Pastry Chef Salary

Discussion in 'Professional Pastry Chefs' started by chefadam, Jan 27, 2011.

  1. chefadam

    chefadam

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    Dear Chefs,

    I would like to share my concern why would many employer first questions ask about the salary expatiation. If they have a budget for a pastry chef. Can they simple say this what they want offer

    Would like to hear your thought.

    Thanks,
    ADAM
     
  2. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    Well, they certainly could, but it is similar to "playing poker", neither want to be the first to reveal their hand!

    What do you want for pay/salary? Most of us have three numbers in mind:
    • the absolute lowest you will accept,
    • what you will probably settle for, and
    • what you'd like to have (to pay for those neat ???? you want) /img/vbsmilies/smilies/talker.gif
    Conversely, what do they want to pay:
    • the absolute maximum they can afford
    • what they hope to hire you for so they can give you a raise or bonus, and
    • the least they think they can get away with.
    Remember, they do not know what you will settle for and they do not want to offer too much for an unknown.

    You do not know what they will be willing to pay and do not want to offer too low.

    For me, when the question is: "What salary/pay are you looking for?", the answer is something along the lines of: "What do you think an experienced chef/cook/??? is worth to your business/organization/restaurant?"
     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2011
  3. shavy

    shavy

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    Ooooh, very nice.  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/thumb.gif
     
  4. trooper

    trooper

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    It's the same game no matter what you do for a living.

    You have to be matter-of-fact about what you expect:

    Compensation:

    97-103K range, plus 20% overhead reduction savings, Full Benefits and a bonus calculated on 5% of annual sales in your (pastry) area.

    Conditions:

    Six-Day schedule ONLY. No on-site catering. If Total Taxed Comp is above 140K, expect a 20K Bonus for assist.

    The trick to negotiation is understanding the organization you're dealing with, where they are weak in your span of control and determining how you can add value.

    If they don't accept, then walk.  
     
  5. panini

    panini

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    Better get a pair of sneakers ;-D
     
  6. chefedb

    chefedb

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    Compensation:

    97-103K range, plus 20% overhead reduction savings, Full Benefits and a bonus calculated on 5% of annual sales in your (pastry) area.

    Pastry Chefs Salary??? 

    Don't know how you came up with these figures, unless you are trying to hire Jaques Torres. In this economy owner would laugh at you.
     
  7. trooper

    trooper

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    Quote:
    What is market average? 80k? I guess it depends on how big the place is.
     
  8. petemccracken

    petemccracken

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    trooper likes this.
  9. jessiquina

    jessiquina

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    hahaha, i dont even make close to half of 80k!!! ...but im just the pastry chef at a golf course...
     
  10. jcakes

    jcakes

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    Based on your experience and what you bring to the job, the value you think you bring could be different from what the organization needs.

    I have someone who is 8 months out of school and while she does really well at a few different things, she's not as well rounded as I need.  She hasn't gained the speed I was hoping for and still needs to be closely supervised.  She thinks she's worth more per hour than I do; at the rate she wants, I'd be letting her go because she's not worth that salary at this point. So be honest about your skills and experience and see that it is a good fit for that particular job. 

    If you are looking for more than they can afford to pay you, they won't waste your time interviewing you and getting your - and their - hopes up for a good fit.
     
  11. blwilson2039

    blwilson2039

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    I'm going to have to agree with chefedb. I live in the Phoenix area, and the average for a pastry chef with years of experience is around $40K. Most restaurants got rid of pastry chef positions when the economy tanked (including mine), and the workload was just absorbed into the pantry position. The resorts are a different matter, but they did cut back on many of the hourly positions.

    Most of it depends on your experience and what they're looking for, but don't be afraid to aim high and be willing to negotiate.