Old Blodgett 1/2 conv oven door problem

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by metrakay, Apr 28, 2006.

  1. metrakay

    metrakay

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    Hi, folks.

    I have a very old Blodgett half-size electric convection oven. During the first hour or so of use each day, the door frequently slips off the beebe-thingy on the frame and the fan goes off. Push on the door, and everything is good, momentarially. There's a striker plate (wrong term?) on the top of the door that slides under the beebe and acts as a latch, could it be worn out? Is that likely? If so, how to fix it? If not, any ideas what could be causing these symptoms?

    I hope someone knows how to fix this -- I bought the oven off ebay, so was filthy and needed a new element, but hey, the labor to clean it was was free (mine), and the oven was cheap. Had to use an engine wheel puller to remove the fan to clean it. Had to chizel off some of the bolt heads where grime had soldered them on in order to put on the new element. Once it was cleaned up and reassembled, it worked great. It has been working great for over a year, but the door problem has been getting worse and worse over the past few weeks.

    Thanks,

    Metra
     
  2. crazytatt

    crazytatt

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    what do you meen by "beebe", do you mean a trigger or latch? If it is responsible for keeping the fan running, I'ld take it apart and close the circuit. Better on then off I imagine,
     
  3. panini

    panini

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    Metra,
    The bee-bee thing wares. One of the sides has to be increases. If I can remember correctly, take of the female part of the bee-bee thingy. Place a washer under the part and reinstall. This should give it enough elevation to keep it from dislodging. If it's not high enough then add another washer. These parts also become worn smooth. Take a green pad and scuff the two sides a little. I hope this makes sence. If it doesn't or is not a correct fit, take a picture and email it to me and I'll show it to my equipment guy asap.
    Panini
    after crazys post it got me thinking. I'm assuming that your fan switch is in the door like a car. If not there may be another fix. Either way, don't worry, we'll get it fixed. It may also be that one of the doors may have dropped a little.
     
  4. metrakay

    metrakay

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    Panini, Thanks!

    The latch plate (female part) has a groove worn from sliding under the beebe, and the edge of the "socket" the beebe fits into is worn away. The beebe rolls but doesn't move much at all -- shouldn't it move up and down a little bit?

    This oven has only a single door. The fan has a switch like the light in a refrigerator -- a little button gets pushed when the door closes. I had originally thought maybe it got stuck. The button is stiff, but does move once it has been pushed a time or two. The door is close to the oven at the bottom and further away at the top, like it might be warped.

    Here's a picture of the plate:
    [​IMG]

    Thanks again,

    Metra
     
  5. panini

    panini

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    It should. Can you get that part in the picture off? That is the one I called the female. If so place two small washers under it. Won't lifting that piece make a secure fit?
    If you still have the plate on it with the ser.# and model# these strikers are usually available in replacement.
    WE must save all these dinosaurs from extinction.
     
  6. even stephen

    even stephen

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    I had the same oven in half and whole model. Basic models with timer
    and no computor panels. great oven. In the long run its easier to order
    the whole ball and plate and reinstall it. You can log onto blodgett web
    site and find your model and order the piece. If not any restaurant supply
    can get it for you. Sometimes the bottem of the oven door will become
    dented or bent as well. Boy, I love those ovens. I would keep mine on
    the highest temp setting all night. They don't make em like they used to.

    FWIW
     
  7. metrakay

    metrakay

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    Thanks for all your help. I really appreciate it.

    It might help (lifting it) -- I have one small washer and should be able to find another at the hardware store, or two that match.

    I'm concerned tho' because of the wear on the door itself -- doesn't that indicate the door is too high? Or maybe tilted? Of course, it could be very old wear too.

    The little monster is a Blodgett CTB-1, sn 0281L9264101, I think it was built prior to '83 (the fan's rocker switch is light blue). Based on my downloaded parts list, I think the part is #8583 Door Catch Striker Plate, which goes along with #8584 Door Catch Ball Plunger with Nut. Perhaps I should replace them both since the ball doesn't "plunge" it just rolls.

    The door's fan switch is pretty stiff, and I was wondering if that may be causing too much wear on the strike plate and plunger.
     
  8. metrakay

    metrakay

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    Panini -- I tried to remove the strike plate and broke the screwdriver. IOW it is on there really tight. I'll hit it with some engine cleaner & see if that loosens it up.

    Even Stephen -- That's exactly the model. One switch for fan, one for autocool, dial for temp and dial for time. It is a great oven. Makes the best biscuits & scones... There are only two things that haven't ultimately been successful in it -- creme brule and box cake mix. Cheesecake works great, but not the creme brule. Oh, well. Maybe I'll get a non-convection oven someday and can do it then. In the meanwhile, I have a great excuse not to do box cake mix. (I have relatives that only like box cakes)

    I sure appreciate everybody's help. When I bought the place, it supposedly had working equipment and was licensed and licensable -- HA! So, I've had to redo the whole kitchen on a very long, thing, shoestring, and the exhaust system had to be completely custom due to the roof. It took me a year, but I now have it up to code and licensed.
     
