make buttermilk.

Anyway, the recipe calls for high-quality bread, so I found this recipe.

Question #1.
For the meatloaf recipe, it calls for a 9x5 pan. We don't have one, so I started searching for one. Will this work?
Exoglass bread pan with stainless cover: 500 grams - 1 pound dough - 9.85 length X 2.95 height X 3.5 width top X 3.15 width base

I read that the most common size for loaf pans (meatloaf, bread, etc.) is 9x5, but I don't see that listed, so will this size work? Is it close enough?

Question #2.
For the bread recipe, it calls for a Dutch Oven. My girlfriend already has the 5.5q Staub Dutch Oven, but it doesn't fit in our Breville Air oven. Fortunately, we also have the Ulysses Deep Casserole with Lid here.

My question here is can this Ulysses be used for the bread recipe? Or does she need this? If both of those will not work, then how about this?

Thank you!
 
526
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
You can basically make a meatloaf in any pan, or even without one. A lot of it will just change cooking times and possible crust textures. You will have to make adjustments accordingly. As for the bread, I don't see why you can't use the dish you have. I'm not a professional baker so I can't attest to any variations on the crust but I've made bread before and didn't have any problems using what I had lying around.

Could just be the frugal side of me but I don't think you need to buy a new $200 dish to make a loaf of bread.
 
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Wholeheartedly agree with SF. In fact, a bigger and flatter baking pan is what I prefer. In a loaf pan the meatloaf often has a weird texture since it “boils in its fat”.

I applaud the notion of making all elements but I can’t see any value in baking bread just to make breadcrumbs. Bake the bread but eat it on the side or use for a leftover meatloaf sandwich!
 

phatch

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For the style of bread in that recipe, a heavy pot is necessary. Most any thick walled pot of any material with a lid will do, from any price point.
 
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Wow! I would have to sell that meatloaf for probably $30 to break even. Better be worth it.

Wholeheartedly agree with SF. In fact, a bigger and flatter baking pan is what I prefer. In a loaf pan the meatloaf often has a weird texture since it “boils in its fat”.
I don't even use a pan. I mix with my hands and beat it into a loaf. It goes into the oven on a bun pan with a rack with parchment paper under the loaf. I fold the parchment paper in half lengthwise and use scissors to make slits under where the loaf will be, then flatten it out. This allows the grease to drain through into the pan.

Takes me less than 10 minutes to make one.
 
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Joined May 20, 2019
Thank you for the feedback, but I have make sure I can I present a balanced front on this. I'm not a professional chef, so if there is pushback from her, it's either refer her to this thread (she won't come here) or get ready for a serious scolding.

For the style of bread in that recipe, a heavy pot is necessary. Most any thick walled pot of any material with a lid will do, from any price point.
Hmm, there are no weight dimensions listed for that Pillivuyt pan, but going off of the weight of the piece that we already own, which is pretty similar, I think that pan will not work as it is much lighter than the Staub coquette.

I'm not sure if anyone here owns the Emile Henry pan, and can confirm if it is heavy enough to use here.
 

phatch

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Don't worry about specific weight. Any thick walled oven safe vessel with a lid is fine. I use a non-stick aluminum pot for this often.

You're trying to create and contain steam for good oven spring and crust formation.
 
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Joined May 20, 2019
I can't tell if the Ulysses is thick walled or not. I just asked her and she said no. So, I guess I'm going to need to either call the company to inquire if the other Pillivuyt piece is thick walled OR buy the Emile Henry.

For the meatloaf recipe, it calls for a 9x5 pan. We don't have one, so I started searching for one. Will this work?
What is the consensus regarding this? Will the linked bread pan suffice for a 9x5 pan? Or should I look for a specific 9x5 pan?

It's only the two of us, so I'm not sure if the two inch difference is really a big deal. But she likes to follow recipes to the T and will be upset if things don't turn out correctly because I purchased her equipment with the wrong dimensions. From what I've researched that bread pan is one of the best you can buy, it has a lot going for it notwithstanding the dimension issue.
 
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If you get any pushback, remember these very important words, “yes, dear... as you wish.”
 
683
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Joined May 25, 2015
I think you are taking this way too seriously. This isn't rocket surgery, it's meatloaf!
 
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Joined May 20, 2019
halb halb - Please don't misunderstand me. I don't cook, I just eat. Therefore, my only desire here is to do what I'm told by the missus.

My main concern here is regarding the pieces the missus mentioned that she needs. That's all. She's a wonderful cook, so I don't complain a peep no matter what she needs or however expensive it is.
 
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Joined Sep 17, 2018
From your own recipe:

"Transfer the mixture to a 9- by 5-inch loaf pan, being sure that no air bubbles get trapped underneath. (You may have some extra mix, depending on the capacity of your pan; this can be cooked in a ramekin or free-form next to the loaf.) "

Based on this and personal experience your pan should be fine. Also if I am reading this right you are making the bread for two slices that go into the meatloaf? I understand the want to do everything from scratch but at this point I would just buy something. I mean if she is so set on making everything she might as well go forage the mushrooms, grow the vegetables and slaughter the meat as well.

My points come down to these:

1. Your pan for the meatloaf is fine.
2. I see no reason to buy a $200 dish to make a bread for two slices that go into a meatloaf.

Other than that it is up to you, and I guess if I had someone cooking all my meals for me I wouldn't really want to rock that boat either.
 

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