Outside Event Deep Frying -- Any Advice?

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by allanmcpherson, Apr 15, 2017.

  1. allanmcpherson

    allanmcpherson

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    I have a off site (but site accessable) event coming up.  I am considering doing something that would incorporate a fried element.  This would require me using a couple of tabletop deep fryers.  Anybody have advice/warnings for this sort of thing?  I am especially thinking about heat recovery in a Canadian May...I wouldn't even want to guess what the air temp is going to be.  Are there any sensible ways of mitigating these sorts of things?

    Thanks in advance,

    Al
     
  2. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I wouldn't think it would be an issue. I will admit though I have never done fried foods in 30-40 degree weather.

    How long an event? How much fried at a time? Time frame between boxes?

    A couple of thoughts I had
    1. build a box to enclose the fryers that would allow you to put insulation between the fryers, possibly with a lid a foot or so above the fryers, that you could drop down between batches
    2. go with turkey fryers so you have a larger volume of oil.
     
  3. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    A couple turkey fryers is the way to go.
     
  4. allanmcpherson

    allanmcpherson

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    Thanks guys...glad I asked!  Saves me power outlet and is a great excuse to get a turkey fryer!
     
  5. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    They're pretty cheap and recover quickly.  I've used them for wings at outdoor events. IIRC they're around 175,000 BTUs so no problem recovering.
     
  6. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    I have fried at 30F and I ran into this issue on a outdoor burner in the winter - freezing propane lines.

    A 20 lb tank only has so much surface area to phase change liquid to gas so there is a upper btu limit you can actually hit regardless of what your regulator claims. 175k prob never happens.

    Anyway the problem is phase change to get liquid propane to gas drops the temp and you can have freezing valves/lines. At 30F it might freeze up on you within minutes especially on a 10 or 20psi high btu regulator. The solutions are to keep extra 20 lb tanks around to swap out if it happens. Ideally you have a heated garage or something so the LP tank is starting at 60F and not 30F.

    Just be aware and make sure to check on the flame once in a while. If its dead, you might not be empty, just froze. Yes this has happened to me in the middle of frying and my oil temperature was not recovering, no fun.
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2017
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  7. phaedrus

    phaedrus

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    Canada in May?  Probably not going to be 30F but it depends on what part of Canada.  You can wrap the lines with heat tape (depends on if you have power), just wrapping the lines can help.
     
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  8. allanmcpherson

    allanmcpherson

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    Average air temps in Halifax in mid-May are between 41F and 54F, so I am not super concerned with freezing lines.  Of course you never know for sure...so thanks for the warning!