Payard pear tart

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by alexia, Sep 10, 2002.

  1. alexia

    alexia

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    Has anyone used the Payard cookbook? How dependable have you found his recipes?

    I made some beautiful pears poached in red wine and am planning to use them in Payard's Bourdaloue Tart. (I like the idea of using an almond cream beneath the custard and pears.)
     
  2. w.debord

    w.debord

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    I've worked out of his book. Probably 12 or so items and found all of them to rank as "very good" to "excellent" except 1 (his chocolate coconut cake) which I should have known. I'd say that's a darn good average...I wouldn't hesitate at all in following any of his recipes!
     
  3. alexia

    alexia

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    Thanks Wendy. I'm in the process already, and it's encouraging to know it will be worth the effort. I love the result of these multi-part confections, as long as I can stage the elements over several days.
     
  4. isa

    isa

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    I often make almond pear tart but I never added a custard to it, I'll be curious to have your opinion on Payard's tart. :lips:
     
  5. alexia

    alexia

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    Well, Isa, I'm curious, too. :)

    I've managed to erase from my computer how many eggs to use for the custard. My memory tells me one, but I doubt that would be enough. I must have done it when I went over the recipe to make my shopping list! I'm hoping that Wendy has the Payard cookbook handy to check it for me. (Otherwise I'll wing it, though I like to follow a recipe exactly the first time - unless someone else comes to the rescue).

    Everything else is ready to be baked tomorrow.
     
  6. alexia

    alexia

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    A great big thanks, Wendy, for coming through with the number of eggs.

    The tart was excellent and I can recommend it. Though it is a bit of work, each element is simple enough. When I checked tarte Bourdaloue on Google, all recipes for it only had the frangipane and pears. I think Payard's addition of the custard gives the tart more subtlety.

    I used pears that I had poached in red wine. Payard suggests poached or CANNED (!) pears. I think the acidic element added by poaching the pears is better than using pears that are simply sweet. Also, the deep red color was beautiful.

    I'm certainly going to try some more of Payard's recipes.

    But first I have a lot of almond cream to use up.
     
  7. w.debord

    w.debord

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    Thanks for telling us your results! It always fun to hear back info....


    Mr. Payard isn't some fly by night newbie.....He's DARN GOOD! I'm certain you'll like most of the items from his book. At the very least I think they all work, everything else is just a matter of your tastes.

    You know I've seen other French pastry chefs say you could use canned pears too. I suppose if you were in a huge rush, but I agree with you....canned ones just can't compare to your own poached pears. I've did use them once and you couldn't even taste what the fruit was.

    To use up the rest of your frangipane you could make that same tart with different fruits, plums, apricots, figs, etc.....well anyway he has several other recipes thru his book with his frangipane. Keep us updated on your adventures, please?
     
  8. alexia

    alexia

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    Wendy, you are so right. Payard's pastries are wonderful. I've had a few of them. The bakery is a convenient distance from the Met, so I can combine two of my favorite arts.

    Making great pastries or food doesn't always translate into making reliable recipes, however, so I wanted some feedback on that before doing a four part tart. No single part of the process was difficult. For me the greatest impediment to taking on these more complex recipes is a bad back that interfers with standing too long, so I stage them out over a few days.

    I found the same issue when using Silverton's "Desserts." Many of these wonderful chef's recipes are so wonderful precisely because they include several elements that play against each other in taste and texture. I make some of these a day or two before the final assembly or baking. When making something that can be frozen or kept refrigerated, I make extra.

    What's most wonderful though is to be able to draw on the knowledge, experience, and library of the talking chefs here - and to share my own with others. :bounce:
     
  9. isa

    isa

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    Thanks Alexia, after reading your description, I'll just have to try it, it sounds so good. :lips:


    P.S. Did the red wine poached pears discoloured the filling?
     
  10. alexia

    alexia

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    No, that was the beauty of it, the red pear fans made a dramatic contrast with the filling. You might want to consider a pale red wine or steeping them more lightly - as mine were so red as to be almost purple. I didn't even need to glaze them for them to glisten. (I reduced the wine a bit before poaching and then reduced it some more while I baked the pie to form a sauce that decorated the plate very attractively. I would consider creme fraiche if I could justify any more cholesterol.
     
  11. isa

    isa

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    Thanks Alexia, I can't wait to try it.