Old world cooking or using technology what do you prefer?

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Joined Aug 4, 2000
 
I'm glad those gadgets and gizmos are on the market because they make food prep more accessible to people who have mobility or dexterity issues or folks who otherwise can't handle a knife safely or comfortably. I might not use them, but anything that makes it easier for people who might otherwise be dependent on packaged or delivered foods to prepare fresh food at home is aces in my book.....
I agree with you 100%.  Mobility not being an issue, there is something to be learned when making pate brisee manually that just won't come across with a mixer even if it is a Hobart!  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/redface.gif  
 
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That's another great point: the knowledge. Several months ago a retired gentleman who'd never baked before bought himself a KitchenAid and wanted me to teach him how to make yeast breads. It took him a while to get on board with the idea that while he could absolutely use a stand mixer if he wants, it was important for him to successfully make each recipe by hand at least once by hand.You just experience the process more intimately and are more sensitive to the changes of a dough you make by hand. So when you switch to the stand mixer, you'll be able to touch the dough and know when, exactly, it's right.

I think knowing how bake without modern conveniences is like knowing how to drive a stick, even if you've always had automatics. You might not need it in your daily life, but it's a good skill to have.
 
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Joined Aug 21, 2004
 
Is there anyone here (excluding the professionals) who prefers to make pastries, cakes, cookies,  etc. using old fashioned tools,...
People probably asked this same question after new fangled egg beaters came out in the 1850's /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif  
 
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That's another great point: the knowledge...........So when you switch to the stand mixer, you'll be able to touch the dough and know when, exactly, it's right.

I think knowing how bake without modern conveniences is like knowing how to drive a stick, even if you've always had automatics. You might not need it in your daily life, but it's a good skill to have.
Baking Skills = Tactile sense + Observations.......................as some other member has pointed out at this forum.  8)
 
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Joined May 27, 2013
 
That's another great point: the knowledge. Several months ago a retired gentleman who'd never baked before bought himself a KitchenAid and wanted me to teach him how to make yeast breads. It took him a while to get on board with the idea that while he could absolutely use a stand mixer if he wants, it was important for him to successfully make each recipe by hand at least once by hand.You just experience the process more intimately and are more sensitive to the changes of a dough you make by hand. So when you switch to the stand mixer, you'll be able to touch the dough and know when, exactly, it's right.

I think knowing how bake without modern conveniences is like knowing how to drive a stick, even if you've always had automatics. You might not need it in your daily life, but it's a good skill to have.
Don't mean to be contrarian, but I see it the other way around.

Driving a stick is like doing everything with your knife and hands, while an automatic is the food processor and a stand mixer.

But I understand what you mean. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
 
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Joined Aug 4, 2000
 
Don't mean to be contrarian, but I see it the other way around.

Driving a stick is like doing everything with your knife and hands, while an automatic is the food processor and a stand mixer.

But I understand what you mean. /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
But can a food processor perform a julienne or scrape out the vanilla seeds!  Uhh ooh, let us not micro-manage!
 
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What does it really matter if the end product is good? There is a time and place for each. Cooking should not be a matter of technique snobbery or a test of manhood. Nor should driving a car, or choosing a camera or watch. These types of conversations go on in those forums too. If one likes doing things the old-fashioned way, great; if one likes doing things with power tools, great... As long as it achieves the goal.
 
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What does it taste like when it hits the taste buds, is all that counts.  Sometimes presentation helps.
 
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Retiring meant downsizing the house. The kitchen became less than half of its former glory. Many items previously at hand, were relegated to the garage or appliance closet. The mixer, perched in the closet precariously on a slide-in-shelf, means moving it needs to be justified against the effort of doing without. The value of a special tool became under scrutiny especially in light of the fact that storing it in the garage often meant moving one of the cars out of the way to get to it.

The downside is not lost on me. I have not made fresh pasta in 6 years and I wish I had the mixer and the pasta attachment more accessible.
 
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I very much agree with you.Granted,these new cooking devices give an edge becoming quick and convenient for volume,but i still find myself doing whipped cream,mereng,bernaise with a whisk and bowl with pleasure ,for it keeps me humble/img/vbsmilies/smilies/chef.gif
 
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Quote:

Originally Posted by Wyandotte 
 
Is there anyone here (excluding the professionals) who prefers to make pastries, cakes, cookies,  etc. using old fashioned tools,...
People probably asked this same question after new fangled egg beaters came out in the 1850's
smile.gif
 


My fave old tool is a "Mouli-Shredder". 

Made in France.  Seems to be tin.  It has 3 disks of different sizes. 

Given to me in 1988 by a woman born in 1900 and much worn (both the device and the woman).

Still functions. 

Anybody takes that from me is doomed. 

Yes, indeed, it beats putting whole nuts in a thick brown paper bag and then rolling  the bag with a rolling pin.  The little inexpensive electric grinders are ghastly for nuts. 

Technology, as you suggest, is all relative.
 
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Every year I make lots of English Style Christmas Puddings.  I always mix all my ingredients by hand.  Not just because this is how it was always done generations gone by in my family, but to also ensure every pudding get's the wish it so greatly deserves (another tradition in my family).  I also use the same bowls that were used the previous year to steam the puddings in.  There is so much emotion attached to particular products (especially the Christmas Pud) that it wouldn't feel right to do it any other way :)
 

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