Pheasant suprême with chanterelles, braised Belgian endives, Vitelotte purple potato and a sauce bas

Discussion in 'Recipes' started by chrisbelgium, Dec 8, 2013.

  1. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Pheasant suprême with chanterelles, braised Belgian endives, Vitelotte purple potato and a sauce based on Pineau des Charentes

    Another experiment that we enjoyed. Work needs to be done on the plating!

    - Started by cleaning the chanterelles and set all trimmings aside, they will go in the sauce.

    - make the sauce; sweat a shallot, add Pineau des Charentes and white wine, reduce slowly until syrupy, add chicken stock and the chanterelles trimmings, a few Szechuan pepper corns, reduce. To be finished later on.

    - braise the Belgian endives; sear first in butter on medium low fire, s&p & nutmeg, add water (a finger high), cover with a cartouche cut from parchment paper; put cartouche on top of the endives, put also the lid on the pot/pan. Let braise on low fire. 30 minutes later; remove lid and cartouche, let braise further uncovered until all remaining moist is gone (turn endives often now!) and the endives taste nicely bitter-sweet.

    - Vitelotte purple potatoes; boil in salted water with a few unpeeled cloves of garlic. Peel while still very hot, add a drizzle of olive oil, s&p and keep warm. Keep the garlic that now is soft and mild in taste; it will go with the chanterelles.

    - Panfry the pheasant suprêmes in a medium-hot pan; put them in the hot pan for 4 minutes and don't touch them at all, nor the pan. Turn, s&p and let fry this side also for 4 minutes. Turn and add s&p. Wrap loosely in alu-foil to rest and keep warm. Discard the fat from the pan and add the Pineau sauce you made earlier to deglaze. Return the sauce to the sauce pan.

    - Finish the sauce; add a small chunk of cold butter and swirl the pan until butter is dissolved. Add juices that came from the suprêmes, stir. Sieve (press all juices out!) and keep warm.

    - Fry the chanterelles in olive oil/butter, add the peeled garlic cloves that had been cooked with the potatoes and crush the garlic in the pan. Taste, s&p.

    - Plate

     

     
  2. soesje

    soesje

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    sounds nice, chris!!!

    have you considered making the potatoes into a type of tartlet like pommes anna or similar?

    will make better plating.

    also, using rimless plates (or a bigger plate the size of the one you are using, adding rim) will make it look better too.

    also, when taking pics, less is more….. smaller portions.
     
  3. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Thanks for the advice Soesje, the whole presentation is such a mess but the taste was excellent. Such a shame part of the fun was eliminated by throwing it all on a plate like that. I very much agree that putting too much on a plate doesn't work at all. And yes, the potatoes are too much present.

    Now I'm going to look for plates without a rim; sounds like a very good idea!
     
  4. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    My kind of cooking.  :)
     
  5. soesje

    soesje

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    chris, in most upscale restaurants at least here, they use rimless plates.  or VERY big plate WITH rim.

    depends on the dish. 

    worth experimenting with. I have seen it done in where I work now with new dishes and it makes all the difference.

    (for your information, look up restaurant 1910 eindhoven)
     
  6. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    @kuan; thanks!

    @soesje; I know, most restaurants use plates without a rim, often very expensive pieces!

    I'm looking for white rimless plates that aren't too large. Oversized and square plates aren't my thing at all. I do believe that good portioning is the best way to dress a plate and that's were my plating went wrong.

    I found this picture on a Belgian website that more or less demonstrates the difference in correct plating in both plates with and without a rim;

    (found this picture at http://tafelvooreen.blogspot.be/)

     
    Last edited: Dec 10, 2013
  7. soesje

    soesje

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    chris, I totally see your point and  agree on the pics but do you know the size of the plates ??? ;) 

    also, one at left seems to be a starter and the other a main? might just be me.
     
  8. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    It's difficult to estimate how large those plates are. Today we were in Sluis, you know, Zeeuws-Vlaanderen, home for only a little while more of Sergio Herman's "Oud Sluis" restaurant before he moves to Antwerp to start from scratch in his new place.

    In one of the shops I noticed nice plates, exactly what I wanted; nice price, white, no rim and 31 cm diameter. Only problem; they had only 1 plate left... aaarrrhhh! Ah well, I know other good sources, maybe it's a good argument to visit Sluis again in the near future.
     
  9. soesje

    soesje

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    of course I know sergio herman ;) 

    but as for plates my tip is to go to an ISPC/ HANOS if you have got a card (or know someone who's you could borrow…) for plates.

    lots of choice.