Pan, Ch Need Help!!!

Discussion in 'Pastries & Baking' started by cakerookie, May 18, 2006.

  1. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Using silicone molds pouring isomalt into them. Getting pits on backside of piece any idea whats causing it. My guess is recrystallization. Cooking to 330F.

    Best Regards Cakerookie!!!
     
  2. chrose

    chrose

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    What do you mean pits? Little air pockets? If that's the case it may be moisture in the mold? I thought the whole idea behind Isomalt was no crystallization, therefore that shouldn't be it right? Admittedly I don't have a lot of experience with Isomalt as I never liked it, so I never used it!
     
  3. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Ch, what about greasing the inside of the mold with vegetable oil? And then after its poured lift the mold and let it drop down kind of like doing cake batter to get the air bubbles out. I am with you on Isomalt I am not crazy about the stuff either...

    Regards Cakerookie...
     
  4. aprilb

    aprilb

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    Sort of like when you make chocolate shells as well. Fill, vibrate to get rid of little bubbles.

    I haven't used Isomalt either. (guess I'm just an old stubborn fart)

    OK, after having a look. Isomalt has 'low hygroscopity <I thing that's right?> meaning it doesn't (more like refuses to) absorb water from it's surroundings very well.

    I'm guessing that any moisture that the mold has will create the little bubbles you are having a problem with because the moisture creating the bubbles won't be absorbed by the Isomalt. You'll get little microscopic steam bubbles that will swell and make the pockets.

    I also read that it can cause GI problems if consumed in quantity...;)

    How you would solve this I don't know other than to just use "real" sugar. But at least it's a start.

    Heating the molds, and then coating with pam maybe?

    April
     
  5. erik

    erik

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    CR-

    One thing I used pretty successfully when pouring sheets of isomalt was, while it was still hot but solidified, gently going over the surface with a propane (or butane) torch. It takes those little bubbles right out. You have to be careful with it because too much heat can make the problem worse, and heat too quickly will cause it to crack.

    Don't know if this will help with your project, but it is worth a shot?
     
  6. panini

    panini

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    I also find that when detailing it's best to soften some surfaces with a torch. I'm really starting to like the isomalt.
     
  7. chrose

    chrose

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    It's funny timing for you guys to post that. I was reading a new mag last night and it mentioned that Isomalt has a tendency towards air bubbles and using a torch gently over the surface was the way to go!
     
  8. momoreg

    momoreg

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    Yes, I'm working with isomalt as we speak, and it is very bubbly, but I'm making blown sugar bubbles, so it's okay.
     
  9. cakerookie

    cakerookie

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    Yeah AprilB it does have a GI tract irritation syndrome. Sort of like mannitol,sorbitol and all that other stuff thats used in laxiatives. Although isomalt is a sugar alcohol it comes from maltose which is where it gets its name. Sorry did not mean to get off on a science lesson.Thanks for the tips everyone I appreciate it greatly.Have one more favor everyone whats the best way to make letters with poured sugar?

    Best Regards Cakerookie...