One man pastry shop?

100
15
Joined Nov 8, 2012
Hi

I was wondering if it possible to do a one-man pastry shop and have someone to be the cashier
 
4,474
422
Joined Jun 27, 2012
Depends.

If you are so busy that you need a dedicated FOH/cashier you will most likely need help in the back as well.

Does this cashier do any washing or sweeping?

Scaling ingredients and prep?

mimi
 
5,551
991
Joined Oct 10, 2005
Any successful pastry shop or bakery will tell you that bread and butter come from wholesale accounts. The front cash register doesn't make money, or iif it does, it just barely covers costs.

So, in answer to your question, yes you can have a cashier. But who will supervise the cashier? If this person is your partner--either business or personal, or better yet, both business and personal partner, yes. It will work. If this person is someone you pay $14/hr and plead to work straight 8hr 5day weeks, no it won't work.

Hope this explains things,
 
100
15
Joined Nov 8, 2012
 
Depends.

If you are so busy that you need a dedicated FOH/cashier you will most likely need help in the back as well.

Does this cashier do any washing or sweeping?

Scaling ingredients and prep?

mimi
I can probably make the FOH/cashier to do some washing and sweeping on downtime
 
Sure, it can be done. But you won't last long. 
:(

what if it a niche type of product? a shortbread cookie business for example with different flavours
Any successful pastry shop or bakery will tell you that bread and butter come from wholesale accounts. The front cash register doesn't make money, or iif it does, it just barely covers costs.

So, in answer to your question, yes you can have a cashier. But who will supervise the cashier? If this person is your partner--either business or personal, or better yet, both business and personal partner, yes. It will work. If this person is someone you pay $14/hr and plead to work straight 8hr 5day weeks, no it won't work.

Hope this explains things,
really...

I didn't know pastry shops can make most of their money wholesale accounts. I understand bakeries because of breads and other related products.

So you think it better to do wholesale accounts entirely and instead of cashier, get someone to work in the kitchen 

it possible I could get my mom as a partner handling the management because she is a finance account manager and planning to retire next year
 
2,256
716
Joined Oct 31, 2012
While I agree with everyone else. I will add a big, fat, Don't do it. Don't even try it. You are creating unrealistic expectations for yourself and developing a perfect recipe for disaster. 

    No one does any small business by themselves. While computers can  do an amazing job of helping you keep track of expenses, receipts and the rest, they are no substitute for getting done all the jobs that need doing. 

     Sit down and think hard about what it will take to run the business you envision. Consider all the various tasks involved, including those already mentioned, bookkeeping, sweeping, cash register, making delivery, actually baking the food, accepting delivery, answering the phone. putting the delivery away, general cleaning and maintenance, customer relations and on and on.  Do you realistically see yourself doing all the baking, washing all the pots and pans, cleaning the floor, as well as everything else all by your self? 

You will also need a good accountant. I have no doubt your mom is a fine woman and good at her job. You still need a good accountant. 

     Based on what ever product or products you wish to produce, create a realistic scenario for making a successful business with no artificial limitations. Having an idea of the number of people you will need will help you plan out your labor costs realistically so you are not caught short financially when the time comes to hire them. If you start by yourself, when the time comes to seek help, you won't have the time to worry about it.  Worry about it now. 
 
4,474
422
Joined Jun 27, 2012
I have been keeping up with you (thru your posts so don't get all creeped out lol) Tosh.

You were always on this slow but determined path to independence while working for the "dessert Nazi" who wouldn't buy you any tart rings and was really restrictive with the ingredients.

Are you still there or have you moved on?

A successful business (no matter what industry) starts with a bit of deep thinking and research  (this part may change so don't feel like you are tied to your first product(s).

Look around and figure out who needs what and then figure out how to go about making it happen.

Get a spiral notebook (old school yeah...but it won't crash and burn with all of your notes flying into cyber space lol) and start writing.

Doesn't matter if you think it is silly or won't ever work in a zillion years...

Eventually things will start to fall into place.

Good luck!

mimi
 
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kuan

Moderator
Staff member
7,139
558
Joined Jun 11, 2001
Yes you can, in a small town, where rent is very low.

Electric ovens.

One triple sink.

Wake up at 2am.  Work, close at 11am.
 
