Ossobuco in pressure cooker?

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I'm thinking in a recipe of my own and I'm considering using a pressure cooker to prepare the beef shank but I don't know if it's a good idea. I'm planning to use the cooking liquid to make a sauce afterwards, so I've got two questions:

1. Would I loose flavor in the remaining cooking liquid if I decide to go with the pressure cooker?
2. How long should I cook 4 beef shanks in the pressure cooker? (Assuming this is a good choice)

Thank you all for your attentuon.
 
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I say have at it and make notes of what you are doing. I think the idea is sound and has excellent potential. Let us know how it turns out. If there are issues or the recipe fails, let know what you did and we will be happy to make any suggestions for improvement.

On the other hand, if the recipe is a success, I would like to know what you did because I never would've thought of cooking this dish in a pressure cooker. :)

Good luck! :)
 

phatch

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The difficulty with the pressure cooker method is degreasing the liquid. It tends to emulsify the fat into the liquid more than a braise.
 
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I'm thinking in a recipe of my own and I'm considering using a pressure cooker to prepare the beef shank but I don't know if it's a good idea. I'm planning to use the cooking liquid to make a sauce afterwards, so I've got two questions:

1. Would I loose flavor in the remaining cooking liquid if I decide to go with the pressure cooker?
2. How long should I cook 4 beef shanks in the pressure cooker? (Assuming this is a good choice)

Thank you all for your attentuon.

I don't think you'd lose any flavor. Pressure cookers are pretty great and retaining flavor in liquids.

I have no idea how long it would take to cook them..I suggest you start low and keep adding time if they need it. Write down what you did and the next time you will have a starting point.

The difficulty with the pressure cooker method is degreasing the liquid. It tends to emulsify the fat into the liquid more than a braise.

Is this true? I make stock in a pressure cooker all the time and it generally turns out more clear than if I do a traditional stovetop...or at least "as" clear. Usually a nice fat cap on the top to peel off the next day as well. I've done things like pork shoulder, oxtail, etc and usually the broth is nice and clear.
 
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I don't get the concept - it's called "low and slow" for a reason. You can't speed up flavor development IMO. Might as well try Caq Au Vin in a microwave.
 

pete

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I don't get the concept - it's called "low and slow" for a reason. You can't speed up flavor development IMO. Might as well try Caq Au Vin in a microwave.
Mike9, you can't compare cooking in a pressure cooker to cooking in a microwave. They are only similar in the fact that they can reduce the amount of cooking time significantly. And yes, you can develop great flavor, in a short amount of time by using a pressure cooker.
 
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It was a joke Pete, but would you make Osso Buco in a pressure cooker?
 

pete

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I don't own a pressure cooker and have no desire to get one, but I know numerous, good chefs that use them either at work, or at home, and they like using them and would definitely not use them if they felt the end product was not as good, or as flavorful as doing it the old school way.
 
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The difficulty with the pressure cooker method is degreasing the liquid. It tends to emulsify the fat into the liquid more than a braise.

Agree.
High probability of losing most of the marrow into the liquid.
Not a pretty sight I am thinking.
Anyone?

mimi
 
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Joined Sep 25, 2018
I'm thinking in a recipe of my own and I'm considering using a pressure cooker to prepare the beef shank but I don't know if it's a good idea. I'm planning to use the cooking liquid to make a sauce afterwards, so I've got two questions:

1. Would I loose flavor in the remaining cooking liquid if I decide to go with the pressure cooker?
2. How long should I cook 4 beef shanks in the pressure cooker? (Assuming this is a good choice)

Thank you all for your attentuon.
Hi everyone, it's been a long time but I was quite busy with school and I've finally got my hands on a mandoline... Utensil I very much required for my operation.

I actually did cook the beef shanks in the pressure cooker and the result was quite impressive: the broth remaining was packed with umami flavor (and well, quite a lot of fat, to be honest). This liquid could be easily turnt into a beautiful sauce but I was short on time.

This is the result, I thank you all for your patience and your previous support.
 
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Joined Jul 13, 2012
I actually did cook the beef shanks in the pressure cooker and the result was quite impressive: the broth remaining was packed with umami flavor (and well, quite a lot of fat, to be honest). This liquid could be easily turnt into a beautiful sauce but I was short on time.

Since everything tastes better the next day sounds like letting all that fat rise and solidify puts us back to square one albeit a savings of energy.
 
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Joined Sep 25, 2018
Hi everyone, it's been a long time but I was quite busy with school and I've finally got my hands on a mandoline... Utensil I very much required for my operation.

I actually did cook the beef shanks in the pressure cooker and the result was quite impressive: the broth remaining was packed with umami flavor (and well, quite a lot of fat, to be honest). This liquid could be easily turnt into a beautiful sauce but I was short on time.

This is the result, I thank you all for your patience and your previous support.
View media item 141693Here's the final result. Beef shank with carrot pureé, upside down cherry tomatoes, pistachio pesto, potato gratin.
 
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