Phone rights...

5,331
799
Joined Oct 10, 2005
So yesterday my boss comes in to work, asks me if I had done “x” yet, I reply negative, then tells me to drop everything and do “x”, and was in a snarly, p*ssy mood the whole day. It was only this evening when I turned on my phone did I see that he texted me 10 minutes before he came in to start with “x”. My shift starts at 4 am and ends at 12, my phone is either at home, or if I do bring it with me is in my locker. Other staff leave me notes on my clipboard to pull this, turn on that etc., which I have no problems with.

Thing is, I never gave him my number, he was not present at my interview, nor at my trial, and it was pretty clear he made no effort to even glance at my resume. So I don’t know where he got my number from.

By now it should apparent that I hate, loathe, detest, etc. those $&)’ -Ing things, and the only reason I have one (pay as you go, p.o.s brick phone) is that three potential employers looked at my phone number on my resume, asked me if it was a landline, then drew the conclusion that I was either homeless or some kind of criminal living in a halfway house.

Ok, so at my new job I have no subordinates, don’t deal directly with the sales girls in the office, can’t order supplies, and most definitely have no contact with clients.
So my question is : do I have a right to expect NOT to be contacted by my boss via MY phone? I’m there 8-9 hours a day, it’s common procedure (even before I started there) to leve notes or to verbally communicate.

Thoughts?
 
627
230
Joined May 25, 2015
I find this interesting since most places prohibit cell phone use during working hours which I see that you agree with. So here we have this guy who expects you to monitor your phone for his texts. How about you start carrying it and have your friends text you all day interrupting your work. When he says something just say "I thought it was you".
 
3,073
564
Joined May 5, 2010
Haha....Or........Have a talk with boss and tell him you don't carry a cell phone with you at work. Simple as that.....hopefully......
And for the record, I detest my cell phone and where I live make me have a land line in order to have cell coverage.
 
2,356
663
Joined Feb 8, 2009
In todays world you need to be "with it" when your with the "with it's"...... if you're "without it" with the "with it's" then you're "out of it" ....... Turn on your phone and get "with it" ......If you don't go with the flow, it will be like the only person Ice fishing with shorts and an Aloha shirt while everyone else wearing winter coats.

I think this is more of you just wanting to do a good job in a kitchen and not have any responsibility in management. I understand that, but in order to do that there is some shit that comes along with it. The shit being working and taking orders from some people who you may think as A-holes......I realized many years ago I couldn't work in a kitchen unless I had some say-so on what when on. I Volunteered at our local homeless mission for Thanksgiving dinner prep. I asked who was in charge and started peeling potatoes. Two hours later the head guy walked up to me and said, it looks like you know more about this than I do, it's all yours. I never said a word about what I did or criticized anything. Needless to say I took the wire whip and ran with it. From that day on I knew I could never be an employee again. I also never peeled potatoes again. I also ran a few homeless feeding after that. There is no going back, unless you work by yourself and leave when everyone else comes in... ChefBillyB
 
969
569
Joined Mar 1, 2017
This is a simple matter of communication (no pun intended). You and this guy are not on the same page in terms of how to communicate. This requires a simple conversation that hopefully will end with a mutual understanding of how to the two of you will communicate with one another moving forward.

You hate cell phones. I'm with you on that one. I did not allow cell phones in my kitchen. Its too tempting of a distraction and I do not need to explain how a distracted employee in a kitchen can be a dangerous thing.

Do you need to "get with it" and start carrying your phone while at work? That remains to be seen and will depend on the outcome of your conversation with your boss. Perhaps not. Who knows? However, its probably beneficial to mention how you feel about cell phones, especially at work, and suggest another method of communication.

Who knows? He may be good with whatever you suggest. The important thing is to open up and maintain a good line of communication with your boss so that in the future, both of you can feel comfortable and freely discuss the dynamics of your professional relationship.

Good luck! :)
 
5,331
799
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Thanks for the replies. Just for the record, I am currently Not in a management position, and the pay rate reflects that.

O,k. Let’s say I “get with it”, and carry that ( deleted) thing with me everywhere. Do I respond to texts and calls when I’m in bed with my wife? Do I immediately pull over and respond when Im driving? I can carry it with me at work, but why bother texting me if I’m right there?

At this point I’d like to mention that I quit a previous, well paying job after the fourth time the Chef called me up in the evenings drunk/sh*tfaced with useless chatter.

I dunno, if you want to get a hold of me 24/7 you either have to be a very close family member, or pay me a lot more....
 
969
569
Joined Mar 1, 2017
Unless you're on call and required to answer when off work, the answer then is No. If you get texts etc while off work, you can respond to them the next time you're on shift. :)
 
1,658
179
Joined Dec 23, 2004
I would have a talk with the Chef (or whatever his official title is). Maybe just tell him you were never told that you were expected to use for cell phone for work communications. Again, how did he even get your number? Seems like it would be good to get out a head of this one.
 