535
88
Joined Oct 11, 2014
Taking into consideration what you are wanting to bake which is shortbread, I would recommend you find a local farmers market and start from there. That way you can experiment with the reception from your local customers as to whether your idea is a good one or not. This will also allow you to be a one man show and let you get a feel for what it is like trying to balance all jobs without massive overhead responsibility. Just a thought amounst many.
Listen to those above and research and write a business plan. Without one you will most definitely fail!!
 
100
15
Joined Nov 8, 2012
 
While I agree with everyone else. I will add a big, fat, Don't do it. Don't even try it. You are creating unrealistic expectations for yourself and developing a perfect recipe for disaster. 

    No one does any small business by themselves. While computers can  do an amazing job of helping you keep track of expenses, receipts and the rest, they are no substitute for getting done all the jobs that need doing. 

     Sit down and think hard about what it will take to run the business you envision. Consider all the various tasks involved, including those already mentioned, bookkeeping, sweeping, cash register, making delivery, actually baking the food, accepting delivery, answering the phone. putting the delivery away, general cleaning and maintenance, customer relations and on and on.  Do you realistically see yourself doing all the baking, washing all the pots and pans, cleaning the floor, as well as everything else all by your self? 

You will also need a good accountant. I have no doubt your mom is a fine woman and good at her job. You still need a good accountant. 

     Based on what ever product or products you wish to produce, create a realistic scenario for making a successful business with no artificial limitations. Having an idea of the number of people you will need will help you plan out your labor costs realistically so you are not caught short financially when the time comes to hire them. If you start by yourself, when the time comes to seek help, you won't have the time to worry about it.  Worry about it now. 
I agree with you on all points... I was hoping that someone would say it possible lol ... just want to confirm my doubts
 
I have been keeping up with you (thru your posts so don't get all creeped out lol) Tosh.

You were always on this slow but determined path to independence while working for the "dessert Nazi" who wouldn't buy you any tart rings and was really restrictive with the ingredients.

Are you still there or have you moved on?

A successful business (no matter what industry) starts with a bit of deep thinking and research  (this part may change so don't feel like you are tied to your first product(s).

Look around and figure out who needs what and then figure out how to go about making it happen.

Get a spiral notebook (old school yeah...but it won't crash and burn with all of your notes flying into cyber space lol) and start writing.

Doesn't matter if you think it is silly or won't ever work in a zillion years...

Eventually things will start to fall into place.

Good luck!

mimi
that so cool... I never got a stalker before lol .. no worries

Yeah unfortunately I'm still working for the dessert nazi lol... I have been trying to find another job because it tough because I'm hearing impaired and employers are ignorant

Also the reason I thought of opening a pastry shop because working for someone is not going to make enough money for me to live on my own. I currently make 16/hour which is probably around 30k for the year. So far I saved up around 100k for the business.

either I open a pastry shop (huge start up and a lot of work managing), go back to school for a new career (*crying* I don't wanna lol), find an entry job in another industry and work my way up
 
Yes you can, in a small town, where rent is very low.

Electric ovens.

One triple sink.

Wake up at 2am.  Work, close at 11am.
I live in Oakville, Ontario, Canada which is a part of the GTA and it one of the most expensive places to live in Ontario. Oakville population alone is 200k and will increase to 250k by 2031. GTA popular is 6.8 million and will increase to 8.5 million in 2031... don't think it a small town lol
Taking into consideration what you are wanting to bake which is shortbread, I would recommend you find a local farmers market and start from there. That way you can experiment with the reception from your local customers as to whether your idea is a good one or not. This will also allow you to be a one man show and let you get a feel for what it is like trying to balance all jobs without massive overhead responsibility. Just a thought amounst many.
Listen to those above and research and write a business plan. Without one you will most definitely fail!!
Shortbread cookie is just an example but I agree with what you are saying

But how can I sell them at a local farmers market? because don't I have to bake in a legal kitchen since I'm not allow to bake at home and sell them to the public
 
Doughnut shop!

I love donuts.

mimi
I really do like doughnuts lol ... oakville surprisingly doesn't have a doughnut shop.. we have two independent small mom and pop bakeries, a cupcake shop, a cookie shop, a big bakery but mass produce stuffs and bringing things in from other companies and a few grocery store bakeries,
 

kuan

Moderator
Staff member
7,139
558
Joined Jun 11, 2001
OK seriously here.  You can do production yourself but you have to be very efficient.  I worked in a pastry shop once under an extremely proficient pastry chef.  Production for about 15 hours of work per day was more or less...

