Old School terms

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by cabotvt, Jul 6, 2010.

  1. cabotvt

    cabotvt

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    Hello,

    I just finished reading a thread where age, religion and old school were discussed so..

    What old school terms and there meaning can we come up with.

     Up first: The term "86" where did it come from???
     
  2. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    174
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    A story I once heard was that it originated in a speakeasy in Brooklyn during prohibition. It was located at 86 Bedford Street, the address was on the rear of the building and their was another address on front. When the place was about to be raided by cops entering thru the front the barkeep would yell out 86, therefore all the patrons would run out the rear 86 address exit. I guess meaning no more, or out of.   If true or not I don't know for a fact but any thing is possible.   How about  draw one,, burn one, stretch one, a limey  down, adam and eve with a dark raft . Pittsburg, These are some more old ones.
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2010
  3. cabotvt

    cabotvt

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    Ed I guess any story is a real as mine, here goes

    86 was the phantoms the English had to sail or row out to, to dump the trash, Any closer and it would come ashore.

    What about " You better whistle while you work"
     
  4. cabotvt

    cabotvt

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    YYou got me on the Limey one???
     
  5. leeniek

    leeniek

    Messages:
    1,642
    Likes Received:
    39
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I think and please correct me if I'm wrong but it has to do with limes being the only fruit available in England at one time?  Maybe?

    My mom used to say she was "flommoxed" when I was misbehaving as a child.. just what is "flommoxed"??
     
  6. sushiguy

    sushiguy

    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Line Cook
    ive had this conversation with many cooks, and everyone has a different story or idea as to where 86 comes from.  im sure there must be one original but there are many different ideas out there.
     
  7. rat

    rat

    Messages:
    562
    Likes Received:
    21
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Limey is from when English soldiers carried limes aboard to prevent scurvy.
     
  8. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

    Messages:
    8,551
    Likes Received:
    193
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    Lots of "86" stories, non certain.  The two most common: Article 86 of the NY State Liquor Code defined the conditions under which a bartender could refuse service.  And, a grave is dug 8 feet long by 6 feet deep.

    "Limey" is much easier.  It comes from the practice, beginning long ago, of the Royal Navy to include citrus juice with the sailors' daily grog ration in order to prevent scurvy.

    BDL
     
  9. gypsy2727

    gypsy2727

    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    "You could shoot a canon through the dining room and not hit anyone!"
     
  10. cabotvt

    cabotvt

    Messages:
    75
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Owner/Operator
    "You could shoot a canon through the dining room and not hit anyone!

    Gypsy, that would be the Royal Navy, those guys with the limes and scurvy.

    Just kidding easy no throwing the bubbles and squige (did I spell that right) those potato pancake things with leftover in them.
     
  11. gypsy2727

    gypsy2727

    Messages:
    523
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    hahahahaha!!

    well I think it was the 86th regiment that said that !

    No idea about the bubbles .....unless your thinkin of a Scottish lass..... which I am not

    I am an Irish Gypsy
     
  12. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    174
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    1 Limey=======In coffee shop or luncheonette slang  is Ordering >>A toasted english muffin  
     
    Last edited: Jul 7, 2010
  13. greyeaglem

    greyeaglem

    Messages:
    696
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I think Cabotvt means bubble and queak, potatos and cabbage cooked and mashed together. The name comes from the sound it makes when it cooks. Of the others, I only recognize Adam & Eve on a raft. I had someone request a "Pittsburg" style steak a while back. I had never heard of it. By their desciption, it was what I would call a char rare. My line cook accomplished it by pouring oil on the open broiler to make it flame instead of using a cast iron pan like I told him to. It was worth his very life that he didn't set the Ansul system off. I have told them repeatedly when I catch them leaving the equipment on when they close that if they start the place on fire, they better pray it burns down because I will kill them if they set that extinguisher off and I have to clean it up. Anyone want to explain the rest if the terms? I'm especially curious about "stretch one". I can't begin to imagine what that means.
     
  14. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    174
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    Greyeaglem!  Your line cook knows what he is doing.  Some places put a sizzler pan on top of open burner, let it get real hot and throw oiled steak on. Its raw on inside, well crusted on outside called Pittsburg because of coal mining,  as outside of steak looks like charred coal.

    Stretch==a coke(tall glass)   draw=== a coffee,  burn one ==a malted(whirled on malt machine friction-burn) There are 100s more , but I am showing my age.. Restaurants in the 50s and back had their own language why I don't know as sometime it was faster to use real meaning.
     
  15. gunnar

    gunnar

    Messages:
    1,447
    Likes Received:
    47
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    A Pittsburg sounds like a Black and Blue.  had a chef just take the Brulee torch to the steak while on the apron of the grill.
     
  16. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

    Messages:
    8,551
    Likes Received:
    193
    Exp:
    Cook At Home
    "Stretch one," is a glass of Coca-Cola.

    BDL
     
  17. greyeaglem

    greyeaglem

    Messages:
    696
    Likes Received:
    18
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    Thanks for the definitions Ed. And yes Gunnar, when I looked into the term on the 'net they referred to it as black and blue also. They also claimed the term came from Pittsburgh steel workers cooking steaks for their supper on the hot mold casings. Who knows? Here in the upper midwest, someone wanting a steak like that would call it a char rare. I like mine char med. rare and I do it using a heavy pan that I heat on med. high heat. If the smoke alarm doesn't go off when I throw the steak in, the pan wasn't hot enough. That's how I told my cook to do it. With a cast iron pan as for Cajun blackened but minus the seasoning. My problem with him squirting oil on the broiler was the resulting 4 ft. flames that I thought would for sure set the Ansul off.
     
  18. cycle1667

    cycle1667

    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    10
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    This is off topic but has anyone ever seen an ansul go off?  In my 30 years I have never witnessed this (knock on wood) but I have heard, usually through 3rd parties that it is a mess.

    _____________________

    Wildwoodovens.com
     
    Last edited: Jul 23, 2010
  19. gunnar

    gunnar

    Messages:
    1,447
    Likes Received:
    47
    Exp:
    Professional Chef
    I saw it on t.v once. I think it was that show The Restaurant,  IIRC it was that Rocc DiSpirito started a wood fire in a gas fired pizza oven . Ended up setting an interior wall on fire. The Sous Chef shut down the line, covered it all with towels and fired off the ANSUL. Which was kinda stupid in my opinion, especially since he then took a hammer to the wall the fire was in and ended up having to use a simple fire extinguisher to put it out..

    The mess was incredible.  No way service would continue for that night and at least a day of cleanup and IIRC it has to be reinspected before the restaurant can open again.
     
  20. chefedb

    chefedb

    Messages:
    5,516
    Likes Received:
    174
    Exp:
    Retired Chef
    I did a Kosher party in the old Hotel Pierre in NY back in 70s.. The Rabbi came in to kasha the kitchen, some how he set off the ansul. What a fiasco. 2 guys from the hotel came in after everything was coated with white powder and foam and asked me if thats how you make place kosher. I laughed to myself and told them yes. The caterer was screaming at the rabbi but some how that night party went off.ok.guest did not know. Off premise catering never ceases to amaze me.