Ok so i have been recently learning at the Church Green from the youngest ever michelin star winner

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by simonlfcgreen, Sep 7, 2010.

  1. simonlfcgreen

    simonlfcgreen

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    The guy is an absoloute genius. And hes got me thinking of allsorts of stuff.

    I  came up with a dish just wondering if it would work i relly think it would.

    Salmon, Vodka and Beetroot Jelly, Parmazan Tuille and Butter bean Frichasse

    Basicly im thinking of doing the Salmon in a liquor and Cork bullion poached. His brother suggested id grill it to stop the scum that appears on the salmon. I really think when grilling salmon though its too fishy but he knows best so ill do what he says.

    Now the vodka Jelly i was going to burn the alcohol out. But i think the sharpness of it would complement and balence everything out now again he sugested i add beetroot to it but i can help thinking a split would look and taste better.

    Now the Tuille i thought of doing the old egg whites method. And just break in to little pieces i know Parmazan is a very distinct and strong flavour the reason im doing egg whites is to hide that sickly smell.

    Now the Butter bean and thyme Fricasse i was thinking of white wine reduced with bayleafs, peppercorns and cream reduced till thick sauce then adding the butter beans with thyme leaves. I cant help thinking the simple method may taste better may just butter bean and thyme purree

    Opinions please?  
     
  2. boar_d_laze

    boar_d_laze

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    Hi Simon,
    Presumably Cork bullion means court buillon.  If you want your salmon poached, poach it.  You can wipe the scum off with a paper towel, then glaze it with butter or oil to put some shine on the surface. If you wanted a little color, you could hit the top with a torch before oiling.

    You've got a lot of booze happening on the same plate.  Maybe just vermouth, water and a few herbs in the court buillon?

    You sound interesting -- although I hope you can clean up your spelling and grammar enough to be more understandable.  The brother's advice doesn't sound so good.  Not to me, anyway.
    To my mind, using vodka as flavor is a way spending a lot of money on water.  On the one hand, it gets you around the "too much booze" problem.  On the other, it's kind of pointless. 

    I'd go some other way.  Tequila, rum, or gin would be better choices.  If you poach in vermouth, gin is an obvious choice.

    I don't know why he's suggesting a pink jelly to compliment a pink fish.  Does he? To continue the gin and vermouth conceit, you could suspend chopped olives and pimento in your aspic.  Salmon, poached or grilled, goes well with Spanish olives.  Can one say the same about beets?

    What do you mean by "a split?"
    Egg whites don't work that way, your tuilles will still smell of parmesan (or parmaggianao, if you prefer).  If you don't like the smell of parmesan, don't serve it.

    In any case, cheese crackers are a poor garnish for grilled or poached salmon.  It makes it seems as thougy you're showing off with the tuilles, doing something only because you can and not because it enhances the plate.

    You might, for instance, slice potatoes very thin lengthwise, sandwich herbs betwen two slices and either bake very hot or fry, to make crackers.
    My limited linguistic skills are overtaxed by your last sentence.  Are you suggesting or rebelling against a puree? 

    More wine/booze on the plate!?  Mais non! Nyet! Nein!  Iye!  No, no, no!  If you're paying for a cooking class, they are stealing your money, sir.  The thyme is OK, though.

    Fricasees are thickened at the very end of the cooking process, not at the beginning.  But that's just language.  If Aiden calls it a fricasee, who are we mere mortals to say?

    If you want to unite the beans with an already thick sauce, cook the beans off before doing so.  I'm not sure about white beans in a cream sauce, and really don't like the idea of cooking butter beans for any length of time in one.  A puree on the other hand...   Overall, a puree is not a bad idea.  And it gets some richness onto the plate.  

    But, the butter beans won't go with the potatoes I put on your plate.  Some editing is required.  It's your plate, not mine.  But stay away from the cheese tuilles please.

    Your plate lacks acid -- lemon, although a cliche, would be particularly welcome.  Perhaps a small mound of greens wilted in hot olive oil, and dressed with lemon?  A side plate of asparagus?

    Good luck,

    BDL
     
    Last edited: Sep 7, 2010
  3. simonlfcgreen

    simonlfcgreen

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    Cheers for the advice mate, Aiden's brother has worked in lots of great places. He is definately someone i trust big time. Sorry about how i write things this isn't my strongest department. Anyways its all me basicly Louis has just offered a few twists. I have been in the game for a few months. haha so obvious lack of experience showing. I have no choice in the matter haha Louis has said i have to make it now He said or i wont learn. If there is anything wrong with it. My thoughts was Salmon and Vodka are a match made in heaven. And Butter beans and Parmazan speak for itself. Its a learning curve for me i want to be the best. By Fricasse i just meant a thick sauce.

    See Salmon is very fishy as you know very powerful flavour.

    Then you have Vodka which is very Sharp

    The idea of the parmazan was to mingle the sharpness and i wouldnt know what flavour you call Parmazan but its very Distinct almost like a salt here you have different textures aswell as for Beetroot im not entirely sure about it Loius sugested that Personaly my pallete isnt yet up to standards to taste the flavours in a beetroot jelly.

    Butter Bean sauce soft sweetish then the time gives it thatfeeling where you feel like you are smelling it with your mouth as for acid lemons was apart of the garnish along with baby basil.