2,356
663
Joined Feb 8, 2009
I'm running a business that happens to be one of the hardest businesses to be successful. Everyone wants more hours and then they all call in sick of have something better to do at least once a week.
That be said and what was done in the old school of management. If a person didn't answer their phone they may not be on the schedule very much longer. Just sayin'
 
399
119
Joined Feb 18, 2007
He texts you before he comes in, not when your shift started, correct? How long did he wait to come into the kitchen to ask you if you had gotten his text (how observant is this guy who doesn't notice you don't have a phone on you?) or check on whether or not you had any questions about what he asked you to do? Seriously, I have my doubts about this guy already and it's only been, what - a week now? two at the most. He's the new sheriff in town and hasn't told the staff what his expectations are?

Did the company ask you for your cell phone number at any point during the interview process or when you started? Or is it the phone number on your resume?

Most of "my chefs" - at the accounts we serve - have my cell phone which I have on me at all times in case of an emergency. There's *always* an emergency during wedding season and texting is the way these guys stay in touch when email would take too long...... but we've had that conversation and know what to expect. That chef hasn't, and you don't..... :rolleyes:
 
1,658
179
Joined Dec 23, 2004
That be said and what was done in the old school of management. If a person didn't answer their phone they may not be on the schedule very much longer. Just sayin'
Speaking of old school, back in the day if I saw a cook on his cell phone that phone went back to his car or into my desk til the day was done. It was rarely seen a second time and never a third.
 
5,331
799
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Chefbillyb times have changed. All the websites are full of employers looking for cooks, and most of them are guaranteeing 36+ hrs/ week, on call is long gone. Most catering co’s Use a web format that emails out a quest for cooks, chefs, bartenders, etc, begging, pleading you to sign up for gigs two and three weeks away.

J cakes, the”boss” is in charge of the baking dept, four staff including myself, and no the guy isn’t very observant, doesn’t communicate well, other staff avoid talking to him, and he avoids talking at all.

I dunno, I’m tired of working short stints, even though I have good reason to leave. Every place has issues, so I might as well stick this one out, because it’s as good as any other place.
 
1,760
496
Joined Aug 15, 2003
I have a pretty liberal cell phone policy. Cell phones are ubiquitous, literally almost everyone in developed and developing world has one. My opinion is that they are nearly impossible to police, if you "ban" cell phones, then people are just going to get sneaky and try and hide it...take 20 minute bathroom breaks, sneak around, etc.

I've never really understood the issues some chef's seem to have with them. I treat my cooks like professionals...I expect them to act professionally, do their work effectively, communicate directly, show up on time, follow through, be set up on time consistently, all that stuff. I try my best to hold them accountable for all this stuff. If they abuse the system, then I'll talk to them. But really, if one of my cooks steps out of the kitchen to take a quick phone call about something important, or takes 15 seconds to return a text during prep time...do I really care? Why would that bother me? Assuming of course, the cook is otherwise in good standing and is doing the other things I expect from them.

I dunno, if you want to get a hold of me 24/7 you either have to be a very close family member, or pay me a lot more....
I've never understood language like that because we all have full control over whether we answer the phone....hell, turn it off. My dad used to say stuff like that and I was always incredulous...
 
1,658
179
Joined Dec 23, 2004
I can't speak for foodpump but read the part you quoted. Sure, you can just not answer the phone but the trend seems to be (at least in some fields) for the boss to expect you to be available for communications all the time. That's something I feel needs a pushback. We're not curing cancer here, we're cooks. Yeah, if someone calls in sick or no-calls you need to cover; no harm in calling me to ask. But calling on my vacation, in the middle of the night, on all my days off, etc isn't something I would simply accept.

As for phones at work, obviously I've relented (or at least caved to the inevitable). It's good to treat your staff like professionals, and hell maybe you've even been lucky enough to have them behave that way. I recall an Exec job a few years back where I inherited a Sous that would play Clash of Clans and Candy Crush on the line...during the rush. This wasn't a greasy spoon but one of the better restaurants in the state. I changed the culture to one of working and accountability but it's an uphill battle for lots of reasons.

To Foodpump- sadly in most cases you either have to accept bad management or take a management job.
 
399
119
Joined Feb 18, 2007
What I frustrates me is their need to constantly check the phone - you can wait until you are finished with what you are doing to answer that text. I see staff looking at their phone while they are stirring something, or whipping cream, whatever it is that takes their eyes off of their task - and that's when problems happen - the cream is overwhipped, or boils over. If your child's school is calling because there's a problem, yes I understand; take the call. Have someone cover what you're doing at the moment. I don't tolerate avoidable mistakes because you want to check your text messages or look something up on Google that everyone was just chatting about. You're being paid to work; not be on the phone. The time adds up to more than what they think is a "break".

