Omelette Tips

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by mike adam, Mar 2, 2013.

  1. mike adam

    mike adam

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    What advice can anyone here give on making different kinds of omelettes and what techniques do you use to obtain perfection every time? 
     
  2. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    There is a Jacques Pepin video on Youtube with two possible methods. I used to cook the eggs with minimal stirring until a "pancake" of eggs formed on the bottom with uncooked on top, flip it and put it under a broiler/salamander to puff it up. Fill it and fold it onto the plate. Imho there should be very little browning on the eggs. They tend to get tough when browned. Practice different methods until you come up with one you like. I do not care for omelets on a grill. Lots of places do it but I think it's the lazy way out. 
     
  3. french fries

    french fries

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    Was... that... a... joke...? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/eek.gif  Or do they cook the omelette in a pan they finish it on a grill? Or did you mean a griddle?

    Remind me of that episode of whites:

    Waitress: - Chef, the customer is asking if he can have an eggless omelette?

    Chef: - Well you can't have an eggless omelette, can you?

    Waitress: - Why, do we not have any? 
     
    Last edited: Mar 3, 2013
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  4. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    Sorry for the misunderstanding. I should have said griddle. Pour the eggs on the griddle, let them set a little, fold the edges over to form a rectangle, fill, fold and plate. 
     
  5. mike adam

    mike adam

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    I have seen Jacques Pepin's omelette video on YouTube. His technique for making a classic French omelette is amazing. I always try to make something similar but my pans non stick coating has worn down. So does anyone else have any other omelette tips and methods? It seems there are many ways to make one and not one method being absolute.
     
  6. mike9

    mike9

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    Make sure you have enough fat in the pan so the eggs don't stick.

    Never try to cook eggs in a pan you just cooked protein in.

    I find it helps if your eggs are room temp.  I put mine in hot tap water for a few minutes to temper them.

    Watch that JP video again . . . and keep trying  . . . again . . . and again and eventually you'll get it what you're after.
     
    Last edited: Mar 5, 2013
  7. ordo

    ordo

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    Never understood what's the fuss about "perfect" baveuse omelet. I surely respect and admire Pepin, but this omelet thing…. who cares?
     
  8. french fries

    french fries

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    I can't tell whether you're joking or not?? Baveuse means some of the eggs at the center of the omelette (once folded) are still a bit runny, which means the omelette is delicious and moist. The opposite of baveuse would be dry. And who wants a dry, overcooked omelette?

    In my household it wouldn't even have been an option to cook an omelette any other way than "baveuse". 

    BTW baveuse literally means "full of spit". /img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
     
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  9. ordo

    ordo

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    I'm not jockiing. Why should I? And I know what baveuse means. Cause in Spanish we say baboso/a, almost the same word, from "baba" which can be translated as "slobber"; also, "babear" : "to drool". And if I'm going to eat an omelet, I want it baveuse certainly.

    What I can´t understand is why is it so important. It's not so much difficult to get a classic omelet but I've seen 3 Michelin stars chefs saying that if a cook can´t get a perfect French omelet, blah, blah. I would say, give me a perfect demi glace, do the classic mother sauces, or a clear, tasty consommé, etc. But an omelet?
     
  10. laurenlulu

    laurenlulu

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    At home I cook the eggs on med-low heat and cover the pan with a plate so that the top and bottom cook simultaneously, at work I stir in the omelet pan until the egg starts to congeal then I let sit and flip when they're cooked enough to hold together, then filling/folding.
     
  11. kimmit

    kimmit

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    After a few practices and advice from a dear friend, what works well for me is to have the butter really hot- foaming; add the eggs and "draw them in" so that the uncooked egg fills the space; (I am not explaining this very well am I) put the filling down one end fold the other end over, then tip the pan and the omelette rolls out onto the plate.  The whole thing should take about a minute. 
     
  12. junglist

    junglist

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    Asking a potential employee to cook an omelet is one of the fastest, cheapest ways to gauge the skill set of a person. You get to witness their technique, time management, cleanliness, efficiency, and attention to detail all within a minute or two. All at the cost of a couple eggs, and maybe some salt... much cheaper and faster than making sauces or other reductions.

    Back OT everything you should know has already been said. Using a properly seasoned pan also helps, and after cooking your omelets instead of washing just doing a scrub down with coarse salt and a dry towel will also increase the performance of the pan. And +1 to using room temperature eggs, just keep an eye on your omelet as it will cook slightly faster (ideal for industry kitchens).
     
  13. french fries

    french fries

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    Oh ok so I misunderstood you - sorry ordo. 

    The reason why chefs ask for an omelette and not a demi-glace is because it's quick and simple, so first of all it only takes a few minutes (who really wants to have 10 potential employees staying in the restaurant's kitchen for hours and hours as they are making demi-glace?) and as with all things "simple", they are often harder to make well than more complicated things (like demi-glace). It's an occasion for the chef to see how you handle eggs, how comfortable you are with a pan, if you know how to cook eggs without browning them, keeping them moist, controlling the curd sizes etc... and while it's not like there's ONE perfect omelette, it's an opportunity for the chef to see if you've ever thought of all those details and are in control of all of them, or if you're simply considering an omelette as something "easy" and just going through the moves without giving it much thought. 
     
  14. ed buchanan

    ed buchanan

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    My test to a potential new hire  Make  a French Omellette, and brunoise an onion.  That will tell it all.
     
  15. iceman

    iceman

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    I think this is the JP vid some have mentioned: 

    Jacques Pepin omelette omelet


    I like this vid just to see him work.  The eggs are just another egg dish.  Good ... but still ...   Mine are almost always like his "country style".   LOL.  I could never make a 4-egg jobbie come out as small as his.  I use 2 eggs and it looks much bigger.  I guess I get a lot more air involved in the game.   I think I could watch him cook and plate dirty socks and I'd be impressed.  His daughter Claudine could be the next Mrs.Iceman any time she wants. 
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
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  16. teamfat

    teamfat

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    One of my favorites bits in that show.mjb.
     
  17. french fries

    french fries

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    The pig boning joke is my favorite, but I don't think it's classy enough to be posted here. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/biggrin.gif
     
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  18. teamfat

    teamfat

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    That was indeed funny.  I may have to take a break from my current viewing of an old season of Hell's Kitchen and watch Whites again.

    mjb.
     
  19. french fries

    french fries

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    Too bad they aren't coming up with new episodes. That was a pretty good series. 
     
  20. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I also think that room temp eggs are a key factor in good omelets and scrambled eggs, making it easier to get good texture without overcooking.

    Of course when my wife scrambles her own eggs I cringe - in the pan WAY too long!

    mjb.