on the shapton progresssion?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by indiglofish61, Dec 1, 2016.

  1. indiglofish61

    indiglofish61

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    I probably wouldn't buy these but I am just curious, I have a Shapton glass 8000, would it be ok to like jump to the 16,000, and skip the10,000 grit, or would it matter?
     
  2. millionsknives

    millionsknives

    Messages:
    2,473
    Likes Received:
    466
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    Are you sharpening straight razors?  I've never felt a need to use 16000 grit on kitchen knives
     
  3. mike9

    mike9

    Messages:
    2,453
    Likes Received:
    405
    Exp:
    Former Chef
    Agree an edge that keen will not hold up to regular kitchen use.  A sushi chef might take his yanagi that high, but none the ones I've talked to do.  
     
  4. indiglofish61

    indiglofish61

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Like I said I am just curious, I got as sujihiki, I was thinking of the 10,000, or would that be to high of grit for the Suihiki, so would the 8000 be to high also for like a Gyuto.
     
  5. millionsknives

    millionsknives

    Messages:
    2,473
    Likes Received:
    466
    Exp:
    Professional Caterer
    You can definitely do it but it might seem 'too slick'.   Double bevel - gyuto, suji,  i stop around 6k.   Your most important stones are 

    -1k-2k range for normal sharpening

    - 5k-6k for finishing

    -200-300 for repairs, quick bevel setting, thinning

    You should spend most of your sharpening budget on those three because they are used the most.  8k+ is polishing your edge/knife depends on how you use it.  It makes sense more on single bevels and wide bevels.
     
  6. foody518

    foody518

    Messages:
    1,061
    Likes Received:
    44
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
    Those higher and higher grits cost a fair bit more money, don't they?
     
  7. scribble

    scribble

    Messages:
    111
    Likes Received:
    11
    Exp:
    Home Cook
    I have always been curious as to how much stone progression is worthwhile vs just for show.  I have an EDGE PRO and most are there factory stones but do have a few shapton's for bridging missing grit areas.  I used to go through all my stones on each knife until I could read a book in the reflection but have since stopped due to not seeing a noticeable difference when stopping at 800-1000 vs going to 3k.  I am a home cook but take pride in having all my knives sharp especially the kitchen knifes so sharpening them once a month is almost like therapy.
     
  8. indiglofish61

    indiglofish61

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    12
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    I think I know what your talking about, I just sharpened my Gyuto, and when I got to the 6000, and then the 8000 I couldn't really tell the difference, under a bright light and a magnifier, I am thinkin I wasted my money on the 8000, probably on the 6000, also, these are those Shapton glass stones, lol, too late now to get my money back.
     
  9. scott livesey

    scott livesey

    Messages:
    360
    Likes Received:
    91
    Exp:
    At home cook
    the higher grits do cost a bit more.  it all goes back to the knife, the blade steel and how you cut.  If you slice, stopping at 400 to 600 grit will give an aggressive edge that work for most anything except very thin slices like sushi or garnishes.  going to 1200 will give an edge that excels at push cutting.
     
  10. foody518

    foody518

    Messages:
    1,061
    Likes Received:
    44
    Exp:
    I Just Like Food
  11. scott livesey

    scott livesey

    Messages:
    360
    Likes Received:
    91
    Exp:
    At home cook
    ANSI/CAMI is the scale I use.  it can get very confusing, here is a grit chart that shows what I mean http://www.imcclains.com/productinfo/documents/Grit Comparison Chart.pdf.  for my 'worker' or daily use blades, I usually finish on a fine Norton India.  that would be ANSI 320 or Fepa P400 or Shapton Glass 500.  It is geometry that cuts.  I would work to get the final bevel down to less than 10 degrees per side with a micro bevel no more than 15 degrees per side.  honing your edge to Shapton 8000 is great, but the refinement you have given the edge will be gone after the first pound of potatoes you slice for supper.  

    I know it is not scientific, but when sharpening I use the following scales.  "Easily slices newsprint" works well for high volume slicing(Norton fine India). "Push cuts newsprint" or "shaves without pulling" for very thin slices and for raw proteins(JewelStik fine diamond bench hone or Shapton glass 4000). This is for blades 1/16" (0.0625" or 1.5mm) or thinner, high hardness (Rc62-65), edge angle of 8 degrees per side.

    scott
     
    rick alan and foody518 like this.
  12. rick alan

    rick alan

    Messages:
    2,400
    Likes Received:
    151
    Exp:
    Cook At Home