No cook rice?

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Joined Jan 22, 2010
So I was browsing the articles on Yahoo this morning and apparently scientists in India have cross bred soft rice with mass produced rice to get rice that doesn't need to be cooked, just soaked in water for 45 minutes. Not even sure how this product would taste, but if it is good, this could be par soaked before hand and make for much quicker rice service, what do you think?

Scientists invent rice that doesn't need cooking
 
3,853
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Joined May 26, 2001
That should thrill the "raw food" folks. Unless, of course, they are against all genetically modified foods as well as all cooked foods.

Now all those scientists have to do is ensure that the water people might use to soak the rice is clean and healthy. That's probably a much bigger task.
 

kuan

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But it takes only 20 minutes to cook rice. :confused::confused:
 

phatch

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But it takes expensive fuel which in much of the world is in short supply or quite dirty pollution wise.

Could also be handy for backpacking or something to stash at the office.

Not saying it will taste that good though.
 
2,753
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Joined Feb 26, 2007
I cook my rice in 9 minutes (rapid boil, nice loose separate grains). If you want an instant rice, just cook, cool, then freeze it in ziplocks and boil in the bag for few minutes. Can't see the point in something that takes 5 times as long :confused:
 
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Joined Jan 22, 2010
One thing I would would want to try with this rice is cooking it. If its already soft, I'm sure you could just flash it boiling water like al dente pasta.
 
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So you boil your water first, then add rice? And what exactly do you mean by loose and separate grains? 9 Minutes is pretty impressive. Also, if you freeze it, that doesn't take away from the flavor?
 
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Or maybe it'll make juk/zhou/congee in like 30 minutes instead of 3 hours... I'd totally be down for trying some if that worked.
 
2,753
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Joined Feb 26, 2007
Yep, boiling water, salt, add rice, stir to keep grains separate, lid back on to bring back to boil, lid off once it reboils, timer on for 9 minutes, stir occasionally to stop sticking to pot. Drain thru colander, rinse with really hot water. Can keep it hot over simmering water in the colander over the pot for a little while, lid on, if something else is not ready yet, just fluff it up with a fork before serving.

The freezing does take away some of the flavour, but it's handy to have in an emergency. Just S&P makes up for it.

Loose and separate grains just means it is not like sticky rice, say like what is used in sushi rolls etc. I much prefer this way rather than sticky rice - but that's just me.
 
2,753
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Joined Feb 26, 2007
Welcome - its the way I was taught by my mother and father, and have never had a problem - is great with curries, stews, mornays, tossing in with cooked veg, or cooling down spread thinly in a tray for fried rice (leaving it to chill for at least 3 hours) or salads etc (unless I've forgotten it and it has cooked too long!). Then I re-name it sticky rice :D and serve it anyway - leaving the charred bits on the bottom lol. Still tasts good like a proper steamed rice, but gotta make sure you don't stir the burnt bits from the bottom of the pan into the body of the rice.

Then give the poor abused pan a good soak in hot water and detergent.

Actually with using this rice for salads, I prefer to dress it with a vinaigrette (sp?) or dressing of choice whilst its still warm. Takes up much more of the flavour. Plus once you are sure of your method, you can try cooking it in chicken stock - really tasty. I enjoy rice a lot. Guess it doesn't show heh
 
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Joined Jun 16, 2007
That was my thought. We boiled tap water 20 minutes before we drank it, when we were there in India. I think that even now most of it is risky to drink without boiling.

Maybe this rice is for western markets. Indians in general are very traditional about their food, and rice is about the last thing, maybe the last thing, they would be willing to change. Edit: perhaps the poorest people would accept it, as their choices are very limited.
 
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For me I cook rice for about 30 minutes... I was wondering what would be the taste of the no cook rice did you mention here...I'm interested on how they prepare it. Thanks for sharing!
 
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But it takes expensive fuel which in much of the world is in short supply or quite dirty pollution wise.

If this rice is at all palatable, this is the point.

Most of the underdeveloped world is denuding their countries of shrubs and trees for cooking fuel. Haiti is one of the worst examples.

If this rice works, it of course won't solve the problem, but the less fuel required to prepare a meal, the less environmental degredation we will experience.

Rotary International has for some years been providing solar ovens to various places in the Third World so that food and bread can be produced without cutting down everything in sight, with the devastation that implies. We're a drop in the bucket, of course, but we're plugging along.

As a perhaps better example, Rotary International has been plugging along for fifteen years or so to eradicate polio worldwide. It's called Polio Plus, and has been the orgainzation's premier effort (not that there aren't a lot of other efforts.) Rotary has raised and spent one-third of a billion dollars to accomplish this and... we're close. The World Health Organization, and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation have come aboard - fairly recently - and there are just a few pockets of polio infestation left. We persevere.

Anyway, my point is that this rice development may not be trivial, given the proportion of the world's population that exists mainly on rice.

Mike
 
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Fresh water is and will remain a long term problem, especially as the population grows. It has been existing for a long time. I am not drumming up business here I will state very soundly. I am involved in providing water solutions for people just in Australia at the moment, and find that people here are getting desparate. I cannot imagine what the situation must be like in other, developing, countries.

Many years ago (probably 20) my then boss and I (in engineering) were having a lengthy discussion about the sustainability of Australia's population in relation to the available water supply as studied over the past century at that time. As early as the 1920s the estimate of a sustainable population in this country was 18 million, given the resources here. That has proven to be pretty much spot on. We are now at 22ish million (small by many standards, but for example) and struggling to supply water at a half way decent amount to all our communities. It isn't working.

This country is building desalinisation sites hand over fist at the moment. I know this is kind of OT, but water, what with us being 75% water, *is a major issue. And it must be drinkable. Cholera epidemics are widespread due to non-potable water. But what can the poorer countries do to fix this? They just don't have the resources.

Hmmm...my soapbox seems to be much used lately, hopping off it for a bit.
 
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Joined Jan 27, 2010
That's scary. I think that's still considered raw food. I'm not at all against raw food (I love Japanese food), but raw rice? thats weird
 

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