Please help identify this vintage kitchen tool

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Ah ya know I didn't mean to pick on ya, I just don't think anyone would use a chincy alu connector for solid hardwood paneling and, really, who uses solid hardwood like that anyway?  I just brought up the hand punching to confirm my suspicion it was done that way.  And I say that handle is tapered, and that you also owe me one for supporting your panel connector "principle" (this one I believe has been taken beyond mere theory). ;-)~

Rick
 
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Well I ran it by the kid what you all said about it can't be a heatsink. Not enough fins, They are made to hold transistors and diodes and such. He looked at me and quietly said, Now this is him!!! not me!!! He said that you all need to stick to food. He told me he said it was old. No transistors or diodes. Said some have more fins and some less. He said there main function back then was to just dissipate heat. He said you will find them right behind an old power amp. He also said that at one time they were even experimenting with adding fans. Since the aluminum is conductive, that wood part could be cut from some type of frame to hold a fan.

He didn't come look at it again but said it was designed in quads. 4 of 1 shape and 4 of another to achieve more surface area. He also suggested that I should agree with everyone on what it is because it has  obviously been bastardized at some point so we'll never know. He said he will look for an identical one the next time he goes to storage.

On his way out he said he thought that 2 1/2 inches of wood would not qualify as a handle. maybe a holder to put the top in something.
 
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That was my bad. He didn't say it was before transistors and diodes. He just said that they weren't necessarily attached to the sink.

I'm not stickin up for the kid, but I did google what he said. 'Just go online and look for old aluminum audio heatsink'. We I did.

He said they would be attached to cool components.

I don't know enough about what he's referring to. So I'm still stumped.

https://www.google.com/search?q=old...X&ved=0CBwQsARqFQoTCILjqZnaycgCFUGPDQodSYkPlQ

I just caught him leaving to study and ran the link thing by him this morning and he said it will link once you post it. Here goes.

My 94 yr. old father decided to learn about computers. He is just learning how email works. So I emailed him a picture last night of the item and asked him what he thought it was.

I just got his answer. He said it reminded him of an old hobo stove (whatever that is)./img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif  I'm really excited for him learning about computers. He lives by himself and for years it's been nearly impossible for him to use a phone because of a major hearing loss. I know, way off topic.
 
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Both links work now, but nothing in any of them is anything like our panel connector here.

Rick
 
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phatch

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For a panel connector it has a lot of unfinished unsightly exposed corners. Why would a panel connector try to connect 8 panels in a star? I could see 2 connections in the same plane,, 90 degree corner, a variable corner or 4 right angles. This makes no sense as a panel connector.

I'm sticking with heat sink. That solid center would mount just fine on a chip surface.
 
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For a panel connector it has a lot of unfinished unsightly exposed corners. Why would a panel connector try to connect 8 panels in a star? I could see 2 connections in the same plane,, 90 degree corner, a variable corner or 4 right angles. This makes no sense as a panel connector.

I'm sticking with heat sink. That solid center would mount just fine on a chip surface.
All extruded pole connectors come with plastic top cap, side caps and bottom base as part of the same system, which will eliminate exposed corners.

If you go to the bottom diagrams in the link, you will see how the shape allows connecting flexibility.

dcarch
 
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I just wanted to say that I'm not disagreeing with anybody's opinion here. I just enjoy the challenge.

@dcarch. I'm familiar with what you're talking about. In fact i've seen quite a bit of that extruded aluminum in my sons shop. He used very similar products for the frame and rails

of his homemade CNC machine. He always reminds me it's a water jet cutter. I learned to TIG weld aluminum. Very cool !! Probably will never go back to a torch. I might just try to recreate the

piece just to remind me. If he ever finishes adding safety features for me.LOL . I know one day, one of us will find out what it is. 

Let's identify the wood. I will say, I think it's oak.

Also the quad thing. I'm not sure if it's the picture, but it appears the openings are different sizes. So if it's a connector, it would have 8 legs. 2 different kinds. No?
 
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My first job out of high school (back in the 60's ) was in the electronics industry. We used that exact same material so I can say it's definitely heat sink material. We got it in something like 3 foot lengths and cut it up. It's for use with stud mounted rectifiers or diodes. You drill and tap a hole in the center of the end and screw the diode into it.

I did a search for that material and had no luck finding that configuration today, probably because semiconductor packaging has changed so much since then. (Heat sinks come in an almost infinite number of shapes and sizes.) But that might give us a hint as to how old this thing is.
 
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For a panel connector it has a lot of unfinished unsightly exposed corners. Why would a panel connector try to connect 8 panels in a star? I could see 2 connections in the same plane,, 90 degree corner, a variable corner or 4 right angles. This makes no sense as a panel connector.

