Oh no, another holiday!!!

Discussion in 'The Late Night Cafe (off-topic)' started by cape chef, Dec 2, 2000.

  1. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Tommorrow we cut down our xmas tree or Hanukah bush. The lights will be strung the Manorah dusted off, the garland laid out and the dreidels placed with care, the suger canes will get hung and the Geilt (sp?)will be resurfasing.I can't believe we are back again to this nutty time of year!! Where did the time go? We just finished our leftovers from Thanksgiving and now it's onto the biggy holidays.So whats everybody thinking about making for there special holiday? What are your traditions? What are your favorites?
    Is there another uncle Bob lurking in the shadows for the upcoming season of good will?
    When will we find the time?how will we afford everything? Will we be able to see everyone we promised we would last year? Will Santa and hanukah Harry take good care of our children?
    As for me, I think I will pull down my pants and slide on the ice!! Slow down,cool down,enjoy my family, eat like a pig,cook like a slave and say I will never do this again Never never never!! Ok Until next year [​IMG][​IMG]
    cc
    Oh by the way Happy Holidays [​IMG]
     
  2. m brown

    m brown

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    Dude, I am so with you on this one. I have cleared out everything so next week is my last killer week. I will only do the restaurant (and cheftalk, but that ain't work) for the holidays leaving me time for the family.
    I posted a menu the other day looking for some helpful hints!
    as far as affording the holidays, nfw, that is why we work like dogs!
    Clearing out the house of the past few years of junk and junk mail, that is my goal, for the Christmas tree needs a space and the trains need a space and I need some space!!!!
    I would like to include more traditions this season, more light. we'll see. Bought the old fashion ceramic lights for the tree this year, brings me back in the way back machine to younger days......... there was an uncle bob type in my past, but alas, he moved.(just an old weird uncle) no good stories to tell.... maybe that is a good thing [​IMG]
    happy holidays to all and to all a good night!
    what ever you celebrate, do so with gusto!
     
  3. isa

    isa

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    I am sorry to say that the uncle Bob of our family will be spending Christmas with us. Christian Charity my step-mother says. Maybe so but the stories are getting old and the constant criticism harder to take...
     
  4. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    We don't have a blended holiday season at our house, like cape chef, so it's just December with a little Chanukah thrown in. My nod to that holiday will be one very small batch of potato latkes (with sour cream), and that's about it. We have no kids, so that makes things simpler, although less interesting. We'll be in Naples, Florida at the end of the month, so there's no partying- just sauntering on the beach with family. Instead of finding the nearest Chinese restaurant on Christmas Eve, I'll hit a good meat place I know of in Naples and make some veal piccata or marsala or something. Or, if we're lucky, my doctor/cook brother will invite us over to his place for something scrumptious that night. I may find a goose to roast for New Year's when we get back. It just sounds really good to me, maybe with pommes Anna and .... any suggestions?
     
  5. isa

    isa

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    Mezzaluna,


    You could try doing the goose the French way with chestnuts, it's very traditional. I never tried it myself though.

    I'm doing a turkey with pomme duchesse and green beans. Very traditional. I wonder if my family would go for goose. It would be great with red cabbage.
     
  6. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Sisi, the chestnuts sound wonderful. As for cutting the fat, oh well. The goose is worth it! My grandmother used to save the fat in a jar and use it in potato kugels, stuffing, or for frying eggs, etc. And, being on a low-carb plan of eating, I don't have to watch out for fat at all, so I'll really enjoy the gilt goose without guilt! (Sorry, I couldn't resist)
     
  7. cape chef

    cape chef

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    Oh Mezzaluna, Potato Kugel!!! I think every jewish grandmother did that. You just gave me a wonderful memory of my grandparents. I can still smell the wonderful aromas coming from my grandmothers tiny kitchen and my grandfather baking away in his bakery. Challah,bagels and yes the beast bialeys i have ever tasted. Funny how a word or two can spark a wonderful memory. Hears to potato kugel [​IMG]
    cc
     
  8. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Yeah, cc, and my grandmother said it wasn't good "unless the schmaltz drips from the beard". Final note: none of my relatives on that side of the family died of heart disease!
     
  9. cape chef

    cape chef

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    [​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]
    cc
     
  10. isa

    isa

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    Potato Kugel?? Schmaltz??? Please enlight me.
     
  11. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    schmaltz...rendered poultry fat usually chicken used as flavoring or as a frying agent or glup as a butter alternative...

    Potato kugel...potatos, onions creamy mixtrue baked...usually noodle kugel is sweet but used in a meal as a starch.

    I get it right guys?
     
  12. isa

    isa

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    The things I learn here never stop to amaze me. If I go to the grocery and ask for schmaltz will people know what I am talking about?


    Thanks Shroomgirl
     
  13. shroomgirl

    shroomgirl

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    Yep something to cut the fat....beet salad...ala look under the fondue thread.
     
  14. mezzaluna

    mezzaluna

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    Not likely, Sisi. If you ask for chicken fat, the butcher should give you some or sell it to you for next to nothing in price. I actually save it up from chickens I've bought, storing the fat globs in the freezer until I have a chunk about the size of two fists- never weighed it before! Let the fat thaw if it's frozen. Put it in a saucepan with one large onion, slivered. Cover the pan and let the fat render over low/medium heat. No need to add water if you keep an eye on it. When the liquid fat is golden and the cracklings and onions are well-browned but not burned, strain the liquid into a jar or other heatproof container. Let it cool, then refrigerate or freeze. It will last a very long time under refrigeration, and a very long time indeed in the freezer if closely wrapped. Use the schmaltz in savory dishes such as kugels, frying potato pancakes (part cooking oil, part schamltz for flavor) and so on. Savory noodle kugels contain no dairy products so they can be served with meat (in accordance with the Kosher dietary laws). The cracklings are good in mashed potatoes, noodle kugels, knishes, kasha varnishkes (cooked kasha with bowtie noodles) and lots of other dishes. I'm salivating now, so I've got to go! [​IMG]

    [This message has been edited by Mezzaluna (edited 12-04-2000).]
     
  15. isa

    isa

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    Wow Mezzaluna thanks for the explanation. I'll try that next time I buy a chicken.