Non-Stick Pans that function at very high heats?

Discussion in 'Cooking Equipment Reviews' started by ntosaj, Oct 14, 2012.

  1. ntosaj

    ntosaj

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    Hey there guys!

    I was just wondering if anyone knows of any brands of non-stick, non-teflon cookware that can be used at high heat without poisoning anyone or blistering or what not. I've looked around and found some stuff on this coating called Thermolon? I that a possibility? I saw in Gordon Ramsay's "Ultimate Cookery Course" (yes, sorry I just went there) that he uses some odd looking dark pans but when I looked into it all I could find in relation to him were induction pans, the ones he used were being used on a gas stove so I'm gonna go on a limb and assume they weren't induction ;)

    Basically I'm looking for something non-stick that is very heat resistant, I don't want to cook with a lot of oil. As for seasoned steel, I do have a seasoned wok and cast-iron pan, but I'm looking for something different.

    Thanks a bunch guys!

    Nick
     
  2. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    cast iron and carbon steel are your best bets.
     
  3. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Umm, why?

    non stick pans are best used for egg dishes and maybe crepes, both of which don't need high heat.

    Searing is best done with a heavy pan, the heavier the material, the more heat it holds and the deeper the colour and crust on your item.  You don't need a lot of oil.

    Most, if not all non stick pans are made of stamped aluminum which will warp in an instant under high heat.
     
  4. ntosaj

    ntosaj

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    Thanks Phatch

    And foodpump,

    I was just thinking for searing veggies and fish, stir-frying veggies/sauteing (my parents hate the wok), basically I'm looking for something heat-resistant but that doesn't require a lot of fat (or any) or form a crust. I understand that crusts can lead to delicious flavour but we're looking for quick cleanup.

    I realize I might be looking for a mystical frying pan but I was just wondering if anyone might know more on the subject. Did read a bit on the forum about some swiss made pans with diamond dust coatings (sounds a bit whacky to me) but curious mostly!
     
     
  5. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Neither cast iron nor carbon steel are hard to clean up in my opinion. Just a bit harder than non stick and much easier than stainless.
     
  6. ntosaj

    ntosaj

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    I'm guessing that the issue too then is making sure they don't rust after (ie proper drying protocol, oiling, etc.). How do you go about it, what's your favorite?

    However, my family doesn't care for that kind of upkeep so I guess the search continues...
     
     
  7. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    The Cuisinart Hard Anodized skillets are supposedly oven safe up to 500 degrees (f).

    I have one that I've used on my (wimpy) gas stove on high heat for a couple of years now without any blistering.

    I don't know if they make a full range of cookware with that surface, though.

     
  8. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    I've never found hard anodized to be nonstick at all though. What it does do is make the surface non-reactive so you can cook tomatoes, wine and that sort of thing without off effects.
     
  9. ntosaj

    ntosaj

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    Thanks Terry! I'll look into it!

    Phatch: Non-reaction is definitely a plus, didn't even consider it, what effect would those have on cat-iron? I tend to use teflon, would they end up tasting odd? be discoloured?

    Ps. Anyone happen to know how hot pans tend to get on the highest setting of a burner? I know it can depend on the pan and the burner but a rough average would be nice, must be below 500?
     
    Last edited: Oct 15, 2012
  10. chicagoterry

    chicagoterry

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    I gave a link to a pan I don't own. The Cuisinart non-stick that I have is from the Green Gourmet line. It has a ceramic-based coating on a hard anodized pan and it is very non-stick. It also is oven safe to 500 degrees. They also make the same coating on a stainless steel pan. I've been happy with the pan but looking at reviews on this site, other people have not been so pleased:

    http://www.bedbathandbeyond.com/product.asp?SKU=113717
     
  11. phatch

    phatch Moderator Staff Member

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    Cast iron reacts with tomatoes and wine as does carbon steel and aluminum. Stainless is best for these ingredients for anything but quick reduction for a pan sauce. Teflon coating is also non-reactive.

    You can get pans very hot on gas or electric burners if you let an empty pan heat and heat as for blackening. Most induction systems have a temperature limiter around 465.  Few oils can take temps above 450 and you don't want to cook beyond the smoke point of the oil anyway.

    Another thing about non-stick is that you don't generate fond for sauces or braising. Many cooks don't care. Nonstick won't give you the surface browning on meat or vegetables  without oil. So yes, you can reduce or eliminate oil with non stick, but you take a flavor hit.

    With good technique, you need very little oil in even stainless steel so unless you have a big reason for avoiding oil, I think you're creating more trouble for yourself than is worth the reward.