Omelettes

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by candymachine7, Feb 24, 2014.

  1. candymachine7

    candymachine7

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    I've been cooking for a couple years now. I am currently a breakfast line cook that makes only omelettes. I wanted any advice from anyone in a similar situation. I make omelettes with one other cook, we each have a stove top with 4 burners each and every morning we get slammed with a ton of orders making speed an essential part of our work. Ive experimented with several methods of making omelettes but i never found something im happy with. Any cooks out there been through the same thing?
     
  2. redbeerd cantu

    redbeerd cantu

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    What kind of omelettes are you making?

    You got the half-moon omelette:


    The rolled omelette:


    Open-faced omelette:


    What aspect of the omelette or omelette-making are you unhappy with?
     
  3. chillhouse

    chillhouse

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    Is that an omelette or frattata?? I think i spelled it right..lol
     
  4. chefross

    chefross

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    If I was served an omelette like the one in the first picture, I send it back.
     
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  5. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    You will have to be a bit more specific with any problems you are having. The standard rules apply for having all your mise-en-place in place,  Orienting your tools for easy grasping, and remaining calm so you can think straight. 

    As for omelets, you must be doing pan omelets rather than on the grill so unless you want to keep seasoned pans, make sure you have at least three high quality non stick pans so you can make more than one at a time. Each pan should have its' own small stainless steel bowl for mixing the eggs unless you pool the eggs and strain them ahead of time. I don't recommend pooling. If you do pool the eggs, you should keep the container in a deep bed of ice.

    As Cantu pointed out, the first omelet is overcooked although that is the style I would be most likely to go with. 

    What else did you want to know?
     
  6. chillhouse

    chillhouse

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    I like the rolled omelette myself,, just for presentation
     
  7. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    I work them on high heat and like I am doing scrambled eggs, constantly moving. When they start to set, I put the warmed filling on top. Lid the pan and remove from the heat. Takes maybe 90 seconds up to this point. Let it sit maybe 30 seconds while I start another one, then I roll (or you can fold) onto the plate.

    At the point where I lid, some people will instead throw the pan under a salamander or into the oven to finish. I feel that this toughens and dries the omelette which is why I like to lid as it keeps heat and moisture in.
     
  8. veronporter

    veronporter

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    YouTube search "Jacques pepin omelette".

    Thank me later.
     
  9. redbeerd cantu

    redbeerd cantu

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    This was a game-changer for me. It had never occurred to me to begin agitation right before pouring the egg in.  I used to just pour and wait, hence my failed omelettes.  After I watched that vid on PBS, I was able to change my whole omelette game up.

    chefwriter: "strain" the eggs?  What do you mean?

    Thx.
     
  10. brandon odell

    brandon odell

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    He's talking about running them through a strainer to remove the shells I presume. I've never found the need because the shells sink to the bottom when you whip the eggs if you have a large batch. The agitation is the key to a fluffy omelet. I start with my fillings and butter, minus the cheese, spinach or sauces in the pan. If you are doing omelets en masse, you'll want to have your fillings cooked ahead of time.

    Butter and fillings go in first, then the eggs. They get folded to the center until they start to set. Every fold makes the omelet fluffier. When its cooked most the way through, like a pancake, I flip and top with cheese, spinach, etc. The opposite side is done within a minute. I fold onto a plate and sauce if there is one.

    Somewhere out there, a guy has a picture of me pulling of a perfect double omelet flip at a luxury car dealer I did demos at.
     
  11. michaelga

    michaelga

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    Pooling eggs ... means breaking them in batches and holding them for service.

    Pretty much 'out-lawed' in most places...

    You need to strain them because when broken with a wire-whisk stand mixer ... the shell bits can get every where.

    Talking about 3-4 flats at a time here... big mixer - going to be shell bits... must strain.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2014
  12. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    I'll jump back in. I would never mix eggs in a stand mixer with the shells. Crack them by hand into a large container, then strain to remove any small piece of shell that have fallen in. This also breaks up the egg white a bit and makes a smoother omelet mix.  Despite egg producers claims that the eggs have been cleaned, there is too much potential for contamination from the outsides of the shells to mix them all in with the eggs.  Michael is correct that this practice is not approved in most places, mostly because the eggs are often allowed to sit in a warm environment for too long. 

    Once the rest of your station is set up correctly, cracking the eggs to order should be fast enough. 
     
  13. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Well that's one way, the first side being the INside, flipping, finishing the outside then rolling/folding to plate.

    Another is to pour, cook til barely firm, flip, dump in fillings, trim, roll, plate.

    Another is to not flip at all, (pan method only) pull edges up to leak top puddle down beneath as it cooks,

    when losing glassiness fill (preheated fillings) roll to 2/3, dump to plate while finishing the roll.

    All depends on finished objective, the third method makes for a "rumpled" look to the outer surface,

    e.g., "country omelette". While second method better affords the opportunity to make a colorfful "outside"

    while still having it filled. Example, spinach and tomato cooked into the outer shell of the omelette, while still

    having your "loose" filling ingreds inside.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2014
  14. chefross

    chefross

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    Straining the eggs does more than just remove the shells.

    The albumin in the whites gets scrambled and mixed with the yolks and when poured through the Chinois gets homogenized.
     
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  15. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    Back when TGI Friday's had a solid reputation in the industry......and yes, there was a day when that was the case........we had several omelet and egg dishes on the menu. These were available for order at all times of the day and during all levels of business.  Working the saute station meant you needed to juggle 4-5 pans that contained everything from chicken parm or pasta prima vera to a crab and artichoke omelet and eggs to order. It may have been more but I believe about 35% of the menu was produced on the saute station at that time.

