Omelets??

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by bigred0255, Jan 27, 2012.

  1. bigred0255

    bigred0255

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    Hi, 

    This is mostly for professionals, what is the standard for making an omelet as far as color goes? Is it appropriate and/or standard to cook an omelet until it is browned? No flipping? Just cook the one side until brown, then add whatever filling and fold over and serve?

    Weird question I know but I appreciate any answers and comments. 

    Thanks!
     
  2. romanas

    romanas

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    In my opinion, classic omelette should not become brown. 

    The trick is to cook omelette through and get nice sunny gold color of both sides... At least, that's an omelette appearance that I saw in France many times.

    Usually people fold omelette and flip it or roll it using pan's wall in order to avoid overcooking and keep color right.
     
  3. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    No brown.  Maybe a little, but that makes the egg hard.  An omelet is a scrambled egg in a shell made out of an egg.  You scramble the eggs in a bowl, then put it in the pan.  Allow the bottom to cook and then scrape it off with a spatula while tilting the pan so the rest of the egg goes underneath.   When it's done you fold it.  A classic omelet is actually a tri fold or kinda like a loose roll.  You fold a third by flipping it up the side of the pan (still same side down), then you slide it onto the plate while using the edge of the pan to fold the other third over.  Roll it over seam side down.
     
  4. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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  5. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    A "classic" French, country-style omelet usually has a fair bit of brown.  Not just my opinion, Pepin's (and a lot of other people's) as well.  FWIW, the brown comes more from the browned butter than from anything else.  Just sayin'.  Of course, however you like your eggs is however you like them and you should not only enjoy whatever you like, when you're my guest I'll do my best to make them that way. 

    I like mine browned or unbrowned; pancake, tortilla, folded or rolled; thin an fluffy; salami, lox, mushrooms, huitlacoche, cheese, cheese and whatever, spinach mushrooms and jack cheese, nopales, chilis, stuffed with whatever, or herb only; or just about any way but overcooked and dry.  But then, I'm picky.

    BDL
     
  6. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Excerpt from a New York Times article: http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/19/d...trates-cooking-techniques.html?pagewanted=all

    Mr. Pépin keeping the eggs constantly in motion. He’d shake the pan like a tambourine, then stop and very quickly scrape off the papery edges of egg that would slosh up the sides, then shake again.

    “I move this as much as I can, as fast as I can, so it’s the smallest curd possible,” he said. “I don’t let it brown on the top. Because browning will indicate that it has toughened the albumen.”
     
  7. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Thanks for the correction Chef.  It's true, I did use the term in reference to a country style omelet, while Pepin refers to (what I'd call) Parisian style as "classic French" in differentiation from "country."

    If you look at the video posted in post 7 of the previous omelet thread you can see that Pepin's country style (folded) omelet has quite a bit of brown, unlike the Parisian style omelet he's talking about in the NY Times interview and the second part of the already referenced video.  I suppose the question of whether brown is a good thing or not in French style omelets comes down to whether you choose to believe the NYT or video Pepin.  FWIW, the famous "Omelette di Mere Poulard" at St Michel -- indisputably the most "classic French" omelets of all -- show more than a little brown as well:



    You'd think that by this time, I'd have learned not to trust my lying eyes. 

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2012
  8. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Given a choice of Pepins, I would go with the non browning Pepin because " browning will indicate that it has toughened the albumen".
     
  9. kuan

    kuan Moderator Staff Member

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    Brown vs. no brown.  LOL!   Food people are nuts.
     
  10. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    As it was explained to me in orientation, it is a highly desirable trait and quickly becoming a requirement!/img/vbsmilies/smilies/lol.gif
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2012
  11. bigred0255

    bigred0255

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    Thanks everyone. Seems almost like a matter of preference. I do not like my eggs brown but the restaurant where I work wants the omelets browned. I disagree but the owner wants things her way. I can't believe people don't send them back but, hey, what do I know?!!

    That Jacques Pepin video was awesome. Thanks for sharing. 

