Picking my first chef knife

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by leonid, Apr 22, 2015.

  1. leonid

    leonid

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    Hello all,

    I a home cook , till now i used simpe low cost knives in my kichen, now i decided it is a good time to get a good knife to work with.

    I spent a lot of time reading the forums here, wich are great i must say, and i came to this: Im looking for-

     Gyuto 7-8" made of stainless steel ,wich i will use for the long run as my main knife, my buget is aroud 150$,

    From what i learned there are a lot of overpriced knifes, and the most important is to hear the reviws of

    the users :)

    ill be glad to hear your advise -

    here is what i thought of:

    Kasumi 8"' (bit too expensive, but will be gald to hear your thoughts)

    http://www.chefknivestoyou.com/product/kasumi-damascus/88020.html

    Misono n112

    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SwedenSteelSeries.html#SwedenSteel

    Fujiwara FKM Stainless Gyuto 210mm

    http://www.chefknivestogo.com/fufkmgy21.html

    Kagayaki KG6

    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/KAGAYAKI.html

    Tenmi-Jyuraku GingamiNo.3 Series - TJ25G3

    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/Page4.html

    the last one cought my eye was the SETO I4 pro



    but i didnt see any good reiwes on it in those forums and ill be glad to know why 

    Ill be gald to read your replies and reviws,

    Thanks

    Leonid
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Hi @Leonid   welcome to cheftalk.  First comment, the Misono swedish is a great no nonsense performer, but it is NOT stainless.  You might be thinking of 19c27, that's a different swedish steel.

    Are you right handed?

    Do you have sharpening stones?  If you don't, plan to get some for these types of knives. 

    Don't get caught up in damascus cladding or super steels or any of that marketing stuff.   Good grinds are more important than anything else.

    Look into these:

    http://korin.com/Susin-Inox-Gyutou?sc=27&category=280068

    http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com...-yo-series/gesshin-210mm-stainless-gyuto.html
     
  3. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    The hiromoto you posted is good value too, but looks like out of stock in 210mm.  If you take the jump to 240mm you won't regret it.  210mm is too short sometimes. 
     
  4. rick alan

    rick alan

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    The Hiromoto and Geshin I'd say are about equal and better than your other picks.  You probably can't go wrong with either, but the Geshin will guaranteed be perfect, while the Hiromoto may have some FF or other issues, but you can ask Koki to check his stock beforehand.  If you talk to Jon at JKI he will tell you the exact differences of the 2.

    You still have to think about sharpening.

    Rick
     
    Last edited: Apr 23, 2015
  5. mhpr262

    mhpr262

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  6. leonid

    leonid

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    Im really gald with your replies guys! 

    I shortened my list to the following:

    Gesshin

    http://www.japaneseknifeimports.com...-yo-series/gesshin-210mm-stainless-gyuto.html

    Fujiwara FKM Stainless Gyuto 210mm

    http://www.chefknivestogo.com/fufkmgy21.html

    I do not see differences in stat or materials, cam anyone explain the 30$ difference in price?

    anoher thing-

    the last one cought my eye was the SETO I4 pro

    http://www.amazon.com/SETO-Japanese-Chef-Knives-Damascus/dp/B00BS2JQFE

    but i didnt see any good reiwes on it in those forums and ill be glad to know why (material, price looks good)

    Thanks,

    Leonid
     
  7. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Jon doesn't say what steel he uses, but I'd say it was aus-10.  Coming from Jon I believe everything about the knife will be a step above the Fujiwara.

    It is almost for certain the Seto is a cheap vg10 blade, Just as likely made in China as Japan, would not consider recommending it especially since it seems no one with any savy has ever purchased one, or even known anyone who has.

    Rick
     
  8. leonid

    leonid

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    Rick big thanks for the help!

    Btw im right handed, and i do have sharping stones (waterstones, king. 1000/6000)

    Ill contact Jon to check the metal.

    Best regards,

    Leonid
     
  9. jbroida

    jbroida

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    that particular gesshin stainless is aus-8 at about 58-59 hrc
     
  10. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Thanks Jon.  AUS-8 is of course the same steel as Fujiwara uses in their FKM, but quality of heat treat makes all the difference in the way a knife sharpens and wears.  Again I believe Jon's knife would be well worth the few extra dollars.

    Rick
     
  11. leonid

    leonid

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    Good morning guys, at least here in Israel :)  ...

    Again thanks for the replies.

    Mybe it is off topic , but as a newbe in the buisness i noted that almost no one talks about the heat tratment of the product,

    which is as important as the raw materials.

    I looked for lots of brands:

    JCK brands, Hiromoto, Kusumi , Shun, Seto, Global,  Mac ,siushin, Misono and a lot of others..

    I must admit that i feel i dont have the knowlge or information to pick the best combination of quality and price.

    So i can only count on your experiense and reviws.

    This knife im buying is for my 30 birthday.

    And after a  lot of thinking i decided to to put some extra money if needed, and to go for the desing that i like

    (i know it doesnt contrubute to the knife quality )

    Im intersted in damscus layered desing' her are my thoughts- Gyuto 210MM

    SAIUN Damascus Gyuto

    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SaiunDamascusSeries.html#Saiun

    SHIKI Tsuchime Damascus Series

    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/SHIKIDamascusSeries.html#SHIKIDamascusPremium

    Tenmi-Jyuraku Damascus Series

    http://www.japanesechefsknife.com/TenmiJyurakuDamascusSeries.html#Damascus

    What do you think? 

    Thanks,

    Leonid
     
  12. benuser

    benuser

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    From those, I would certainly choose the Hiromoto, as its maker, Mr Nagao, is a very serious guy and most competent regarding heat treatment.
    That being said, I wouldn't ever buy a Damascus layered blade. It does not contribute in any way to its performance -- in fact, it makes the blade thicker. After a few months of use it looks far from appealing, and above all, it makes thinning to be followed by refinishing and reetching. Most of the Damascus blades have a VG-10 core and I don't like sharpening it. It takes much more time than other good stainless blades of Gingami-3 or different Sandviks.
    I would have a look at the various Misono series and at the remaining Hiromotos.
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2015
  13. kevpenbanc

    kevpenbanc

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    Hi Leonid,
    I have one of the shiki and the hiromoto that you linked to, both petties. I have no complaints about either, would recommend the hiromito due to the nicer damascus.
    The hiromoto was the only knife I've bought that was not particularly sharp ootb, but a quick session on the stones put a stinky edge on it.
    I've not has Benusers negative experience with damascus. My shiki is a bit scuffed due to newbie sharpening experiments and adventures a while back. But the other knives I bought are pretty much the same as when I bought them. Some have had fairly heavy use over 2 years - I just took more care of them than I did of the shiki.
    Cheers
    Kev
     
    Last edited: Apr 28, 2015