50 baguettes in two batches

4 cheesecake

4 truffle mousse cakes

20 focaccia

12 servings strudel or some other pastry

20 creme brulee or chocolate mousse

If you work yourself for 5 hours you might achieve one batch baguettes plus 2-4 other items depending how good you are.  You are not going to do well doing just shortbread.  Believe me.  It's good one time and that's it.
 
535
88
Joined Oct 11, 2014
In Ontario you are allowed to bake from home doing only low-risk type foods such as bread, cookies, fruit pies, doughnuts, etc. As long as they do not have any potentially hazardous food items such as quiches, or meat pies say. Also, those items baked from home may only be sold at a farmers market......no where else. This is a good thing however, as you can experiment as to what you would like to bake and what the reception will be to that baked good in your area. It can help you with connection to your community you will be selling to as well as get your name out there for when you do open a brick and mortar place. As you go along you can expand on your baked goods menu according to the response towards those baked goods. Easy!
 
100
15
Joined Nov 8, 2012
 
OK seriously here.  You can do production yourself but you have to be very efficient.  I worked in a pastry shop once under an extremely proficient pastry chef.  Production for about 15 hours of work per day was more or less...

50 baguettes in two batches

4 cheesecake

4 truffle mousse cakes

20 focaccia

12 servings strudel or some other pastry

20 creme brulee or chocolate mousse

If you work yourself for 5 hours you might achieve one batch baguettes plus 2-4 other items depending how good you are.  You are not going to do well doing just shortbread.  Believe me.  It's good one time and that's it.
interesting
 
In Ontario you are allowed to bake from home doing only low-risk type foods such as bread, cookies, fruit pies, doughnuts, etc. As long as they do not have any potentially hazardous food items such as quiches, or meat pies say. Also, those items baked from home may only be sold at a farmers market......no where else. This is a good thing however, as you can experiment as to what you would like to bake and what the reception will be to that baked good in your area. It can help you with connection to your community you will be selling to as well as get your name out there for when you do open a brick and mortar place. As you go along you can expand on your baked goods menu according to the response towards those baked goods. Easy!
Shut up! I can?! the whole time I thought I can't do it because I need a separate kitchen
 
535
88
Joined Oct 11, 2014
I know riiiiight!! Look into it more and ask your local farmers markets what is needed. It's a way you can also work on your labelling, branding and marketing to get it right. 

http://farmfreshmarkets.ca/oakville-farmers-market/

http://www.halton.ca/cms/One.aspx?pageId=19091

http://www.oakvillecivitan.ca/market.html

http://www.farmersmarketsontario.com/Markets.cfm?uSortOrder=ZoneName

Cookies are the easiest to make and transport as well as store and package so I would recommend starting with them and working in some other stuff from there. Be different and unique by offering both savoury and sweet cookies. Pay attention to your labelling, brand and social media awareness. Put a plan of action together and then get out there and DO IT!! Cheapest way to experiment with different approaches and baked goods until you know for certain what you want to offer and have a sort of cult following to your products. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
 
100
15
Joined Nov 8, 2012
 
I know riiiiight!! Look into it more and ask your local farmers markets what is needed. It's a way you can also work on your labelling, branding and marketing to get it right. 

http://farmfreshmarkets.ca/oakville-farmers-market/

http://www.halton.ca/cms/One.aspx?pageId=19091

http://www.oakvillecivitan.ca/market.html

http://www.farmersmarketsontario.com/Markets.cfm?uSortOrder=ZoneName

Cookies are the easiest to make and transport as well as store and package so I would recommend starting with them and working in some other stuff from there. Be different and unique by offering both savoury and sweet cookies. Pay attention to your labelling, brand and social media awareness. Put a plan of action together and then get out there and DO IT!! Cheapest way to experiment with different approaches and baked goods until you know for certain what you want to offer and have a sort of cult following to your products. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
thank you the suggestions and links

Do you know why it ok for farmers market to allow people to sell things that are made at home? they don't ask questions or something?
 
4,474
422
Joined Jun 27, 2012
The cottage law in Texas only allows you to sell from home and last I checked you can't even deliver,pick up only (which I am sure the HOA's have fits over ;-)

The farmers markets were totally verboten as well.

I love the Canuks!

mimi

edit...I still vote for the donuts.

Can drag the still asleep Grand to work and send her off to school with a big bag of good grades!

mimi

Good luck Tosh!

m.
 
