Pizza Sauce Packets

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by Andrew Bushard, Aug 12, 2019 at 2:05 PM.

  1. Andrew Bushard

    Andrew Bushard

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    Hi Everyone

    I am helping a friend opening a Pizza Restaurant. First issue we had to handle was a smokey conveyor oven. I think that's solved. Next we are hoping to develop a packet for the pizza sauce. The guy he bought the equipment from had a recipe, but I think it's a little bland. We want a solid recipe that we can premeasure into bags so the sauce is always consistent. We have a good start, but I was hoping to get ideas from you pro's out there.

    We plan to make the sauce up a day in advance and let it set in the frig. We are planning 4 cans #10 crushed tomatoes and 2 #10 cans of puree. What I am looking for here is your thoughts on the most important items in the sauce spice pack.

    Thanks in advance for any help
     
  2. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    1.) experience



    2.) the only spice I would use would be red pepper flakes

    3.) herbs if using, dried oregano and fresh basil
     
  3. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    The question I have is why would you want to store the sauce in "packets?"

    Pizza sauce in a busy pizzeria should be made fresh daily. In the event there is leftover sauce, it should be sealed tightly in a non-metallic container and stored in the cooler with the date it was made written on the container in bold writing for use the next day. I never used sauce stored for more than 48 hours.

    If your sauce is bland, try different tomatoes. I would suggest using whole, peeled plum tomatoes and puree them yourself. Plum tomatoes tend to have a better flavor and their acidity levels tend to be less harsh.

    From there, you can season the sauce any way you wish. I would recommend using fresh herbs whenever possible and add them when the sauce is nearly finished cooking. Crush and tear the herbs in your hands rather than cutting them. That tends to release more of the oils in the herbs and makes for better flavor.

    Use fresh garlic and do not let it sizzle in oil. When garlic sizzles, it can brown and turn bitter rather quickly ruining the sauce. Crush the garlic and then chop it. Like the herbs, this releases more oils and makes for better flavor.
     
  4. Seoul Food

    Seoul Food

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    I think he is saying he wants a spice packet to add to the sauce in pre-measured amounts like the little packet that comes with some corned beef you see in supermarkets during the holidays.
     
  5. halb

    halb

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    Don't know about you, but every time I make sauce I taste it and adjust my salt, maybe sugar and spices depending on what I taste. All tomatoes aren't created equal, even the same brand will have variations in acidity depending on where they were grown and the time of the year, weather, etc.

    From what you are saying, it sounds like this operation might be better off with an off the shelf canned pizza sauce.
     
  6. mike9

    mike9

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    The important thing with things like Pizza, Ribs, BBQ, etc. is consistency. If it's great it has to be great all the time, if it's mediocre it has to be mediocre all the time. I learned this as a young cook when the place I worked at had mediocre spaghetti sauce. I doctored it up and the owner came in one day and tasted it. He asked who made it - I said I did, he said it's quite good, but don't do that again.

    I think the "spice packet" is to insure that the sauce is the same every time "someone" makes it. You can source tomato products of the same brand for every delivery and I seriously doubt your average diner can tell one batch from another. It's the spice they are tasting.

    Ours used to be garlic salt, peperoncino, a bit of sugar and oregano - done. Measure your spices and write the quantities down till you get what you are looking for then burn the others that came before. Make a master copy and lock it up somewhere.
     
    fatcook likes this.
  7. jimyra

    jimyra

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    I would just use a ladle and train you staff how much to use. packets would be time consuming, added expense, and that little bit that's left in the packet adds up over time. Remember granulated garlic will gel overnight in the walk in.