pastry school in Europe.

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Joined Dec 5, 2015
Hi

Today im a chef and been for 2 years but want to change and become a pastry chef so im looking for a school where I can learn from basic to high end. Because its much money I want to chose the right school so I don't just waste money.

Im looking at le cordon bleu in London, Ferrandi in Paris and paco torreblanca school in spain

Do you know anything about those and which one is "best" ?

Ferrandi has internship and le cordon bleu don't, not sure about paco torreblanca but instead he is one of the teacher together with his son when won best pastry chef awards etc.

or if you have any other school in Europe or cheaper one outside Europe
 
656
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Joined Sep 26, 2017
Are you fluent in French or Spanish?

Those are all good places, but you would get the most out of the school in the country that you can fully understand the language.

True, they may offer courses in English, but you would still learn better if you know the native language.
 
22
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Joined Dec 5, 2015
Are you fluent in French or Spanish?

Those are all good places, but you would get the most out of the school in the country that you can fully understand the language.

True, they may offer courses in English, but you would still learn better if you know the native language.

I only speak Swedish and English.

The le cordon bleu in London will be in English and Ferrandi in Paris is also in English, Torreblanca in Spain is in Spanish but will have a translator for the international students (according to them many of the students are internationals)

Can you say something about the schools?
The "best" thing about torreblanca is its the cheapest one, only 15 000€ for 6 month and they will help me find a contact so I can find a flat.
 
656
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Joined Sep 26, 2017
I can't say first hand of the studying conditions, but I've worked with students from both Le Cordon Bleu and Ferrandi and I'd say they are equally capable. I have textbooks from both schools and I can't tell the difference without seeing the cover. I think both of these schools will serve your purpose well.

One important note is that Le Cordon Bleu London is world-famous. So when you say you graduated from Le Cordon Bleu, you won't need to explain anything further. Ferrandi is lesser known outside the professional circle.

As for Torreblanca, I think you will miss a lot of the essences through the translator. I have his books and even the translation in those are kinda shoddy. His desserts seem to be on par with the likes of Pierre Hermé, though, which are a bit fancier than those you would find at Le Cordon Bleu or Ferrandi.
 
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Joined Dec 28, 2017
I highly recommend ferrandi if you are willing to learn some basic french. Herve This is there and he is the creator of note a note cuisine, for pastry chefs it is something you absolutely must learn. I tasted a fat/sugar free note a note dessert that tasted divine, I think that is something you have to learn.
 

nicko

Founder of Cheftalk.com
Staff member
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Joined Oct 5, 2001
I don't believe language will be any issue. When I was at Cordon Bleu all classes are giving in French with an English translator. I would imagine it is the same in other schools but you should check. Instead of school have you considered simply applying for an apprenticeship at a top pastry shop? The thing about learning in school everything is perfect. When you are in a real shop you get to see how they actually make their money. No theory the real thing and it doesn't cost you anything. If you are diligent in selecting the right shop you can get more knowledge and experience than going to school. Most of the basics you can read up on your own anyway.
 
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Joined Aug 24, 2018
Hi all, has anyone heard of Ashburton Chef's Academy or attended the pastry programme there? What is it like? Similar to LCB or Ferrandi? Or has anyone taken the Pastry classes at Westminster Kingsway College and give some feedback? I am currently researching pastey schools. Thanks for the help, everybody!
 
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Joined Oct 22, 2018
Hi! My question would be, if I am a foreigner, from Asian country, and I would like to work in France let's say,especially Paris. In Pastry kitchen, whereas I have had expirience working in pastry shops in Asia before. What would you recommend?
Because, a friend told me that it's necessary to get a French certificate if I want to apply for a job in France. And even if I have a diploma in Pastry arts or hotel management in Asia, it is considered not valid to apply for a job in France or European country.
And if I am to study Pastry, which school would you recommend other than Ferrandi or Le cordon Bleu? Maybe out of Paris as well? Thank you!
 
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