Please Help: My Almond Toffee issues

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by imar83, Jun 3, 2012.

  1. imar83

    imar83

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    Hello,

    I am making Almond Toffee at home and I am facing this issue that I wish that I can find a solution for, or at least have a scientific explanation of why it is happening.

    When I am done from cooking the Toffee and after the layers of chocolate has stiffen, I move the toffee to the freezer to be stored. When I get the Toffee out of the freezer, the color of it is light brown (Beige) and when eaten the texture of it is really great and do not stick to the teeth.

    But, when I leave it out for only 3 to 5 minutes, the color of the toffee starts to change to dark brown and it looks like it has started to melt. When eaten it does not have the great texture anymore and the toffee starts to stick to the teeth.

    The first explanation that came to my mind that the butter is causing this because it starts to melt, but what confuses me the most, is that I have once ordered Almond Toffee from Enstom's and it was shipped in relatively hot weather but when I have received it, it has maintained the brittly texture and its light color.

    I would be really happy if someone can solve this puzzle of mine.

    Thanks.
     
  2. pyrenees4u

    pyrenees4u

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    Hi,

    I would guess that you didnt cook your toffee long enough, did you use a candy thermometer?
     
  3. imar83

    imar83

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    Yes sure, I let the toffee reach the temperature of 145 degrees Celsius = 293 degrees Fahrenheit before removing it from heat.
     
  4. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Name
    TempDescriptionUsage
    Thread223-235* FThe syrup drips from a spoon, forms thin threads in waterGlacé and candied fruits
    Soft ball235-245* FThe syrup easily forms a ball while in the cold water, but flattens once removedFudge and fondant
    Firm ball245-250* FThe syrup is formed into a stable ball, but loses its round shape once pressedCaramel candies
    Hard ball250-266* FThe syrup holds its ball shape, but remains stickyDivinity and marshmallows
    Soft crack270-290* FThe syrup will form firm but pliable threadsNougat and taffy.
    Hard crack300-310* FThe syrup will crack if you try to mold itBrittles and lollipops
    Caramel320-350* FThe sugar syrup will turn golden at this stagePralines

    From the above, you may not be cooking to the correct stage, then again, I am NOT a candy maker /img/vbsmilies/smilies/crazy.gif
     
     
  5. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Just working off your description that when you shed residual heat quickly, you get a smooth candy; but when you don't you get grit...

    "Grit" is another way of saying "large sugar crystals," while "smooth" means "small crystals." The same phenomenon is also true for making ice cream where large ice crystals are the enemy, and the key to a creamy texture is how quickly you push the liquid to solid phase change. Toffee or ice cream, you want small crystals; and the quicker your sugar undergoes the phase change from liquid to solid, the better your texture will be.

    I think I'd try lowering the sugar temp by a couple of degrees in order do get a little more forgiveness. Another technique worth trying is pouring out onto a sheet pan set on a marble slab; or into a sheet pan set on an ice-filled sheet pan (the poor man's anti-griddle).

    While continual improvement is very nice, the good news is that you've developed a technique which works. If worst comes to worst and you don't get better, you're still sitting pretty.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2012
  6. imar83

    imar83

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    After I reach 145 degrees Celsius = 293 degrees Fahrenheit, the butter starts to smell and lots of vapors starts to emit from the Toffee, thats why I get kind of afraid that the Toffee will burn I remove it.How can I make it reach 300-310* F without burning the Toffee?
     
  7. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Bring it to the temp you want and then lower the temperature on the stove. You will reach that point without burning it.

    Petals.