    Thanks again. 
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  12. chefedb

    chefedb

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    I was always taught by real European Chefs  many years ago that a Classic French  Omelette had No brown edges and was slightly creamy on inside in a 3 fold. All done with the wrist. An American one was a twofold and could be brownesd a bit. It was let to set on one side then flipped. A frittatta  was opened and evenly browned all over.  Things may have changed but I haven't  (just stubborn I guess)
     
  13. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    You'll have to go to Mount Saint-Michel and tell them they've been making "American omelettes" for the last thousand years. 

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Jan 29, 2012
  14. chefla

    chefla

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    A frittata is browned and there is a variation of it in other cultures (other than Italian). The eggs are scrambled and other ingredients are incorporated and the outside of the eggs are caramelized. It's a different way of forming a package. A classic omelet is creamy and folded over (like an envelope) the filling as I understand it. I think the goal - for a classic omelet-is perfect and unblemished -No brown bits-but I don't think you'd be penalized in an informal setting. What I mean is- where is this omelet being prepared and for whom?
     
  15. romanas

    romanas

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    There were no such word as "omelette" one thousand years ago. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif

    But thank you for video and mentioning of this type of omelette. It looks to me that they are making something similar to an "herbolace". And it is very interesting.
     
  16. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Okay, 700 years. 
    If I'm not mistaken the Romans, in their Latin speaking days, called what we'd call omelettes "patinae."  Rabelais used "homelaicte d'oeufs" (okay, I admit to reading Pantagruel in translation); but  what's in a name? 

    The Mt. Saint-Michel omelettes are nothing at all like an herbolace.  An herbolace is an English sort of cheese pie with indentations in the cheese, and eggs baked into the indentations.  As far as I know (not very) it's usually made in a top and bottom crust. The Saint-Michel omelettes are just eggs beaten thick, and cooked in butter over an open fire.  Hot fire, hot pan, hot butter, brown bottom.  The eggs are not baked on cheese or on or in a crust. 

    As far as I know anyway.

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2012
  17. southpoleman69

    southpoleman69

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  18. iceman

    iceman

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    OK. I forget just how long it's been, but it's been since the first (lately, not old) omelet thread was started, that I've been trying to make them like Pepin. I can't do it. Using a good glob of butter wipes out any chance that mine won't be "browned". Still, there aint'e one bit of toughness in them, so that part I'll just contest. Having any "brown", to my palate, is no problemmo. I think that "tough albumen" part is all a French attitude difficulty thing. After that, no way in hey can I get a 3-egg omelet that small and thin to fold up like any of the vids. Mine are all big thick and fluffy (and all cooked through, just barely, but still). NO, my omelets are not just a big half-round solid scrambled egg plate. My 2-egg omelets come out very big, making a nice meal. Mine are done completely on top of the stove, 95% on one(1) side, flipped twice and then folded. They are not so hard-cooked that the folded inside part will stick together still. There is no runny part though. I've never had any sent back. Frittatas are an entirely different dish and a different story. 
     
  19. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Don't worry, just keep at it.  It took me lots of practice to be able to make a 3-fold omelet like Pepin.  I had to put my own spin on it though.  I found that a rubber spatula helped a lot.  I do not flip it.  I keep it on the lowest setting possible and put a lid on it to ensure the top steams a bit.  Just keep at it.
     
  20. romanas

    romanas

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    Not exactly. There are some receipts of herbolace-herbolat-erbolat that don't mention cheese. For example, the one from "The Forme of Cury" calls for a lot of herbs, but there is no cheese. As for me, I think that the key point of herbolace was an idea of pouring eggs mixture into an iron pan and frying it over open fire. That's exactly what we see in case of Mt. St. Michel omelette's. And I think that a dish with a new name "omelette" appeared when stoves became popular in Europe. But that's just my humble theory of course.

    BTW, I checked what Gallica Library says about Mt. Saint Michel omelette and it looks like this kind of omelette has appeared in a second half of 19th century when Mme. Poulard began cooking it for very rare (just imagine that!) visitors of monastery. :)

    ps. Please don't think that I'm arguing, or want to say you're wrong, or something like that. Actually, I'm just guessing and trying to find a little bit more information. If I'm looking not polite, that's definitely because of my far-from-good written English.
     
    Last edited: Feb 1, 2012