I'm sticking with heat sink. That solid center would mount just fine on a chip surface.
I'm afraid you are the only one not making sense here phatch, as this is a 4-panel connector, not an 8.  It has 4 pairs of mirror-image segments, exactly what you would see on such a connector attaching panels at 90deg.

HalB, the material used here is the same soft alu alloy (or zink if it is in fact heavier stuff) used to make all extrusions that have sharp corners, including heat sinks.  But this one is a 4-panel connector.

Rick
 
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so you're going to connect 4 legs and leave the other size 4 opening as design?
If you go to the link I posted above, look thru the material, you will see the design allows 90 degree connection, 45 degree connections or 135 degree connection. You will also see the similarities of post designs very similar to the item in question here.

dcarch
 
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" My first job out of high school (back in the 60's ) was in the electronics industry. We used that exact same material so I can say it's definitely heat sink material.

Sure, heat sink material is aluminum,  You can find a million things make with aluminum.

We got it in something like 3 foot lengths and cut it up. It's for use with stud mounted rectifiers or diodes. You drill and tap a hole in the center of the end and screw the diode into it."

I don't see how that can work with that shape. Assuming you cut the material in a 1/8 thick "disks",  that would leave you with very little fin material to radiate heat.

I did a search for that material and had no luck finding that configuration today,

You are not likely to find any, because it really does not look like it can work well for making heat sinks.

probably because semiconductor packaging has changed so much since then. (Heat sinks come in an almost infinite number of shapes and sizes.) But that might give us a hint as to how old this thing is.

Not much has changed in the science of heat sink design. The science is very simple and basic, just  aluminum with lots of fins. The only new heat sink design is in laptop computers. The CPU heat is conducted by a what's known as heat pipe, then radiated with a blower fan.

I have been playing with heat sink for many years. Here is part of my collection of various heat sinks.

dcarch

 
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 Sure, heat sink material is aluminum,  You can find a million things make with aluminum.
I don't see how that can work with that shape. Assuming you cut the material in a 1/8 thick "disks",  that would leave you with very little fin material to radiate heat.  
 You are not likely to find any, because it really does not look like it can work well for making heat sinks.
Really? Ok, so I guess having actually used the stuff was a figment of my imagination.
 Not much has changed in the science of heat sink design.
No, not in the science but it doesn't take a genius to realize the changes that have taken place in electronics since the 60's and that most of the stuff is no longer available. 
 
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@dcarch

I completely understand the information you're providing. You may also be the closest guess. After all, I think it's still a guess with the wood and all. I also looked closely at the connectors that are used to manufacture display booths in the diagrams.. The symmetrical ones with 8 slots did not seem to have different sizes like our tool. Just trying to discount your theory ;>)

Ok, say I come to the other side. If it is some type of connector, my theory is, it is a center connection for building a geodesic dome./img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif

oldmoldy3.jpg
 
 
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I don't see how that can work with that shape. Assuming you cut the material in a 1/8 thick "disks",  that would leave you with very little fin material to radiate heat.  
 You are not likely to find any, because it really does not look like it can work well for making heat sinks.
Really? Ok, so I guess having actually used the stuff was a figment of my imagination.

See my response above. Diodes, (after selenium rectifiers, which came with their own heat sinks) mostly came in fours for full wave bridge rectification. On a circuit board, four heatsinks will take up a lot of very expensive circuit board real estate.
 Not much has changed in the science of heat sink design.
No, not in the science but it doesn't take a genius to realize the changes that have taken place in electronics since the 60's and that most of the stuff is no longer available. 

True electronics have changed a lot, again, the basic design needs of heat sinks remain the same. It is all about surface area for heat dissipation. 

dcarch
 
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I think we do agree. You won't find that design today because it isn't very efficient and "real estate" is everything compared to what it was in the 60's. If you look at today's heat sink designs there is no doubt that many are computer generated to maximize efficiency. Back in the 60's we were lucky to have a calculator.
 
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Now back to cooking. What do heat sinks have to do with cooking?

I am interest in heat sinks because you may see in my collection of heat sinks, there are two for Peltier Junction devices. Attached to a cookware, It is capable of either keeping food cold or hot.

I mentioned "Heat Pipe", Heat pipe can make a very efficient heat conductor to heat up the inside of, say a turkey.

dcarch
 
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Now back to cooking. What do heat sinks have to do with cooking?

I am interest in heat sinks because you may see in my collection of heat sinks, there are two for Peltier Junction devices. Attached to a cookware, It is capable of either keeping food cold or hot.

I mentioned "Heat Pipe", Heat pipe can make a very efficient heat conductor to heat up the inside of, say a turkey.

dcarch
No, No, not back to food.  Explain the wood. If someone took the time to notch the aluminum to accept the wood, it has to have been made to do something specific.
 
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