    The method we used there was similar to what I experienced in hotels. Eggs would be individually cracked into large storage containers using the china cap method. This helped to keep the shells and albumen out as some have already mentioned. Only one place I ever worked had someone that put the eggs into a mixer and then strained them through the china cap. I never liked that method because when you try to force all the egg out of the shells using the same method you would straining other things like stocks and sauces, you would inevitably push shell through the holes just as you would any other product. There was no way to keep the bits from entering into the mix at that point and imhpo, completely ruined the eggs.

    The eggs were mixed with one cup of water per gallon of egg using a large bulb, piano wire whisk. Salt and pepper was also added at  a rate of typically 4:1tsp, in that order. A couple places I ran, I substituted the water with heavy cream.

    All omelets were made with 8oz of omelet mix. This was ladled into a hot pan containing 1-1/2 oz of clarified butter. The egg was built in the pan in a type of layering method. This was done by lifting the cooked egg with a rubber spatula while tilting the pan to allow the raw, liquid egg to fill in under the cooked and was continued around the whole pan until there was only a scant amount of raw egg on the top. Heat was cut off and the omelet was then flipped and filled with cheeses and filling. We used a trifold/roll method for presentation. The eggs were also not browned in fact, they were served a little "loose" but with a solid, unbroken outer appearance.

    I learned this method back in the early 80's and I never varied from it. Anywhere I worked as a Chef, Kitchen Manager or cook that served omelets from the kitchen of from a station since then , we were known for them and people would visit us just for the omelet. I'm not saying it's the best way but it was the most successful for me.

    edit: I should also mention that with some recipes used, half of all ingredients that required the need to be sauteed prior to adding the eggs were removed from the pan and added as filling plus, reserving one piece of each ingredient for garnish . The other half remained in the pan to be incorporated into the eggs. There were times that a guest would request a plethora of ingredients and this would prove to be a difficultly with the omelet appearance. That being the case, you had to exercise a little judgment on how much to actually remove for filling versus what remained in the pan. Also, cheeses were never added to the omelet mix because of the browning that could occur. They were only used as filling or garnish.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2014
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  16. powerviolence

    powerviolence

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    I have been a AM line cook for almost as long as I have been a line cook. And if there is one thing I am confident, and there really is only one, its eggs. I cook perfect eggs every time, or they dont go out. My ticket times are perfect for AM, can do 80+ covers by myself using 4 pans and a flat top, 150+ covers with another cook and I still use 4 pans, that's all you need. 

    ...but it wasn't always like this... 

    I struggled with eggs at first, how can you be so fast but so delicate, how can maintain under 8 minute ticket times when you only have 4 pans and 45 eggs on order! Impossible I thought. You will start to get faster and more efficient once you refine your skills a bit, and that will come naturally just pounding eggs through breakfast service. When doing 100's of covers every morning and maintaining ticket times with a low man team the fasted omelette will always be the western style half moon ingredients and egg all in one pan, flip once slightly wet in the middle. The less brown the better, burnt eggs taste terrible. 

    Cooking eggs on high heat, well i know a lot of people do it well, but to be honest I am against it. Medium to Medium High and as you do more and more eggs you should be at about medium heat 3-4 orders in. Theres no way when you have to cook 30 eggs in one pan in a row, that having it at high heat will benefit you at all. You will drop some eggs in there and they will instantly brown. Salting your egg mix before, also against that as well, Egg and lemon juice is all I have used, no milk no salt just eggs and lemon juice, and the citric acid is just to preserve color. Season the veg in the pan egg on top medium heat you should be able to pump omelets out at bout 3-5 minutes per omelette, and that's only because the veg need to cook. If the pan is hot and ready to go you can make an 8" omelette in 2 minutes. 

    If you have a salamander use it, very nice for eggs. I don't even flip egg white omelettes anymore because since there is no binder anymore they can be very difficult. I find that instead of flipping the egg white I just cook the bottom, and finish in the salamander slide it on the plate. 

    Don't be afraid of your flat top if you have one. Sometimes when I get hit hard on the line i will cook sunny side up, over easy and even omelettes if my pans are full and will be for a while. 

    I dont even eat omelets anymore. After cooking thousands of them they just don't even seem like food anymore. 
     
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  17. chefbillyb

    chefbillyb

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    This is a two cheese, veggie,
    Spanish Chorizo Omelet.......I sautee the veggies, put in the egg,bleed the egg from top to bottom, flip and put in the cheese. I let the heat of the pan cook the bottom while the cheese melts from the top heat after folding. I want the top to look just done and fluffy..........


     
  18. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    Thought I'd post a pic of lunch. All this talk of omelet's made me want one so....

    This is a spinach, mushroom, onion, sausage and swiss omelet made with egg beaters using the build method and tri-fold/roll I explained.
     
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  19. meezenplaz

    meezenplaz

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    Nice presentation OS1982, but it only shows the outside. For all we know there could be giant red-spotted spiders in there!!/img/vbsmilies/smilies/blushing.gif

    Nah, Im only teasin' looks great. And no browning I can detect./img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  20. oldschool1982

    oldschool1982

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    Thanks. By the way..........was out of the giant red-spotted spiders since we had them yesterday for breakfast.

    Seriously though, egg beaters is not as resilliant as whole, fresh beaten eggs when you mix in ingredients. I have learned over the years to put everything in as a filling and not "some here some there" plus you get a fluffier and more complete omelet. I also was just about finished eating when it dawned on me to take a picture of the cross-section. Have to remember next time. And you are correct.....no browning! My first Chef would have killed me (have been hit by flying omelet too) if I browned the eggs and I haven't since.
     
    Last edited: Feb 26, 2014