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535
88
Joined Oct 11, 2014
It is only ok for LOW RISK foods. So certain baked goods are in that category. As Mimi has said above, DONUTS, cookies, muffins, cupcakes, etc are on that list however, certain additions are not on that list like when you add cheese or meat into the equation then it falls into the category of moderate risk foods and that must be made in a commercial kitchen. All is not lost however because you can rent a commercial kitchen by just asking around local restaurants that are only open in the evenings are great places to rent the kitchen from 6am-2pm. Lots of places if approached with this in mind will be happy to make a little extra money from you using their kitchen. There is always ways around anything if one thinks outside the box while staying FOOD SAFE. 

I would suggest starting with the cookies or doughnut category first and go from there. I know 4 cookie companies here in Edmonton that are rocking and rolling JUST DOING COOKIES and all of them started at the farmers markets. They are actually still at the farmers markets yet some now

own a brick and mortar shop as well. Check them out for inspiration:

http://www.confettisweets.ca

http://www.cookielove.ca

http://www.bloomcookieco.ca

http://milkandcookiesbakeshop.ca

https://sugaredandspiced.ca

http://www.moonshinedoughnuts.ca

Start small in your own kitchen and go big when you need to expand. These guys all started in their own kitchens and then expanded into a commercial kitchen. Here are some great commercial kitchens to rent for your experimental pleasure in your area:

http://alimentaryinitiatives.com/hot-kitchens-to-rent/

http://www.kijiji.ca/v-business-ind...nt/1211121762?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true

http://www.thekitchencollective.ca/index.php/about

http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/food/industry/bdb-start/firststeps.htm

Hope some of this inspires and helps you figure your own way /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif  
 
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100
15
Joined Nov 8, 2012
 
The cottage law in Texas only allows you to sell from home and last I checked you can't even deliver,pick up only (which I am sure the HOA's have fits over ;-)

The farmers markets were totally verboten as well.

I love the Canuks!

mimi

edit...I still vote for the donuts.

Can drag the still asleep Grand to work and send her off to school with a big bag of good grades!

mimi

Good luck Tosh!

m.
probably cake type donuts only work well because yeast doughnuts don't last long comparing to cake type since I can't make constantly to keep them fresh.
 
It is only ok for LOW RISK foods. So certain baked goods are in that category. As Mimi has said above, DONUTS, cookies, muffins, cupcakes, etc are on that list however, certain additions are not on that list like when you add cheese or meat into the equation then it falls into the category of moderate risk foods and that must be made in a commercial kitchen. All is not lost however because you can rent a commercial kitchen by just asking around local restaurants that are only open in the evenings are great places to rent the kitchen from 6am-2pm. Lots of places if approached with this in mind will be happy to make a little extra money from you using their kitchen. There is always ways around anything if one thinks outside the box while staying FOOD SAFE. 

I would suggest starting with the cookies or doughnut category first and go from there. I know 4 cookie companies here in Edmonton that are rocking and rolling JUST DOING COOKIES and all of them started at the farmers markets. They are actually still at the farmers markets yet some now

own a brick and mortar shop as well. Check them out for inspiration:

http://www.confettisweets.ca

http://www.cookielove.ca

http://www.bloomcookieco.ca

http://milkandcookiesbakeshop.ca

https://sugaredandspiced.ca

http://www.moonshinedoughnuts.ca

Start small in your own kitchen and go big when you need to expand. These guys all started in their own kitchens and then expanded into a commercial kitchen. Here are some great commercial kitchens to rent for your experimental pleasure in your area:

http://alimentaryinitiatives.com/hot-kitchens-to-rent/

http://www.kijiji.ca/v-business-ind...nt/1211121762?enableSearchNavigationFlag=true

http://www.thekitchencollective.ca/index.php/about

http://www.omafra.gov.on.ca/english/food/industry/bdb-start/firststeps.htm

Hope some of this inspires and helps you figure your own way /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif  
awesome links! this definitely inspired me greatly

trying to decide either do cookies, doughnuts or cupcakes based on popularity and quality control while being at the farmer markets ... Is it possible to do shortbread cookie only and have different flavours or have to be different kind of cookies like chocolate chip, shortbread, snickerdoodle etc?

I e-mail a speciality leasing person at a mall nearby for their cart, kiosk and temporary leasing opportunities to see if that another avenue to do instead of the farmer market since the mall is year round and farmer markets aren't. I just hope the rent/cost is not crazy high lol
 

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