nuevo latino

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by cesarzap, Jan 11, 2002.

  1. cesarzap

    cesarzap

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    hi, who has some good ideas or recipes on nuevo latino cuisine
     
  2. rachel

    rachel

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    :confused: What exactly is Nuevo Latino food?
     
  3. marmalady

    marmalady

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    Rachael,

    I think it's just using Latin ingredients in a 'new' kicked up kind of way. Check your library - there are a few cookbooks out there on this cuisine; also a couple of shows on Food TV that feature this cooking (or get up on their website). I love it!
     
  4. rachel

    rachel

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    Thanks Marmalady, but I don't live in the US, so I don't know what programes web-sites to look for!!
    is it basically taking the ingredients of Mexican cooking and using them differently? I do remember hearing about La Nueva Cocina Cubana that was in Miami, but I never saw any recipes for them
     
  5. marmalady

    marmalady

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    Ooops! Sorry, Rachael, didn't notice your location!

    Yes, basically nuevo latino is taking the same ingredients of latino cuisine, and combining them in new ways and dishes.

    Food TV can be found at www.foodtv.com on the web.

    A couple of books I've liked are 'Nuevo Latino - Foods that celebrate the new Latin American cuisine' and 'Latin Ladles'; both can be found on Amazon.com.

    I can't think of any recipes off the top of my head - I'll search around and get some for you; can you get ingredients for Latin cooking (i.e., cilantro, chiles, etc.) in Scotland?

    BTW, my oldest son did the student travel around Europe thing when he was a junior in college; they went everywhere but Portugal and eastern Europe; his very favorite country was Scotland! He was astounded at its beauty. Also, my dad was in WWII, and stationed a while in Scotland - has pictures of Loch Ness, and always told me he had seen Nessie!

    Love to have some yummy Scottish salmon recipes if you have any hanging around!

    Happy cooking - Jackie
     
  6. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    Nuevo Latino cuisine came about as chefs started taking cuisines from different latin countries and combining them to make new combinations of foods. Such as dressing a cuban pork dish with a traditional Argentinian Chimichurri sauce or taking Argentinian grilled beef, wrapping it like a Mexican empanada and creating a dipping sauce out of a cuban mojo. Neuvo Latino cuisine basically takes these cuisines, which all have some similarities and combines them to create something new. It also will include the tenets of New Southwestern cooking in that it often introduces food items not traditionally found in these cuisines and incoroprates them.
     
  7. rachel

    rachel

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    Thank you for the information Pete, it sounds delicious
     
  8. jock

    jock

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    There is a Mexican restaurant called "Maya" a couple of blocks up the street from my office. They take South of the border ingredients and do the most fabulous things with them. No spicy stuff though, oddly enough.
    If that's nuevo liatino cuisine, give me more.

    Jock
     
  9. pete

    pete Moderator Staff Member

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    I am surprised that there is no spiciness to it. Heat is an intergral part of many latino dishes. Not all dishes, but many. That would be like eating Indian food that didn't have any spiciness to it. It could be they are just using heat very carefully to see how the public reacts and then plan on kicking it up as people get accostomed to it. Next time you go in ask them to turn the heat up on it. It doesn't need to "burn your face off" but many latino dishes should make you start to sweat a little, after a few bites.
     
  10. jock

    jock

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    When I said no spicy stuff, that wasn't strictly true. There is some but it is generally mild and not so extensively used as you would expect in Mexican cooking.
    It could be that the Mayans did not use hot spices as much as modern day Mexicans do. It might be interesting to research the history of Mayan cooking to find out.

    Jock
     
  11. rachel

    rachel

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    Sounds like a job for Athenaeus, Jock!!!!:)
     
  12. athenaeus

    athenaeus

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    Ok.
    As Nicko would say... pass me the mike.

    :cool:
     
  13. rachel

    rachel

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    On a different vein from the Mayan cooking topic, Nuevo latino cooking may about to be influenced in a big way Argentinian cooking as soon as enough chefs can get their own money out of the bank to get themselves on a plane to escape from 'the biggest bankruptcy in history' :(
     
  14. rachel

    rachel

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    p.S. i 've just realised that we've all got sidetracked (just for a change. . .) and no one has answered poor Cesarzap's original question. . .I can't answer it (not living in a hotbed of Nuevo Latino Cooking), could someone else??
     
  15. marmalady

    marmalady

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    To Rachael and Cesarzap - See my post of 1-12 for Food TV website and a couple of good books on Nuevo Latino. On the Food TV website, go to the 'shows and recipes' site, then find "Melting Pot" or "My Country, My Food"; there are a couple of chefs who do 'Nuevo Latino' on both those shows, and their recipes are listed.

    As far as I understand it, Nuevo Latino is taking the basic ingredients of Latino cuisine - not necessarily just Mexican, but all of Latin America - like cilantro, plaintains, rice, beans, spices, chiles, etc., and putting them together in new and exciting ways.

    This is being done in lots of international cuisines - we hear about British food being 'kicked up; I worked a class with a chef from Scotland a couple of years ago - he took a 'traditional' Scottish theme and came up with new ideas for using them - like gravlax made with Scotch and dill, and a dessert parfait of whiskey, honey and oats! In the same vein, Japanese chefs are using their traditional ingredients, and putting them together in ways that are new and different, but still keeping to the theme of their country's style of cooking.

    Hope this helps!

    BTW, guys, on the Mayan 'spicy' theme, I think traditional Mayan cooking was not so much hot-spicy, but just very flavorful; remember they were a culture that was completely run over by the conquistadores and much of their food culture has a lot of Spanish influence.
     
  16. athenaeus

    athenaeus

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    The use of spicies in Pre-Colombian America is a very interesting topic.
    In fact I am stydying about the culinary past of the States for the last two years.
    No I am not confusing States with pre-columbian america but in history of food we are talking with geographical terms.
    It's fascinating.
    But this topic is interesting as well and it would be a pity to burn it.

    I suggest we open a new thread about this.In fact I will do this now :)

    Returning to the original topic I would like to make a question.

    Is Olive-Oil considered a Nuevo Latino ingredient?
     
  17. jock

    jock

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    Olive oil in Latin American cooking? I wouldn't have thought so but whoever is in the kitchen makes up their own rules right? So why not.

    Jock:) :)
     
  18. rachel

    rachel

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    I would yes, Athenaeus. Southern Brazilians, Urugayans, Chileans and Argentinians (well if they can afford it now) all use olive oil in their cooking.
    Brazilians from Bahia use palm oil, bright colour, wonderful taste -cholesterol and calorific bomb.
    The differences between cooking in one part of Latin America and another are as big as the ones in Europe. It's impossible to put them together as one big mass
     
  19. marmalady

    marmalady

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    Re olive oil - In Mexican cooking, the most used oil is lard! This according to Rick Bayless, in "Authentic Mexican"; he also says that sunflower and safflower oil are pretty common, and in western Mexico, corn oil seems to be the most abundant. According to him, olive oil is not at all used, at least in 'public cooking'; most of the oil actually comes from Baja California, and is a heavier Spanish type olive oil which is usually mixed with another oil.