NY STYLE PIZZA

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Joined Sep 28, 2018
Looking for recipes, suggestions. Ordered some ALL TRUMPS flour and dry yeast. I've ben told that is the way to go. Thoughts?
 
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Joined Jan 4, 2011
Get some of the cardboard rounds that go under take-out pizzas. ... Paint on some ketchup. ... Squirt on some canned spray cheese-spread. ... Sprinkle on some chopped up old left-over lunch-meat. ... Steam it until it's soggy and foldable. ... Cut it into pieces too big to not eat like a slob.

... There you go.
 

pete

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Joined Oct 7, 2001
I am sure that I am going to get crucified for this, but having lived in both cities I have to say that I have a love for both NY and Chicago style. I think both styles, although extremely different, are both awesome. That being said, I really dislike the super thin, cracker style crust that is prevalent where I now live in Wisconsin. I also can't stand so called "pan" or Sicilian style with the super thick, bread-like crust that soaks up about a pint of grease, which, for the uninitiated, is very different from Chicago style deep dish.
 
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Joined Jan 19, 2014
I am sure that I am going to get crucified for this, but having lived in both cities I have to say that I have a love for both NY and Chicago style. I think both styles, although extremely different, are both awesome. That being said, I really dislike the super thin, cracker style crust that is prevalent where I now live in Wisconsin. I also can't stand so called "pan" or Sicilian style with the super thick, bread-like crust that soaks up about a pint of grease, which, for the uninitiated, is very different from Chicago style deep dish.

I'm on a different page than you. I dislike the heavy as lead Chicago style, but do enjoy pan style if done right. The Sicilian pan near me is usually just sauce and dough and is often sold cold by the slice, so it's more like bread than pizza. The more traditional pan pizza is generally referred to as "Greek Pizza" and can be quite excellent with a crispy and sturdy oiled crust. New Haven style pizza, with a thin charred crust, is generally coal fired and awesome, as is Boston style brick oven. NY is okay but tends to be be too floppy as noted. The secret to ALL of the famous pies, whether it's Regina's in Boston, Joey's in Brooklyn, Pepe's in New Haven etc. is the decades old seasoned ovens. Can't quantify that fact in any recipe. Even the pizza you get at the original Uno's in Chicago is nothing like the Uno's at the local mall.
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
I'm on a different page than you. I dislike the heavy as lead Chicago style, but do enjoy pan style if done right. The Sicilian pan near me is usually just sauce and dough and is often sold cold by the slice, so it's more like bread than pizza. The more traditional pan pizza is generally referred to as "Greek Pizza" and can be quite excellent with a crispy and sturdy oiled crust. New Haven style pizza, with a thin charred crust, is generally coal fired and awesome, as is Boston style brick oven. NY is okay but tends to be be too floppy as noted. The secret to ALL of the famous pies, whether it's Regina's in Boston, Joey's in Brooklyn, Pepe's in New Haven etc. is the decades old seasoned ovens. Can't quantify that fact in any recipe. Even the pizza you get at the original Uno's in Chicago is nothing like the Uno's at the local mall.
And that's why there are so many styles-so many different tastes. But ultimately, I am right and you are not!!!!:lol::rofl::lol: JK!!!!
 
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Joined Jan 19, 2014
And that's why there are so many styles-so many different tastes. But ultimately, I am right and you are not!!!!:lol::rofl::lol: JK!!!!


Yeah...except, no. Nobody with any taste truly considers those Chicago dough casseroles qualifying as pizza. Nope.
 
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Joined Dec 23, 2004
Get some of the cardboard rounds that go under take-out pizzas. ... Paint on some ketchup. ... Squirt on some canned spray cheese-spread. ... Sprinkle on some chopped up old left-over lunch-meat. ... Steam it until it's soggy and foldable. ... Cut it into pieces too big to not eat like a slob.

... There you go.


Oh, snap!:lol::rofl:
 
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Joined Dec 2, 2017
Crazy Americans. Brooklyn, Boston, or Chicago style Pizza. Still arguing like fleas on a Dog. I like to watch you argue while eating my Apizza. The best pizza I had was at the my wife's family Campana (Countryside farm) in Italy. Everything local and fresh. Everything HERE is just a facsimile. Forget about it!!!! :)
 
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Joined Feb 8, 2009
Crazy Americans. Brooklyn, Boston, or Chicago style Pizza. Still arguing like fleas on a Dog. I like to watch you argue while eating my Apizza. The best pizza I had was at the my wife's family Campana (Countryside farm) in Italy. Everything local and fresh. Everything HERE is just a facsimile. Forget about it!!!! :)

Dennis, going back in the 50's and 60's in Bridgeport, Ct and surrounding areas they called it Apizza. I remember my Dad coming through the front door yelling I got the "ahbeets"...... There was one Apizza place I would walk in to order and yell Jerry, I need a Large Apizza with extra "Ska MOTES".....The Italians coming to America used the word Scamozza because it was the closest thing they knew to Mozzarella cheese that was used in America..... The main thing with everything in Italy is always using fresh. It's also not really about toppings. It's all about a good crust, sauce and cheese....Bill
 
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In my trips to Italy I have had pizza that was really good and some not so good, same as here in the USA.
 
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