Pasteurized Eggs

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by momoreg, Apr 10, 2001.

  1. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Pasteurized egg products out of the shell have been available for years. They are sold frozen in milk container type packages. Davidson's produces pasteurized eggs still in the shell.
     
  2. thebighat

    thebighat

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    You can buy pasteurized yolks from Hallsmith Sysco in the Boston area. They come in cases of 12,I think, in one lb containers. Papetti makes them. Shaw's and Bread and Circle sell pasteurized egg products now also.
     
  3. pooh

    pooh

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    Anybody tried whipping packaged egg-whites, the ones that come in milk-type containes, but fresh, not frozen?

    In Quebec, we have that under "NaturEgg" Brand.
     
  4. thebighat

    thebighat

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    Look at the label, if it says anything along the lines of gum arabic, or carraganeen or stabilizers or citric acid, then they ought to whip up very well.
     
  5. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Pappetti's contains guar gum, I believe.
     
  6. moxiefan

    moxiefan

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    I know that commercial mayonaise, like one finds in the jar, is made with pasteurized eggs, but I also know that it bears little resembalence to what happens if one makes one's own mayonaise. It's the difference between a tasty sauce and a sandwitch condiment.

    However, and herein lies the question... if one makes one's own mayonaise with pasteurized eggs that are now readily available in milk-like cartons, which is the result closest to? It seems to me that homemade mayonaise's tastiness extends largely from the kind of oil used, and pasteurized eggs might not adversely affect it. Has anyone tried this? Furthermore, if one does use pasteurized eggs, does this extend the shelf life of mayonaise significantly? Using raw eggs is not only worrisome on its own, but one can only keep the stuff around for a day or two. How great would it be to have a safe, consistant supply of aiuile on hand, eh?

    Regards,
    P