Overcooking veggies

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by koukouvagia, Oct 25, 2012.

  1. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Are you a veggie over cooker or undercooker?  Some elderly people I know like to really overcook their veggies while I like to eat them al dente.  Believe me I love soft mushy veggies but I undercook them to retain their nutrients.  When it comes to something like kale, string beans, or cabbage that needs a long braise to soften and be edible do you worry that you lose nutrition?  We eat a lot of boiled weeds like dandelions - I always boil them until they are wilted but still a bit stringy while other people I know boil them for close to an hour and then boil them again!  What's the point of eating a vegetable if all its nutrients have been cooked out... or have they been all cooked out?
     
  2. chefross

    chefross

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    Very timely topic. Older folks usually like their veggies cooked more, but so do lots of young people.

    I have this at work as well. Mr.Boss can eat his vegetables al dente, but not Mrs. Boss. Green beans especially. Carrots always have to be on the verge of mush. The root vegetables not withstanding most of the leaf, stemmed, and tuberous vegetables, can be under cooked just fine.
     
  3. petalsandcoco

    petalsandcoco

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    Its interesting how they differ ChefRoss, my boss used to like his green beans on the crisp side now I have to boil them to death.

    But if other guests are present, I never over cook.

    Petals.
     
  4. french fries

    french fries

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    I like my veggies thoroughly cooked. That means that if you blanch a haricot vert for 3mn and then sautee it, IMO it's still raw (and not good). But that seems to be the way they are served nowadays around here. Al dente they say. I call it raw, or not properly cooked. I guess it's all in the eye of the beholder. 

    I don't worry about the nutrition. I eat a lot of raw veggies also, in fact even haricot verts, for example in Green Papaya salad. But when I decide to cook veggies, they have to be cooked (not al dente). 

    A cabbage that's not fully cooked is not very good IMO. But raw cabbage in a salad? That's perfectly fine. 
     
  5. ordo

    ordo

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    Half of my cooking is Chinese, so I got used to veggies really crisp. Quick caramelizing outside, almost raw inside. But of course, there're dishes an dishes, cooking schools and cooking schools, tastes and tastes.

    As FF, I do not care about nutrition. If you're hungry, and joyful, and the food  taste good, that will nurture you for sure.
     
  6. genemachine

    genemachine

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    I wouldn't say that cabbage needs a long braise. I usually give it a quick blanch and then sautee it. In my opinion, long braising develops that nasty cabbage odour - probably by oxidation of the sulfur compounds present in all brassicacea. Anyway, don't always worry about nutrition - your body generally knows what it wants, as long as it isn't trained on industrial flavour enhancers. I lost roughly twenty pounds and have a better blood analysis then ever since I changed to cooking purely from scratch - and I do not give a rodent's behind when it comes to what is considered healthy or not these days - in goes the butter and lard, the next dish gets drenched in olive oil, whatever. Eat real food, enjoy and live well!
     
  7. kippers

    kippers

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    I'm a Brit so I  put the sprouts on low simmer for Xmas dinner on Dec 1st.
     
  8. isolated01

    isolated01

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    In California, veggies are cooked crisp tender. I have been converted. I guess when you have the freshest produce there is no reason to mask the natural flavor. IMHO
     
  9. ishbel

    ishbel

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    I have always preferred 'just cooked' veg to overdone.  My departed m-i-l ALWAYS cooked veg almost to mush.  I remember her asking my children if they wanted more veg....  up piped my 4 year old (at the time)...  'no thank you, Granny, we don't like pappy carrots in our house'.    Awkward pause and second servings of veg were never offered again!
     
  10. ishbel

    ishbel

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    1 December?  Ahhhh, you like them al dente, then? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
  11. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    What does pappy mean?
     
  12. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    I blanch then shock almost all my vegies, then saute in butter with salt,pepper and a pinch of sugar.
     
