pizza

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Joined Feb 4, 2005
Cuisinart CPS-445 Pizza Grilling Set, look at this to give making my own pizzas but are pizza stones really worth the money or would a convection oven be fine. It works for store bought pizza but what about dough you make your own. Should olive oil be added to the dough or after its made should it be set to rise in olive oil bath, seen one women who did it that way
 

kuan

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Joined Jun 11, 2001
Pizza stones are worth the money. Not only do you bake pizzas on the stone but it keeps your oven nice and hot after it's heated up.

As for pizzas, and styles, the sky's the limit. Olive oil? Sure. :) Slack dough Napoli style? Sure! Thick crust? Sure why not? NY style thin crust? Go for it!

Get the pizza stone, a good one, make sure it doesn't crack. You will be glad you did.
 
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First off, this website has WAY more info about everything pizza than you can absorb in a day or two.

https://www.pizzamaking.com/

Since my wife decided to go gluten free, don't make pizzas much anymore. But what I do when I do cook a pizza is put the pizza stone on a lower rack, and on a rack a couple inches above it put a clean, dry 12 inch cast iron skillet. They sit in a 500F oven for about half an hour at least while it heats up.

pie.jpg

Round is overrated.

mjb.
 
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Do you need to condition a pizza stone. Saw video said to wash in water and then brush in oil and let cook in oven 20 min for 450. What kind of oil, avocado, veggie my guess not olive oil.

How do you tell olive oil has turned, not sure what bad oil taste like and if turned can it make you sick
 
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Just remember i bought sunbeam pizza squares for my out door grill but never used, not sure if still have them since never used. The were 4 or 6 ceramic squares in metal you put them together but might be to big for my toaster oven
 
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If you make pizza just occasionally and don't want to store a stone, cast iron makes a pretty decent substitute.

We heat ours in the oven like you would a stone. If you have a pan already it can work, but the pizza has to be assembled in the pan so some speed and care not to touch the side are needed.

If you have a cast iron griddle, the pizza can be slid onto it like a stone. We have two griddles which works great for us since we do not agree on pizza toppings at all.
 
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Pizza addict here..
Have a very old "Old Stone Oven" 14x16 stone..it's starting to pit a bit lately.. :-(
Might be because I toss it in the oven (self cleaning setting) a few times a year..to burn off all the crap.
Typically use it on the BBQ @ ~525-550F, but it seems to work well in the new range now (& less propane tank fills).
Might consider a ceramic kiln shelf next time..at 1/2 the price.
Would never intentionally oil a stone..if you bring it up to 500F+, it's going to smoke & turn brown.
Just scrape it/brass brush it...I've never washed mine...
Try not to slop oil/cheese when moving it on/off the stone..it makes for a blackened stone & smokes a lot.
A good peel is hard to find! ..eventually made my own.
Coarse semolina (vs corn meal) for "ball bearings" when moving it around.
I try to use 00 flour, water, sugar, yeast & salt for dough..nothing else (other than a bit of oil for the proofing bowl & on the pizza itself)..the thin, crunchy w/edge bubble crusts are my fave.
Getting hungry..again! :)
 
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550 oven on a oiled heavy duty 1/2 sheet pan. I get 2- 12x13 pizzas from 1 lb of pizza dough. The pizza only takes 6 to 7 minutes to bake. I roll out thin and brush a thin layer of olive oil 1/4” on the edge of the dough. I happened to be making pizza when this post came out.
 

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Ex pro pizza maker here - I prefer corn meal over screens - just my preference. That said I'm from Detroit so I use a blue steel rectangular pan. I have several stones and before the I found the pan I used those exclusively. Get a good peel - I have a wood peel, dust it with corn meal, push, stretch and spin (yea I can still to that) your dough (I use store made dough $1/ea let it rise some) then build the pie on the peel before sliding it onto the stone. The corn meal acts like ball bearings. I recently found Cento whole peeled Italian plumb tomatoes for $1/15oz can. I crush those and salt to taste - done. Cheese and toppings are up to you.

In a Detroit style pie the toppings go on the dough, cheese goes on edge to edge and tomato sauce on top of that.
 
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youtube vid showed a place that put 24oz of cheese on a typical large pizza, then applied the sauce in a spiral.
 
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Cuisinart CPS-445 Pizza Grilling Set, look at this to give making my own pizzas but are pizza stones really worth the money or would a convection oven be fine. It works for store bought pizza but what about dough you make your own. Should olive oil be added to the dough or after its made should it be set to rise in olive oil bath, seen one women who did it that way
My baking stone stays in the over permanently! These stones are heavy duty and LAST! Mines just starting to show a crack after 12 years in the oven... https://bakingstone.com/shop/home_oven/

It is also great for free form loaves of bread, calzones... I use store bought pie dough and make a folded over mini pie that goes on it...

I use parchment under whatever I am cooking, makes sliding things off the peel effortless! Handles 550 oven temps just fine too.
 
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I am a big fan of the pizza stone and agree with mike9 mike9 about the cornmeal. I will also concur get a good peel, get your dough good and loose on peel, assemble pizza on peel, and slide on stone. Less mess = best. The one thing I will add is to really time your first spin to make sure no raw dough is still stuck to the stone.
 
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A much cheaper alternative to a "store bought" pizza stone are ceramic kiln shelves. The ceramic ones are good to cone 10 (2300+ F) depending on thickness. A 3/4" stone will last a long, long time. They come in a variety of shapes and sizes too, an average price for a 16"x18"x3/4" High Alumina stone is @ $35.
 
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