oil basting chicken

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by dagger, Feb 21, 2019.

  1. dagger

    dagger

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    Most people coat their chicken in oil then spices and let sit thinking spices will penatrate the meat. I wondering if the oil blocks the spices creating a barrier and is their something better.
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    i don't know where you get the idea that most people coat their chicken in oil. That's not my experience at all.

    Penetration of flavor is generally low on whole thick cuts, yes. Similar problem as marination. Chicken skin is also fairly impermeable.

    And, yes, more flavors are water soluble than oil soluble.
     
    Last edited: Feb 21, 2019
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  3. mike9

    mike9

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    I never oil, or butter my chicken - the skin never browns - it's not turkey. I just dry it in the icebox then seasoning and they come out crispy. I salt liberally with and pepper - maybe some thyme - comes out great every time.
     
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  4. Transglutaminase

    Transglutaminase

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    I, umm, sometimes use oil in the marinade for piri-piri chicken, but then again it's often pumped.
    And baked &/or deep fried ..
     
  5. patblue

    patblue

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    Would not oil a chicken - generally we prepare the chicken sous vide, add the spices right into the bag. This way the chicken does retain slightly more flavor

    If you want it browned - fry skin side down after removing it from the sous vide

    Had no complaints so far...
     
  6. dagger

    dagger

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    Watch you tube most everyone first coats the chicken then mixes in spices tossing in a bowl. I used to do this until i began to think the oil would coat the meat blocking the spices. Oil to me is for browning since it will fry when it gets hot and its used to keep things from sticking. To me it would close or clog meat pours not penetrate or open them
     
  7. french fries

    french fries

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    Are you talking about a whole chicken, with skin on? If yes then the skin would block the spices from going any further inside the chicken, oil or not oil.
     
  8. dagger

    dagger

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    No, thighs, breasts skin @ skinless, legs and so on
     
  9. morning glory

    morning glory

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    I don't think the oil stops the flavour. I sometimes use plain yoghurt (not very low fat type) mixed with spices such as turmeric, chilli powder etc. as a marinade, then bake.
     
  10. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    You can find a youtube video for anything these days.

    Oiling chicken parts only causes more splatter if you are pan frying the chicken and does very little in terms of allowing whatever seasoning you're using to penetrate the meat, especially with skin on chicken. The oil does nothing in terms of creating a good flavor profile for the chicken, either. The only thing accomplished by coating the chicken with oil is whatever herbs and spices you're using will fry in the oil coating and taste bad. Herbs and seasonings, especially powdered seasonings like Paprika, onion powder, garlic powder etc generally do not taste good when they've been fried.

    Then, there is the potential problem created if you are using oils with low smoke points. When those oils reach their smoke point in the pan or oven, they will give your chicken a bitter taste.

    If you want your chicken to turn out juicy and flavorful, brine your chicken with a bit of kosher salt making sure to get the salt under the skin. Let it set in the fridge for a few hours uncovered and unwrapped. Once your chicken has dry brined for a few hours, rinse away any excess salt, pat dry with paper towels and let the chicken come up to room temp. Cooking cold chicken, especially if you are deep frying it or roasting it in the oven, will likely produce a dry exterior and an under-cooked center.

    Seasoning your chicken with salt just a few minutes before cooking will only pull moisture from the meat while in the pan or oven and cause the outer layers of the chicken to steam rather than sear denying you that good crust or crispy skin.

    As for marinades, that's another debate altogether.

    Good luck. :)
     
  11. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Wow, looks like I disagree with everyone today hehe

    Maybe from me? I'm greek, we cook everything in olive oil.

    I always oil my chicken when roasting whole. It always comes out crispy. I wonder why yours doesnt.

    Indeed, animals do not have the ability to open or close their pores after they've died.

    This gets a big eye roll from me. Dry brining is a real thing and it really works. Wet brining? Meh
     
  12. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    I'm wasn't talking about dry brining. I was talking about simply seasoning the chicken with salt just before it goes into the pan or oven, which is vastly different that dry brining.
     
  13. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Just saying I don’t buy into it. Why wouldn’t wet brining draw out moisture? Why wouldn’t dry brining draw out moisture? Why does salting food result in steaming chicken? It doesn’t, that’s just overcrowding.
     
  14. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    I never said that dry or wet brining wouldn't draw out moisture. That's silly. I think you may have misread my comment.

    However, Salting any protein just prior to putting it into a hot pan or oven will draw out moisture. That moisture will steam in the pan or oven and will often hinder browning.

    Of course, both dry and wet brining draw out moisture. The difference, of course, is with dry/wet brining, the moisture is drawn out over several hours before cooking which firms up the protein and lower moisture content makes it easier to brown. Salting pulls out the moisture in the pan.

    When you sautee onions, you generally add salt, right?. That salt draws out the moisture. That moisture evaporates in the pan and leaves behind that delicious fond.

    To your point about overcrowding, indeed, that hinders the browning process, too.
     
  15. mike9

    mike9

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    @koukouvagia - Ummm . . . what makes you think my chickens aren't crispy? :rofl::rofl::rofl:
     
  16. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    Well you said "I never oil, or butter my chicken - the skin never browns" which I gather it means that you've tried oil or butter with the result of it not browning.
     
  17. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    I think seasoning before you cook is important. Seasoning after something is cooked just doesn’t taste good to me.
     
  18. chefross

    chefross

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    I've done research that dispels some of this.
    When salting a protein, the meat will release liquid within the first hour and then will re-absorb it and use it to tenderize the meat.
    Allowing skin-on chicken to sit salted for a couple hours is a better way to do it.

    Also as far a frying chicken pieces. Any moisture on the skin will not allow said skin to crisp. Anything wet, will not brown and will most likely stick to the pan as well.
     
  19. mike9

    mike9

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    Oh crap - that was poor context on my part - :oops:. Yes what I meant to say was "I never oil, or butter [when I did it never browned] it's not a turkey". Meaning it doesn't cook as long as a turkey so it doesn't get brown.

    I look for 4# chickens - 5# tops they take @ 1 hour at 425F and are very crisp. I liberally season then air dry them, bring to room temp, season again then roast.
     
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  20. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Salt, pepper and leave uncovered in fridge all day. Brown [with oil] in a pan, enough to get some color, bake. I do thighs all the time like this, easier than whole chicken, works with breasts too of course. The skin quality is vastly superior to ordinary baking, texture better than Peking duck I've had. definitely try with turkey.

    I imagined I thought this up free of outside influence, though someone must have done this already, and actually there was an French chef on Iron chef I recall now who did some browning in a ceramic dutch oven pan in preparation for coating with an almond paste. Judges raved about it. Both were said to be techniques known in France.
     
    Last edited: Mar 1, 2019