Patina--Force it or let come naturally?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by sal paradise, Feb 27, 2016.

  1. sal paradise

    sal paradise

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    I have just ordered my first Carbon blade -- a 240 Misono Sweden -- and I'm curious about caring for this knife, specifically preventing rusting and reducing reactivity with foods.  So I guess those things are related to forming a patina.

    My question(s):

    Should I force a patina right away, using mustard or vinegar or similar?

    Should I let it form naturally, but maybe help it along by slicing  a few pounds of onions/potatoes/other cheap produce?

    Some other option?

    I am now a home cook, so I do not have easy access to 50# bags of onions anymore.  Oddly mixed emotions about that...
     
  2. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Option #2
     
  3. ordo

    ordo

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    Better see how it reacts to a natural patina. Use it, wash it, dry it carefully (the tang also).

    There's a beautiful wabi-sabi mistic in building natural patinas.
     
  4. foody518

    foody518

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    Congrats on the new knife! Post up patina pictures of whichever path you choose :D
     
  5. benuser

    benuser

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    Congratulations! That Misono was my first Japanese carbon as well, and I still love it.
    I've mostly forced a patina on my Misonos in order to control the process a bit. You may as well follow an intermediate route by waiting a bit before cleaning the blade after use. But make sure to clean the very edge, e.g. by cutting very lightly in a cork. Otherwise the oxidation will dull the edge.
    Anyway, rinse with a lot of very hot water.
    What brings me to say something about a Misono particularity, i.e. its factory edge. Very polished and overly convexed by buffering, and relatively weak.
    The Swedish Carbons sharpen very easily, but you can't follow that factory edge.
    Please be aware that the blade is strongly right-biased with its edge and axis strongly off-centered to the left. If you sharpen it for the first time, I would suggest you to keep the convexity of the right bevel and put a straight left bevel on it. Let us know, there are some tricks you may want to use.
     
  6. sal paradise

    sal paradise

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    Thanks Ben. I do plan to try to open up the knife pretty much right when I get it. I'm a bit of a novice sharpener, though. I know the basics (I think), more or less, but any tips related to the misono would certainly be appreciated.
     
  7. benuser

    benuser

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    Sure, Sal, let us know.
     
  8. ordo

    ordo

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    This is a very good advice. I adopted it.
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2016
  9. mike9

    mike9

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    It's hard to beat a good looking mustard patina - check out Michael Rader's mustard kissed blades.  Interestingly I find slicing rare red meat to really hasten the job too as well as onion and ripe red bell peppers.  Cabbage too come to think of it.  
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2016
  10. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    I've never forced a patina, but I just bought a used knife that had one forced.

    Option #1 and #2 side by side


    Bottom line do what you want :)
     
  11. mike9

    mike9

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  12. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    Not my handywork.  I never got the curved handlemaking skills down.  I just make simple shapes!  This one you'll notice is the same suien vc but the profile is flatter than the original on the right. 
     
  13. foody518

    foody518

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    That patina thread is one of my favorites :)

    That new (used) Suien looks great!
     
  14. sal paradise

    sal paradise

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    I didn't force a patina...but I have been slack about wiping it down right away and is picking up some pretty cool patterns from things like onions and peppers that have clung to the blade for a few minutes.


     
  15. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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  16. eve12

    eve12

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    Is it possible to remove a forced patina that has been done on a knife from a while ago? I've just been wondering about this. 
     
  17. benuser

    benuser

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    Sure. Any abrasive. Think coarse ScotchBrite. But perhaps someone has a chemical instead of a mechanical solution.
     
  18. eve12

    eve12

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    Thanks for the quick response. Yeah, I wonder if baking soda would work as well.....
     
  19. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Last edited: Jan 28, 2017
  20. eve12

    eve12

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    That's beautiful! He has obviously taken the time to apply the mustard. He must have some talent in art to do that.

    Looks really cool.