non-stick pans?

Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by Tyler520, Apr 25, 2019.

  1. Tyler520

    Tyler520

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    I seem to have terrible luck with non-stick pans. Even my nice all-clad pans didn't seem to last longer than a year before the finish began to flake and deteriorate and lose its non-stick qualities.

    anyone have any luck with any particular brands or types of nonstick pans, like those ceramic or stone coated ones or those GreenPans?
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I usually get three or fouor out of an inexpensive aluminum non stick pan
     
  3. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    Same here...

    But not long ago I replaced all of my frying pans with regular all-clad. Used properly there is no major sticking problem. Even my teen son can cook eggs in them without a problem. You might want to try a totally different approach.
     
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  4. halb

    halb

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    I agree. I don't even own a non-stick pan.
     
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  5. rick alan

    rick alan

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    2-3 years as phatch said, ceramic or teflon, though the slickness degrades noticeably within a year usually. I had a Kitchenaide teflon, very thick coating, that might have beat that but it got stolen! Over 2 years of use and it was going strong.

    Price doesn't seem to matter much, except in the thickness of the aluminum.

    I may try carbon as I am ready for new omelette pan, but hey, Walmart has some nice shaped non-sticks cheap.
     
  6. toddhicks209

    toddhicks209

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    Using cooking spray can help prevent sticking.
     
  7. Transglutaminase

    Transglutaminase

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    Had some high end pans but decided to buy some el-cheapos on Amazon.
    They worked great ..until I got an induction range.:(
    Can re-use the silicone handles on other pans also.
     
  8. Tyler520

    Tyler520

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    haven't had good luck with eggs or other delicate foods in my stainless pans - but maybe it's time for another attempt
     
  9. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Forget stainless, it simply doesn't season very well.
     
  10. Tyler520

    Tyler520

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    anodized aluminum then?
     
  11. french fries

    french fries

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    I've never seasoned a stainless steel pan, and use one for cooking eggs routinely. In fact I made several batches of eggs in the same stainless steel pan today for lunch.

    The trick is in the heating of the pan. I heat the pan VERY slowly and I'm not trying to reach any kind of searing temperature, when I put the butter there's no sound, it takes a while to melt the butter, then when I add the eggs there's a small amount of sizzling, nothing crazy, and most of the time the eggs slide right out of the pan, sometimes I need a bit of help from a metal spatula.
     
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  12. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Off course you can use low heat, but that kinda limits you.
     
  13. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    For eggs.

    For protein, high heat in a SS pan. More fond develops than with a Teflon pan. That either makes a pan sauce or soaks out quickly during clean-up. Clean-up does indeed take longer though.
     
  14. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Actually in some ways the best fond-producers were my worn Teflons. Once the surface gets scratched up a bit and is no longer truly non-stick, fond collects on them rather well, and with one great benefit.

    You can sear a steak, build up good fond, and when the raw side hits it the fond releases and coats. The fond builds again, and the juices now covering the first side release that batch when you flip. With just a little practice you you wind up with that wonderful fond embedded in a nice crust, quite unique from using any bare-metal pan. The little fond remaining comes right away with a few drops of liquid, liquid gold as GS would say.
     
    Last edited: Apr 27, 2019
  15. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Back to non-stick pans, there's lots of things you can't do without a non-stick or well seasoned carbon pan. Just one:

     
  16. french fries

    french fries

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    How so?

    It's not really about how hot the pan is but more about how fast you heat it up. I can fry an egg on high heat in stainless if I want to but that's normally not what I'm trying to do. But if I want to do that then I still start using very low heat to heat up the pan SLOWLY so that it heats up evenly. After a while you can become comfortable enough with stainless steel and you can sear your eggs if that's what you really want.

    I do remember having trouble with this in the past and as far as I remember the only thing I've changed is heating up my pan very slowly. On a gas burner I can't just use the low setting, which is typically too fast. I have to be somewhere between the high setting and the OFF setting, closer to OFF, just where you can barely see the flame. If I want to then sear something, after a while I increase the heat below the pan, but not right away. Once the pan has reached the desired temp I can add the fat.
     
  17. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Aside from the time factor, well again, try making that omelet above in a stainless pan. I know Jaques Pepin would not recommend it, even though he does not do his omelet quite the same (uses lower heat, less dramatic technique), though getting similar results.

    Some prep work requires a razor edge to accomplish, some cooking requires a non-stick pan.

    As Brian intimated, there is no real problem at all searing meat on stainless with roaring heat right from the getgo. I do do a quick seasoning of the pan first though, which of course takes practically no extra time as you are want that high heat anyway. Here it will behave practically like a non-stick pan.

    GS, if you know anybody ready to discard a Teflon pan after it's seen it's 2 or so years of use, I think you'd really like that steak preparation I described.
     
  18. french fries

    french fries

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    I agree that omelet would definitely be another challenge I haven't tried yet in a SS pan. I was thinking sunny side up eggs, not an omelet.
     
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  19. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    For omelette there really isn’t anything better than a well-seasoned carbon steel pan. French style or American style.