    Last edited: Oct 26, 2012
  13. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Not all veggies are the same, needs to be said.  Some vegetables I prefer to be cooked longer while others I enjoy raw or al dente.  I can't stand the thought of a raw mushroom.  I'm with French Fries when it comes to green beans.  I want them soft and mushy almost.  I hate that waxy crunch.  I cannot eat a raw tomato, sorry.  But then again certain veggies like tomatoes and carrots are actually more nutritious after they are cooked.  Most other veggies like broccoli and cauli or asparagus I prefer al dente.  I remember once serving a cauliflower dish for dinner by blanching it first and then roasting it.  I offered some to one of my guests and he refused... his wife blurted "he doesn't like it uncooked" haha. 

    There used to be a time when all lettuces were cooked.  In Chinese cuisine they don't eat any raw vegetables.  I suppose I eat plenty of raw veggies, but I do wonder if the cooked veggies I eat offer much in terms of nutrition.  One of my favorite veggie dishes is stewed green beans with onions, tomatoes and garlic.  It cooks for about an hour and I somehow don't think of it as a veggie dish anymore and can't imagine any more nutritious than a beef stew.
     
  14. kippers

    kippers

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    How dare you all my teeth are real......and who is al?
     
  15. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Mushy, soft, baby-food pap!
     
  16. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    My dear Mother, cooked ALL vegetables until they fell apart.

    She was raised by her grandmother and grandfather from Denmark.

    They liked their ‘boiled dinners’.  Talk about baby food!  ACK!

    My husband’s household as a kid was similar, mushy everything or raw.

    I simply steam and toss in flavorings,

    like butter (shhh please don’t tell Mister k~girl he still says he doesn’t like butter),

    EVOO, garlic, fresh herbs, etc., but rarely bacon.
     
  17. butzy

    butzy

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    But everything is better with bacon /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

    Like Ordo, I mostly eat stir fries, so mostly underdone or just cooked veges.

    Rest of the time I eat salads (lettuce, raw cucumber, raw tomato, raw onion etc)

    The only time I would cook veges for a long time is when I make soup, a stew or a sauce
     
  18. kippers

    kippers

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    Satans carrots have to be boiled for 24 hrs then mashed with a steam roller
     
  19. sparkie

    sparkie

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    Wow love this one, but it's late so I'll be brief and avoid all the fluff and reasons.

    Carrots: Raw( except for mire) I will not eat mushy!
    Asparagus: Blanched and grilled, still little crunchy.
    Dandelions: Strong red wine vinegar with piada.
    Mushrooms: Just starting to like these! They have to be fresh( canned is inedible to me) cooked and expensive.
    Broccoli: The tops hot but very crunchy.
    Celery: Sticks with ranch are a favorite snack.
    Brussel Sprouts: Blanched and sauteed with bacon. Soft, but al dente.
    Cabbage: Cole slaw, Kraut, stuffed rolls, I don't care what you do to it, I like it!

    Anything picked( except eggs, but that's not a veg)

    Mostly I like my veg undercooked or raw. I did make some cardoni the other day. First, clean and de-rib, chop, boil for 2 hours with a touch of lemon juice in the water, then sautee with garlic, and tomatoes, nearly another hour. So I guess I can eat some veggies very well cooked, but not many!
     
  20. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    As far as eating raw veggies. It depends where or from what state or location they arre grown in.

         Example Canadian carrotts(I call them horse carrotts) are only good for cooking , they will break your teeth sometime ,like chewing on wood. California carrotts on the other hand are far more tender

       .  Most time the veges obtained from California are better. Florida ,except for the oranges are in most cases terrible. The  growning season is to fast . They look wonderful but have no taste. Example strawberries  Cal. Driscol are still the best.     As is Cal. Garlic the imported garlic is terrible. Basil from Florida is passable but  I need double or sometime triple  the amount to make Pesto then from other more western  California states.

    You have two growing oppurtunities here a season in Florid because crops grow so quick but again at a big loss in flavor.