Personal chef contract: How do I go about it?

2
0
Joined Jan 13, 2021
Hi everyone,

I work as a personal chef, I go to clients homes to cook or in my kitchen and just deliver. However, I recently thought to myself, I don't want to do it alone... I want to bring in other professional chefs and at least 1 Nutritionist/dietitian to work with me. So in a case where I'm booked and another client needs a personal chef service, the other professional chefs can do the job and vice versa. Also, if a client wants a particular cuisine made which either me or the other chef is unable to make, we can swap places. Bottom line is we shouldn't lose a good business, so where 1 person is lacking, another is really great at. That way we all work together as a team and make this money. The Nutritionist will also make money through clients consultation sessions...

Now my dilemma is this;
How do I draft out a partnership agreement that's beneficial for us all? The way I see it, it will be 2 chefs (me and 1 other person), 1 dietitian/nutritionist and maybe a fitness trainer as well.

Since the business will be in my name, do we spilt the proceeds by percentage? Say for instance, I get a job a day I wont be available, and I pass the offer to chef B, if she's game, do I like charge 5% of the money? Same goes for the Nutritionist, a client calls in to make an appointment, Nutritionist is available, date is fixed, Do I charge 5% of the consulting fee as well?
Anyone have an idea how this is supposed to work? Please help☹
 
1,196
735
Joined Mar 1, 2017
The short answer is you don't. You spend the money and hire an attorney to put together an agreement that addresses the following subjects:

1. Compensation;
2. Responsibilities and duties;
3. Liabilities;
4. Capital contributions/Capital call;
5. Additions/Removal of Members;
6. Voting interests (You always want to retain control with at least 51%)
7. Dissolution and "wrap up" of the partnership.

Yes, hiring a lawyer to handle this may cost money. However, it is the best money you will ever spend. Furthermore, a lawyer can counsel you on other possible business arrangements that are less complicated and more flexible than a partnership agreement.

Good luck :)
 
2
0
Joined Jan 13, 2021
The short answer is you don't. You spend the money and hire an attorney to put together an agreement that addresses the following subjects:

1. Compensation;
2. Responsibilities and duties;
3. Liabilities;
4. Capital contributions/Capital call;
5. Additions/Removal of Members;
6. Voting interests (You always want to retain control with at least 51%)
7. Dissolution and "wrap up" of the partnership.

Yes, hiring a lawyer to handle this may cost money. However, it is the best money you will ever spend. Furthermore, a lawyer can counsel you on other possible business arrangements that are less complicated and more flexible than a partnership agreement.

Good luck :)
Oh wow. Thank you
 
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