off-traditional Christmas meal

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by helga, Nov 5, 2013.

  1. helga

    helga

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    What is your favorite off-traditional Christmas meal?
     
  2. laurenlulu

    laurenlulu

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    Marinara and lemon topped crabmeat stuffed Red Snapper, oyster dressing, Spinach Madeline, shrimp salad (shrimp, green onion, celery, mayo, dill, lemon, Old Bay) and shrimp/crab boudin (stays soft when precooked) stuffed squid which are sauteed in garlic butter.

    Can you tell we like seafood? /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  3. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    This year I'm serving Thanksgiving dinner for Christmas.  Turkey, sweet potatoes, cranberry sauce, stuffing, pumpkin dessert, corn pudding etc.
     
  4. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Karen's family does that every year.  I keep hinting about hams, roast beef and yorkshire pudding, all to no avail.

    My favorite Christmas dinner is in the movie "A Christmas Story" where they end up going out to eat.

    mjb.
     
  5. ishbel

    ishbel

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    My family wouldn't allow me to veer from the traditional UK Christmas meal. The only variation allowed is to alternate geese and turkey each year,

    Last year I forgot to make bread sauce... The disappointment expressed by everyone was amazing..all the more so as the only one round the table who likes it is my husband!:D
     
  6. koukouvagia

    koukouvagia

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    My family is not very large and most of us live scattered in different countries.  Mostly I spend holidays with the inlaws who never veer from their weekly menu let alone their holiday menu.  But I'm the complete opposite, I never serve the same thing on holidays.  Every year it's gotta be something different.  I've never cooked Thanksgiving dinner before and though it's not my favorite food holiday it's got to go into rotation sometime.  But a UK Christmas sounds really good about now.  I've never made yorkshire pudding.
     
  7. eastshores

    eastshores

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    I don't typically cook the meal per se. I do have a bit of a tradition in creating appetizers and joining our neighbors family for a block party. I've done mini juicy lucys, mini BLTs, shrimp crostinis, cucumber and crab, etc. We decided to fry the turkey one year and since then that is the only way we cook it. Last year we brined the turkey and my buddy had added some brown suger in the brine which made the turkey burn a little on the skin.
     
  8. siduri

    siduri

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    I guess the first question is what is traditional. 
    most italians celebrate christmas eve with a huge fish dinner.  For me fish dinner is not christmas.  Christmas eve we eat whatever is on hand because everyone is busy wrapping presents and getting ready for christmas dinner. 

    Our christmas dinner as a kid was home made ravioli (with meat, spinach and cheese stuffing) in meat sauce, roast turkey or beef or capon, roast potatoes, artichokes with tomato, string bean pudding (with bechamel and parmigiano) and several deserts: rice pie, ricotta pie, befana cookies.  Is that traditional or not traditional?  I don;t know, depends on your tradition i guess. 

    I have turkey at my christmas party, because it feeds a lot of people and is relatively cheap, and nobody roasts a whole turkey here.  But on our family dinner at xmas i prefer a really good roast beef.  I would LOVE to have goose, which i've never tasted, but in rome they just don;t sell them!

    My mother in law, after the fish dinner the night before, would make a soup that was handed down in the family called zuppa a la sante'  which takes cardoons, peeled and chopped, cooked in chicken broth, served over toasted dry bread and little meatballs, and then would make chicken (pieces) and peppers
     
  9. ishbel

    ishbel

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    And yet... Weren't geese used by ancient Romans as 'guard dogs'? How odd it is not available nowadays. I prefer goose to turkey, but bow to family preferences. :p
     
  10. teamfat

    teamfat

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    I used to use a phrase to indicate my level of stress - sweating like an overweight goose on Christmas Eve.  Not many folks understood.

    And Koukouvagia, do try a yorkshire pudding some day.  It is sort of like a single layer puff pastry that demands to be slathered in gravy and meat drippings.

    mjb.
     
  11. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Yorkshirepudding is light and wonderful! I make toad in the hole, served with onion gravry. Yum!

    I don't think it is anything like puff pastry. :D;):D
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2013
  12. kaiquekuisine

    kaiquekuisine

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    I remember eating lasagna various times during christmas.....

    I think my mother when i was a kid had even done a christmas meal based around meat and potatoes. 

    Basically dont do anything fancy during christmas , because either im working <_< or tired from work. 

    So a lasagna to me is perfect :p

    My mother lasagna though was great....

    Layered sauce first , then pasta , ham ( oh god ham ) , cheese , ground beef with sauce , more sauce and pasta ..... 3 full layers of heaven , now my mouth is watering.....
     
    Last edited: Nov 8, 2013
  13. siduri

    siduri

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    Yes, Rome was apparently saved from some early invasion by the geese on Campidoglio (one of the hills, that became the capital hill) making a ruckus when the invaders showed up and waking the guards. 

    Unfortunately, i only found one store that had them, ordered one for christmas one year, and it was smaller than a duck and cost like a kilo of good beef, with much less meat.  So though i technically did have "goose" i can only actually say i ate gosling. 
     
  14. siduri

    siduri

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    It's more like a choux paste (cream puff paste) baked in a roasting pan, isn't it?

    Is toad in the hole made with yorkshire pudding base?  Can you give us your recipe, gravy included. Ishbel?
     
  15. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Okay, maybe puff pastry wasn't the best analogy, but I was trying to think how to describe how "light and wonderful" it can be.

    I think I know what to do for sunday dinner this weekend.

    mjb.
     
  16. cerise

    cerise Banned

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    LOL.  Mine too. Chinese Turkey.

     
  17. cerise

    cerise Banned

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    I vote for Prime Rib.

     
  18. dillbert

    dillbert Banned

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    fascinating question, but as noted - "tradition" is extremely defined by location.

    found this, sorting out the entries, one can find "the main course"

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Christmas_dishes

    once upon a century ago, I decided to go for the "Christmas goose" tradition.

    found a local "meat&poultry" shop - ILG - north of Phila - very well thought of / highly recommended.

    GPS / maps / orienteering skills helpful.  not exactly at the corner of . . .

    so I goes and sez I want to order a fresh goose for Christmas.

    answer:  December is not a good time to slaughter geese - they suggested I go with a frozen bird, previously slaughtered at peak time.

    curiously and as most people may have noticed, the conditions of "December" is not established by calendar. 

    December in Australia is somewhat alightly different that December in Canada.....

    the geese have adapted; people fixed on tradition may not have adapted.

    so we did a thawed/previously frozen goose.

    if you experienced a duck that had some  fat, you ain't seen nothing.

    very rich on the fat content, very slim on the edible meat content.

    absolutely delicious, what of there was.....
     
  19. ishbel

    ishbel

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    Well, all I can say in the land of a Charles Dicken's Christmas meal, OUR geese are raised to be oven ready for Christmas. And I absolutely Hate frozen meats. You haven't experienced heaven until you eat potatoes roasted in duck fat:D
     
  20. teamfat

    teamfat

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    Every time I go to Southeast Market on a weekend and see the roasted ducks, head on, hanging in the warming box I think of this scene.

    mjb.