parsnips

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by jimmythewino, Jan 26, 2014.

  1. jimmythewino

    jimmythewino

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    any cool tasty ideas?
     
  2. french fries

    french fries

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    Sauteed, roasted, pureed.... 
     
  3. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    A member of the carrot family, one or two parsnips added to a beef stew for a touch of sweetness would be nice as they're sweeter than carrots.
     
    Last edited: Jan 26, 2014
  4. cerise

    cerise Banned

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    Parsnip/potato/carrot/ pancakes w/ caramelized onions, horseradish sour cream. or applesauce.

    Parsnip and pear or apple soup.
     
  5. eastshores

    eastshores

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    Parsnip to me is a cross between perhaps a carrot and celery. As such it lends itself especially well to cream (as in the puree) .. it has enough flavor to carry through the cream but it is not so harsh as a standard orange carrot. I'd like to try roasting them before making a puree sometime.
     
  6. mike9

    mike9

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    If you caramelize carrots and parsnips for a dish start you carrots first.  They take longer to cook and watch the parsnips they can burn quickly.
     
  7. mikelm

    mikelm

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    Only was I like parsnips is to slice lengthwise in 1/8" planks (I use a  mandolin) and sautee them in olive oil until they show some nice brown, but still have crunch. A little garlic in the oil doesn't hurt.

    Mike
     
  8. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Parsnips go so well with game. Here's a simple venison stew made with seared chunks of venison meat, then added red wine, onion, garlic and just a little dark chocolate added.

    The purée is 100% parsnip; peel, cut in chunks, boil, drain, add s&p and a good bit of cream. I use a handmixer to make the purée.

    In the beginning of the season, parsnips can taste very strong but you can always do 50/50 or whatever ratio potato/parsnip.

    Like MikeLM, I also love to thinly slice parsnips on a mandolin from head to toe and deep-fry the slices at not too high temperature (165°C). Adds a nice crunch to any dish.

     
    Last edited: Jan 27, 2014
  9. maryb

    maryb

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    Parsnips to me have always been to bitter, don't know if it is the way they were cooked or if they had been in storage a long time? I have never made them for myself because of that.
     
  10. french fries

    french fries

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    Not sure what the issue could be MaryB. FWIW I have never noticed any bitterness in the parsnips I've cooked. I'd say give them another try, they're delicious. 
     
  11. goldilocks

    goldilocks

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    Chris, that looks divine.

    I like them with a roast dinner. I parboil them for 10 mins (cut in half lengthways), dry them, then toss them in a mix of white wine vinegar, olive oil, salt, pepper, sage. Then roast them in the oven for 50 mins @ 190 degrees (170 for fan), 5 mins before the end drizzle a little honey onto the parsnips.

    Beautiful!
     
  12. chrisbelgium

    chrisbelgium

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    Thanks for that lovely recipe Goldi, it's on my new-things-to-try-out list! I'm sure they look good too on a dish, a bit caramelized and... nicely balanced with the vinegar. Lovely!