Pasta dough ?

66
14
Joined Aug 10, 2013
I will be making pasta tomorrow, I am a beginner ? Once your ingredients are incorporated, how long do you need your dough ?
Some say 3 minutes some say 8 and some say 10 no straight answers.
What ratio of flour to eggs, do you like to use ? Some say 1 cup of flour, per 1 large egg . Some say one yolk + 3 whole eggs /two cups of flour.

Once have my pasta cut into Fettuccine noodles , how can I go about saving them? If I don't boil them right away, flour well and into the fridge.
Or must they be frozen ?
 
5,505
431
Joined Sep 5, 2008
IMO, The right questions shouldn't be how long you knead or how many yolks you're using, but why are you kneading, what goal does it accomplish, and how can you tell wether the goal is reached? Why are you adding yolks, what do they bring to the plate, what happens if you don't use any or if you use a little or a lot?

Quick answers are, you knead to develop gluten strands and make your dough elastic. You can tell you've reached that goal when the dough becomes smooth and ... well elastic. It typically takes about 10mn.

The ratio of flour to egg depends on the result you want. Yolks are made of fat and protein, so more yolks make a richer pasta. On the other hand the more fat in your pasta dough, the harder it is to develop the glutens properly, so your pasta will be less elastic, more noodle like.

Ultimately nothing beats experimenting for yourself. But to get you started, the great thing with internet is that for many of those questions some people have had the same questions before and have been though the trouble of experimenting and documenting their experiments: https://www.seriouseats.com/2015/01/best-easy-all-purpose-fresh-pasta-dough-recipe-instructions.html
 
820
495
Joined May 28, 2015
I will be making pasta tomorrow, I am a beginner ? Once your ingredients are incorporated, how long do you need your dough ?
I agree with french fries french fries comments above. One thing I've done in the past is to knead manually only briefy if I'm using a pasta machine. The action of repeatedly passing the through the rollers 'in effect' kneads the dough.
 
66
14
Joined Aug 10, 2013
I agree with french fries french fries comments above. One thing I've done in the past is to knead manually only briefy if I'm using a pasta machine. The action of repeatedly passing the through the rollers 'in effect' kneads the dough.
So your saying if using a machine,
there is no reason to need the dough ? Just bring it together to a
ball let it stand an hour and go from there?
 
820
495
Joined May 28, 2015
So your saying if using a machine,
there is no reason to need the dough ? Just bring it together to a
ball let it stand an hour and go from there?
What I do is knead it very lightly for a minute or so and form it into a ball. Stand it if you want - although I don't always do that. Then lots of passing on different decreasing settings through the pasta machine. It seems to work. I use 00 pasta flour.
 
66
14
Joined Aug 10, 2013
What I do is knead it very lightly for a minute or so and form it into a ball. Stand it if you want - although I don't always do that. Then lots of passing on different decreasing settings through the pasta machine. It seems to work. I use 00 pasta flour.
There is so many conflicting views
on this its scary ! Thanks for trying to help me out !
 
29
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Joined Feb 26, 2017
People kneed pasta dough by hand:) ok I used to make my grandmother’s recipe for chicken noodle soup thick heavy lumpy glutenous maximous noodles they were to die for.
then we bought the pasta attachments for kitchen aide mixers. Seemed to never look back.
primarily we use a semolina and just about any other flour mix. Its about the same by hand or with the mixture kneed the dough until its supple and forgiving and smooth. Really just as soon as it’s smooth you can quit If you overwork it it will firm up and loose its stretch wrap it in plastic or an air tight covered bowl let it sit ten to twenty minutes and it should come back to life. I’ve never ruined one, then let the dough rest at least 45 minutes kneed it until it’s stretch is good and it’s really pliable and roll it out the the thickness you want.

while I like egg noodles i think a really basic semolina and flour noodle is better and there less of a mess and can be stored uncooked longer at least logic tells me that. We have left them on the racks until there dried our stuffed or stuffed them in a zip lock bag and used them a week later but it’s pretty rare that there not cooked as soon as there cut out.

I can’t find a picture but a machined a set custom noodle racks that allow us to make even longer ones than pictured.
 

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66
14
Joined Aug 10, 2013
People kneed pasta dough by hand:) ok I used to make my grandmother’s recipe for chicken noodle soup thick heavy lumpy glutenous maximous noodles they were to die for.
then we bought the pasta attachments for kitchen aide mixers. Seemed to never look back.
primarily we use a semolina and just about any other flour mix. Its about the same by hand or with the mixture kneed the dough until its supple and forgiving and smooth. Really just as soon as it’s smooth you can quit If you overwork it it will firm up and loose its stretch wrap it in plastic or an air tight covered bowl let it sit ten to twenty minutes and it should come back to life. I’ve never ruined one, then let the dough rest at least 45 minutes kneed it until it’s stretch is good and it’s really pliable and roll it out the the thickness you want.

while I like egg noodles i think a really basic semolina and flour noodle is better and there less of a mess and can be stored uncooked longer at least logic tells me that. We have left them on the racks until there dried our stuffed or stuffed them in a zip lock bag and used them a week later but it’s pretty rare that there not cooked as soon as there cut out.

I can’t find a picture but a machined a set custom noodle racks that allow us to make even longer ones than pictured.
 
66
14
Joined Aug 10, 2013
You mention semolina flour do you only put semolina or do you ad AP
flour say half and half ?
I have SF on hand but have not tried it yet .
 
3,045
553
Joined May 5, 2010
Semolina and Durham flour have always worked great for me,
I ran a pasta station for Sunday Brunch and made different pastas served with different sauces.

As to the kneading question, I agree that the first setting on the rollers will indeed knead the dough, however; I also give the dough a few kneads on the counter after all the flour is hydrated, and I allow the dough to sit with a towel over it for 15 minutes before I put it through the rollers.

I make a lot of pasta at home with an authentic Italian pasta machine I bought for $5.00 at a garage sale years ago. The lady I bought it from recalls watching her mother make pasta with the machine I bought from her.
Resting the dough is a very important step that many people forget.
 

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