Oil For Cutting Board

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by shel, Jun 16, 2007.

  1. free rider

    free rider

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    Oh no, did you really say that? I have a terrible Ikea addiction and there happens to be one less that two miles from my house. Now I have an excuse to head over there. :blush:
     
  2. jannie

    jannie

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    How can I possibly be alive, I have used a wood cutting board just about every day of my adult life, I never treated it at all with the exception of using a wet sponge, or a wet sponge with dish detergent until probably the last ten years when I started using pharmacy grade mineral oil. To date I've never had a problem, never gotten sick. How can this be?

    Now I'm crazy clean, terrified to tears of raw chicken, pork and beef, almost to the point of stopping eating them except in restaurants.

    I feel guilty every time I put one of my lovely Berndes skillets on the burner, wondering if it will attack me with cancer cells. When I choose instead a beautiful Mauviel stainless lined copper skillet, I feel guilty for my cholesterol as I barely cover it's surface with either canola oil or olive oil.

    Some days I'm deep into a cooking magazine and fall in love with a photo of something I just have to try, but I read the ingredients and decline, because you know (even though I recenty had great results from an annual physical, eccocardiogram/stress test, bone scan and mamogram, I'm becoming afraid of everything I like to eat.

    And now I'm to be afraid of what I cut my tomatos on?

    HELP:beer:

    During the last months of my mothers life, she had a large TV in front of the hospital bed that played the cooking channel 24 hours of the day. I would sit there watching it realizing there was very little there that I "should" actually eat. Too much, salt, too much fat/oil.

    I was cooking for my mom who had lukemia, one time out of habbit when she wanted something she'd seen on TV, I answered back, "mom, that's kind of fattening", she laughed and said "it doesn't matter now, I can eat anything I want". And we did.

    What's happened, is it really all that much worse than the world I grew up in?

    Jannie
     
  3. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I guess there is a big difference between cooking for yourself and family, and cooking for strangers, in order to make a living.

    Family won't make excuses not to pay for food because of percieved health code violations, they won't sic the health dept. after you, and they won't go "halvsies" with lawyers looking for a easy buck because of health code violations.

    In short, there are a million slime balls out there, with a million different scams, all looking to make an easy buck from restaurants. Following the health code provides a good amount of protection. Is it overkill? In some cases, probably. But then, for hospitals, care homes, etc, feeding sick people or people with extremely weak immune systems, it isn't overkill, just very good sense. Will I stake my business, career, and reputation by ignoring the overkill? No.
     
  4. foodpump

    foodpump

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    I guess there is a big difference between cooking for yourself and family, and cooking for strangers, in order to make a living.

    Family won't make excuses not to pay for food because of percieved health code violations, they won't sic the health dept. after you, and they won't go "halvsies" with lawyers looking for a easy buck because of health code violations.

    In short, there are a million slime balls out there, with a million different scams, all looking to make an easy buck from restaurants. Following the health code provides a good amount of protection. Is it overkill? In some cases, probably. But then, for hospitals, care homes, etc, feeding sick people or people with extremely weak immune systems, it isn't overkill, just very good sense. Will I stake my business, career, and reputation by ignoring the overkill? No.
     
  5. luc_h

    luc_h

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    (empty)
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2015
  6. jannie

    jannie

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    It makes a lot of sense Luc, thanks.
    Jannie:bounce:
     
  7. mikelm

    mikelm

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    Thanks for the explication, Luc!

    Mike :cool:
     
  8. m brown

    m brown

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    got blurry at all the posts,
    the beauty of the wood board is you can sand it down every once in a while.
    i use veg oil, but these are my cheepo boards.

    anyhoo, happy slicing! dicing and mincing!
     
  9. ikki

    ikki

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    My wife's cooking tastes like I'm eating linoleum anyway, so I'd be used to it.
     
  10. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    For mineral oil, you can get a gallon of it very cheap at the local tack and feed store even though it may not be USP grade.  And it's what I've always used on both my cutting boards and oil stones for knife sharpening.
     
  11. galley swiller

    galley swiller

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    Can't say I need a gallon.

    But just the other week I bought a pint (16 fl. oz.) at my local Safeway store for $3.49 plus sales tax.  Found it in the drug area.  Food grade.

    Galley Swiller
     
  12. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Since my stones are really large, at least eleven inches in length, I need lots of oil for cleaning and floating the swarf away.
     
  13. l1spain

    l1spain

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    Can one use sesame oil on a cutting board?
     
  14. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Sesame oil smells funny and goes rancid very fast.  Bad choice.
     
  15. kokopuffs

    kokopuffs

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    Any food oil will turn rancid and impart a bad odor to your board.  Use food grade mineral oil or mineral oil mixed with a bit of beeswax, approx 1-2cc beeswax per 500cc mineral oil.
     
    Last edited: Jul 11, 2014
  16. chris bruce

    chris bruce

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    food grade mineral oi
     
  17. wernight

    wernight

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    Thanks for the chemical explanation. I did put a bit of flaxseed oil (before knowing about mineral oil), so I'll have to see if it rances and/or becomes sticky. It does sound however that if it creates a plastic like substance that would create a waterproof cover on top of the wood while the oil should still nourish a bit. I don't have experience yet in it, so I wonder what people experienced using non-mineral oils.
     
  18. wernight

    wernight

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    After find a really good site in French (https://artdec.ca/blog/6/finition-et-entretien-dune-planche-a-decouper-dun-bloc-de-boucher-ou-dun-pl) and many more quality resources:

    • Use mineral oil (pharmacy or food grade) together with melted beeswax (to keep longer). You can use either alone as well. It'll however last less long than other solutions.

    • Tung oil (aka China wood oil) “L'huile d'abrasin” is one of the best if you want it to polymerize (siccative oils polymerize in the air spontaneously creating a strong protection layer)

    • Flaxseed oil is also ok (don't use lindseed oil which is toxis) but you need to let it dry for about 5 days. It'll give a more darker and antique look with time.

    • Do not use olive oil (or most other cooking oils), it’ll get rancid and sticky under certain conditions
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015
  19. millionsknives

    millionsknives

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    A thin layer of flaxseed should polymerize.  It is sold as linseed oil to finish projects if you are a woodworker.  Raw linseed oil is food safe.  Boiled linseed oil has additives that are not food safe.

    Here I use flaxseed oil on my knife handle


    It leaves a shiny, smooth, water resistant finish.  Not gummy, real slick. RAw linseed takes 4+ days to dry and polymerize.  Boiled will dry faster maybe a few hours.

    Anyway for cutting boards, I don't want a smooth surface.  I use a 5:1 mixture of mineral oil:beeswax.  Just mix it together on a double boiler so it doesn't get too hot
     
    Last edited: Jul 22, 2015
  20. chickenwings

    chickenwings

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    Years ago we had a major kitchen renovation and I had (Oh I HAD!) a butcher block built into the counter about 3.5 feet long and the depth of the counter...oh it was GLORIOUS.  We had recommended to us at the time Terra Nova NaturOil and I loved it.  IT turned the block a bit darker but absorbed well, didn't stick, didn't go bad, didn't add any flavours and for home use lasted quite well...I'd oil the block about every quarter - flip it over and use the other side - in three months I'd oil the side I was using, flip it over and go for another three months.  By the time I got to use the  recently oiled side the oil was so nicely absorbed as to be invisible.  Great stuff.