When I need to get in touch with staff on off days/after hours to ask where something is or confirm that something was packed to send out, yes I will text them and I always preface it with "sorry for the interruption, we need to know where the panna cotta is for X". I don't make a habit of it. If we weren't looking for whatever it was that they had done, I wouldn't have to text at all....
 
1,760
496
Joined Aug 15, 2003
I can't speak for foodpump but read the part you quoted. Sure, you can just not answer the phone but the trend seems to be (at least in some fields) for the boss to expect you to be available for communications all the time. That's something I feel needs a pushback. We're not curing cancer here, we're cooks. Yeah, if someone calls in sick or no-calls you need to cover; no harm in calling me to ask. But calling on my vacation, in the middle of the night, on all my days off, etc isn't something I would simply accept.
I understand all that, but the issues you speak of don't have anything to do with cell phones...a boss expecting you do be available for communication all the time is the boss's problem, not the cell phone. How did people deal with this stuff before cell phones? Surely you didn't/wouldn't answer every single phone call that came into your house...you'd decide if/when you were available and adjust.

Calling someone in the middle of the night is inappropriate (unless an emergency, obviously), and has always been inappropriate, regardless if the phone was a cell phone or a land line.

Lack of boundaries are clear, but it should be a relatively easy fix.
 
627
230
Joined May 25, 2015
What I frustrates me is their need to constantly check the phone - you can wait until you are finished with what you are doing to answer that text. I see staff looking at their phone while they are stirring something, or whipping cream, whatever it is that takes their eyes off of their task...
The issue for me is that cell phones have become an addiction for most people. As soon as they receive a text or call they are psychologically compelled to respond no matter what they are doing. The only way to stop that behavior is to take the phones away from them.

I understand all that, but the issues you speak of don't have anything to do with cell phones...a boss expecting you do be available for communication all the time is the boss's problem, not the cell phone.
It does when the boss is addicted. Somebody need to take his phone away too.
 
5,331
799
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Well... I guess there are two issues here, the first being privacy and expectations of not being on-call 24/7. The second is addiction, and in this case it’s phone addiction.

Phone addiction is pretty easy to control in a kitchen, just as alcoholism is pretty easy to control in a kitchen: Don’t drink at work, whatever you do on your own time is your own business, but you are expected to show up at the scheduled time and complete your duties. If you can’t do that, get your alcohol addiction under control and don’t come back until you do.
With phones it’s simple: The phone stays in your locker, what you do on your lunch break or coffee break is your business, but the phone goes back into the locker at the end of the break. We are not in sales, and we use the company phone to place orders. If you can’t go 2-3 hours without using your phone, you have an addiction problem, so don’t come back into the kitchen until you have this under control.

In order not to single anyone out, everyone in the kitchen follows the same rule.
 
1,658
179
Joined Dec 23, 2004
Yeah, people forget now but there was a time when people went hours, all day even, without once touching a telephone. We seem to have this feeling now that it's the 11th amendment to the Bill of Rights that you're able to randomly check your texts all day.
 
62
7
Joined May 1, 2019
So yesterday my boss comes in to work, asks me if I had done “x” yet, I reply negative, then tells me to drop everything and do “x”, and was in a snarly, p*ssy mood the whole day. It was only this evening when I turned on my phone did I see that he texted me 10 minutes before he came in to start with “x”. My shift starts at 4 am and ends at 12, my phone is either at home, or if I do bring it with me is in my locker. Other staff leave me notes on my clipboard to pull this, turn on that etc., which I have no problems with.

Thing is, I never gave him my number, he was not present at my interview, nor at my trial, and it was pretty clear he made no effort to even glance at my resume. So I don’t know where he got my number from.

By now it should apparent that I hate, loathe, detest, etc. those $&)’ -Ing things, and the only reason I have one (pay as you go, p.o.s brick phone) is that three potential employers looked at my phone number on my resume, asked me if it was a landline, then drew the conclusion that I was either homeless or some kind of criminal living in a halfway house.

Ok, so at my new job I have no subordinates, don’t deal directly with the sales girls in the office, can’t order supplies, and most definitely have no contact with clients.
So my question is : do I have a right to expect NOT to be contacted by my boss via MY phone? I’m there 8-9 hours a day, it’s common procedure (even before I started there) to leve notes or to verbally communicate.

Thoughts?
To be fair we are in a technological revolution .. all my bosses contact each other via email, text and or phone call.. we also leave notes.. you should take your phone w/ you i do not see the harm if you are not using it recreationally.
 
Top Bottom