  9. even stephen

    even stephen

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    m,
    know how you feel. In the place I bought in the 90's I felt like
    I was replacing the floor tiles one at a time. Walkin, hood system,
    etc. I found an old fuse box that had a stack of pennies in it and
    was hot to the touch. The building I bought was a 1904 drugstore
    with all original fixtures, I covered the bar in copper put in a twin
    torino chrome espresso machine and finished the place in crafts.
    Hated to leave it, but, its a lonely existence owning your own place.
    Kind of like owning a liquor store, its better to close it when you go
    out of town or on vacation. Good luck.
     
  10. panini

    panini

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    Metra,
    The great thing about that is you get to know your equipment. And that equipment gets a little more respect and maintanance if you have done some outpatient surgery. You can always throw a level on that door. I think Even
    Steven is probably right in getting a replacement. I had no idea it was such a young pup. I've got a double double stacked blodget that I picked up in Chicage and hauled it to TX. The kids were selling off the grandfathers bakery. It's my pet. 1" plates, no safety items to get in the way. No thermocoupler, nada, not even dials, just handles that do 180 deg. for temp. I also just acquired an original Standard gas candy stove, the kind you see them make fudge with. I don't think it has ever been used.
    BTW I looked through my dozen milk crates to see if I had a plate but couldn't find one.
    Use the brand peretrate on the plate and be careful using anything around heat, even if it is electric.
    Jeff
    oh BTW I outbid the other person on my oven from chicago, They quoted them 550. to remove it, they paid me 400. That covered the truck and most all expenses involved except for the beer and pizza in C
     
  11. metrakay

    metrakay

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    Even Stephen, Floor tiles? I wish -- I was told sheet vinyl or wood only.

    Even Stephen, Panini,

    This place is so rural that until right about the time I came, the health inspector came in from Tulsa and did three counties' restaurants in one day. They finally hired someone to do them full time, and I was his first new license. His supervisor came down from OKC to train him on procedures using my place as the class room. They went over everything. I had to get rid of my le Cruset -- the supervisor thought it might chip. I had quite a collection... it made the best stews and chilis.

    Mind you, the b&b had a restaurant license when I bought it and had, for at least 10 years.

    There was no ventilation system, no triple sink, no handwashing sink, but it did have residential stove, frig, and dishwasher. Residential stove had builtin micro that didn't work, had oven didn't work, burners weren't level and didn't heat evenly...I junked it as soon as I could and replaced it with the Blodgett & a 6-burner gas Wolf cooktop (also from ebay and also filthy). I had to have a custom hood built due to the roofline, can't use the dishwasher 'cause it's a residential... all this for scrambled eggs, biscuits & sausage gravy.

    So, I told the equipment it will have to pay for its own way and started doing out-of-house catering when ever I can and in-house teas and desserts likewise. Had my first tea this week -- I've only been telling people about them for 2 1/2 years...they loved it, I'm glad to say.

    Sounds like a great oven. This one is. Great biscuits, great anything but creme brule and box cake mix... gives me an excuse not to cook box cakes... but I have relatives around here that only like cakes from a box -- they'll just have to have their mother bake for them.

    Does the stove have an eye for those big copper bowls?
     
  12. panini

    panini

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    oh yea, it's way cool, with a movable insert to adjust the flame pattern and removable rings to accept different size bowls or can go complete flattop.
    OK THAT'S IT. My 15yr old is supposed to be some kind of computer wiz. He builds them for others @60 per hr. has AP courses and A+ whatever that is. I am going to get him right and teach me how to post a pic. There will be a picture of the candy stove posted as soon as he can break away from working for others to help me.
    BRB
     
  13. metrakay

    metrakay

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    Sounds like. Be great for rendering lard to make crackling bread. WHen I was little, we had a neighbor who had a HUGE cast iron kettle, big enough to bathe in, that she used over wood. Took like four men to lift it into place. Mind you, her only cookstove was wood, too, until after I left there in the mid '70s.

    Re: Pics -- isn't that why you have a 15yr old in the first place?
     
  14. panini

    panini

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    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG]
    That copper pot is 43 pounds
     
  15. metrakay

    metrakay

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    Wow! That's beautiful. It's a piece of artwork by its own self, even if you never do use it.
     
  16. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Pan, I'm turning green, very green with envy.............
     
  17. panini

    panini

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    I was thinking of getting an model T, convert the stove to propane and take it on the road to fairs and stuff and sell candied nuts. My wife saw right through that one, it's was the model T I was after:lol: I've been told every week I have too many old cars. only 3:crazy:
     
  18. metrakay

    metrakay

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    Car Life stages

    Depreciates: New
    Depreciated: Old
    Appreciates: Vintage
    Priceless: Antique


    If you wait until your ARE retired, you could hang a sign on the car "Sweet nuts from an antique, prepared by a sweet antique nut". (or "fresh" if you'd rather, instead of "sweet". Or maybe "crusty"?
     
  19. panini

    panini

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    :lol:
    My cars appreciate more then my investments. My spouse just won't believe it. And when I say that, she responds,"well, sell one and let's see":talk:
    '66 Mercury Comet Cyclone (pace car) 96% done, '74 Jensen Healey NMT My 15 yr old starter, and a '63 split window maybe 65% done I like rare:D
     
  20. katbalou

    katbalou

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    dear panini,
    i want one of those!!! :bounce: have you tested it out yet? (the candy stove - not the cars)
    kat