Pâté & Terrine

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by isa, Dec 16, 2001.

  1. isa

    isa

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    I have vision of a pâté with pistachios and dried cranberries to be serve at Christmas dinner. The problem is I do not have much in terms of pâté recipes….


    I’m not crazy about trying out a new recipe for Christmas dinner, I’d much prefer having a recipe one of you tried first; with or without pistachios.


    Thanks!
     
  2. chrose

    chrose

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    Try this. It's a fairly standard treatment with a slight alteration.

    Pistachio and Cranberry Pate
    2 pounds boneless chicken meat
    6 oz chopped chicken livers sauteed in butter
    1 cup cranberry relish (preferably fresh made)
    2/3 cup fresh white bread crumbs
    1/2 cup whipping cream
    1 egg white
    4 scallions, finely chopped
    1 garlic clove, finely chopped
    3 ounces cooked ham, cubed
    1/2 cup shelled pistachio nuts
    3 tablespoons chopped fresh tarragon
    pinch of grated nutmeg
    3/4 teaspoon salt
    1 1/2 teaspoons pepper



    1. Clean the 2 pounds chicken meat and cut into 2-inch cubes. Put in a food processor fitted with a metal blade and pulse to
    chop the meat to a smooth purée, in two or three batches (depending on capacity).
    Remove any white stringy parts of the meat.


    2. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Add the sauteed and chopped chicken livers

    3. In a large mixing bowl, soak the bread crumbs in the cream. Add the puréed chicken, liver, egg white, scallions, garlic, ham, pistachio nuts, cranberry relish, tarragon, nutmeg and salt and pepper. Using a wooden spoon or your fingers, mix until the ingredients are very well combined.


    4. Lay out a piece of extra-widestrong foil about 18-inch long on a work surface and lightly brush oil on a 12-inch square in the center. Spoon the chicken mixture on to
    the foil to form a log shape, 12-inch long and 3/2-inch thick across the width of the foil. Bring together the long sides of the foil and fold over securely to enclose. Twist the ends of the foil and tie with string.


    5. Transfer to a baking dish and bake in the preheated oven for 1 1/2 hours. Let cool in the dish and chill until cold, preferably overnight. Serve the pâté in slices.
     
  3. athenaeus

    athenaeus

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    Chrose.

    Your recipes are so well studied especially for someome who cooks at home.
    I haven't tried the confit your proposed yet but I have used some of your tips so far.

    I want to ask you if I can prepare this Pate, let's say 10 days in advance and freeze it.
    If yes , when? before or after baking it?

    And something else. Since , unfortunately, my husband hates chicken may I use something else than chicken? Or this is out of question?
    I have used chicken several times without him noticing it , is it possible in this dish? To masquarade the chicken I mean...

    Thanks

    :)
     
  4. ruth

    ruth

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    INSTAED OF CHIX TRY TEMPHE. IT IS FERMENTED SOYBEANS. AND CAN HAVE A WONDERFUL TASTE. OR HOW ABOUT TOFU? OR SOME FLAVORED TVP? OR NUTS SEEDS BREAD FRUIT EGG WHITES HERBS?
     
  5. athenaeus

    athenaeus

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    Thank you Ruth.

    But if I use toffu I am afraid that he will divorce me :lol:

    Well ,obviously you are a vegeterian who hasn't heard of carnivorous Athenaeus...

    :)
     
  6. peachcreek

    peachcreek

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    I got a little excited. Chrose, my recipe is similar enough to yours, except I bake it by lining a small loaf pan or pate mold with bacon and then bake it in a water bath. The fat rises to the top of the pan as it cooks and seals the pate.
    P.S. Looking over your recipe, I also 1 oz brandy to the puree. But I add booze to everything...
     
  7. chrose

    chrose

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    Athenaeus, thanks for the thought. I hate to burst your vision of me. Though I cook at home now I have spent the last 15+ years as a professional chef. I have been an owner of a catering company, cooked for up to 8-10,000 people in a day in another catering company. Fine Dining Chef, have a small chocolate company (currently on hiatus) ran a finishing line in a dessert factory that would produce literally 10,000 Key Lime pies in a shift, 5-6,000 French Chocolate layer cakes etc. I retired from the kitchen partially for health reasons, and also because I got an offer I couldn't turn down. So I have some background. But thanks anyway.
    Now, freezing I suggest doing it after cooking. Wrap in saran and then foil. Thaw slowly in the refrigerator.

    Chicken is used because it has a fairly benign taste and doesn't overpower other flavors. However you can use other items if you wish. Pork (no tendons, gristle etc) can be used. Remove the livers and you can use a white flesh fish, I don't know about the cranberries in that case. Veal, if your pockets are deep. Turkey, Duck etc.:chef:
    And Peachcreek I agree that Brandy can also be used. I also enjoy adding booze to a lot of things. However I don't like to flame it off too much. I want that alcohol taste in most cases. That's an integral part of the booze I think.
     
  8. athenaeus

    athenaeus

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    Dear Chrose.

    Thank you for your response.
    Obviously,I didn't make my self clear :)

    I AM the one who cooks at home not you!
    I knew that you are a chef!! :)
    I consider a great compliment for a chef to propose recipes that can be prepared by an ordinary woman in her kitchen, as me that's why I mentioned that.

    Thanks again!
     
  9. chrose

    chrose

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    Well, as I've said so often this past year.."Whoops" :rolleyes:

    Thanks for the compliment then. Until someone asks me how to do 300 Alaskan Bouillabaisse or set up for 4,700 Carrot cakes I'll keep the quantities to "normal" usage as that's mostly what we do here:p
     
  10. isa

    isa

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    Thank you so much Chrose! Your recipe sounds so good and it's exactly what I was looking for, I can't wait to taste it. :lips:


    Could you please clarify one thing for me? I'm not sure I understand what I have to do with the aluminum foil, before baking. Can I use a bread pan or some other dish?


    Thank you so much!
     
  11. chrose

    chrose

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    Sure Isa I suppose you could. The foil is primarily to shape it. Many terrine type mousses such as this are also poached, in which case plastic wrap would be used. But a nice terrine mold could also be used. If that's the case I would butter the sides generously so that you can get the Pate out easily. Just don't forget to adjust the cooking time appropriately for the type dish you use.
     
  12. isa

    isa

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    That's what I was afraid of Chrose. I do not what to leave anything to chance, not on Christmas. So I wondered if you could please give me some giudelines like the temperature the pate should be when I'll take it out of the oven.


    Thank you Chrose!
     
  13. athenaeus

    athenaeus

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    Last evening I prepared this recipe!!

    It was great, nothing was left.

    As I was preparing it I had the idea that it would be better if I froze it BEFORE cooking it.

    Anyway i will try both and will ket you know :)

    Thank you Chrose :)
     
  14. chrose

    chrose

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    Isa I would venture to guess that 60-90 minutes should be sufficient. If you bake it in a mold as opposed to wrapping it than you should be able to shake it gently. If it wiggles too much (how's that for a technical term?!) it's not done. It should barley move. Not rock hard like a meatloaf, but on the softer side. If you prefer temps go for I'd say about 180º F. and let it rest after cooking.
    Bon apetit:lips:
     
  15. isa

    isa

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    Thank you Chrose. I'll make it this weekend and will try not to eat it all before Christmas.
     
  16. athenaeus

    athenaeus

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    I am afraid that you will Isa...

    :)
     
  17. isa

    isa

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    It must be an exceptional pate. Now I can't wait to taste it.