Newbie from Philippines

Discussion in 'New User Introductions' started by poklet, Apr 25, 2018.

  1. poklet

    poklet

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    College grad
    Hello everyone!

    I am really glad to find this site. I am an aspirant to become in the future. Unfortunately, I came from a poor family which I find nearly impossible for myself to get enrolled to a culinary school here in the Philippines which is really expensive.

    Do you guys have a piece of advise on how to become a really good chef in the future?
     
  2. harrisonh

    harrisonh

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    Even in the PI you do not need to attend culinary school to become a cook. Use your heritage and build on it. Philp food is one of the up and coming international foods. but you have to become a cook first and even if you do rise to the level of chef, don't all yourself chef.

    In general I would AVOID FOOD TV. That is NOT real life!!!! If you can't afford culinary school I'd be picking up books that are often used as textbooks Professional Cooking (Gisslen), Culinary Arts Principles and Practices (McGreal) Student lab Resources (CIA), Garde Mange (CIA)

    the books from Japanese Culinary Academy, or books that have stood the test of time (such as McGee)
    Avoid the cookbooks of the TV chefs and maybe read the cookbooks of the chefs that other chefs appreciate. even then, don't read them for the recipes. Read them for the mindset.

    Work in a restaurant. Don't be above working "in the pit" (dishwasher). It is NOT a menial job. You'll gain a view there that you cannot get anywhere else! Do whatever they tell you! Don't complain. Don't think you know better, there are things that experience and things that education give you a beginner doesn't know. then once you're good, take stages in better restaurants, keep your mouth shut and your eyes and ears open.
     
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  3. sgmchef

    sgmchef

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    Magandang umaga poklet!

    Welcome to Cheftalk!

    School is a good way to learn the basics but, not the only way. Every Chef here has worked with or for a Chef or cook that graduated from a cooking school and have seen that they just weren't very good.

    Step 1 study food safety! This you can learn this from a book and local regulations. Beautiful food is worthless if someone gets sick! Always keep this in mind...

    Target a Restaurant you think is good and approach the chef and explain your situation and willingness to work your butt off and then prove your words with action! Show up ready to work right that minute! This has worked for me several times. No, neither of them had a job posting! One was at a Marriott hotel with isn't a bad place to perhaps start, a large hotel with multiple food operations like restaurant, bakery, banquet, etc. They might give you a try... Like Harrisonh said, "Eyes open, mouth shut" except to say "I finished that, what's next". Try to work harder than any one else and they will keep you and teach you. Do what you are told. You do have to be at least a little bit quick. You will be expected to accomplish ANY task as fast as possible, without being sloppy or careless.

    Knife skills are absolutely critical and are built with time and repetition. These are skills only you can master, alone. You don't really need an expensive knife set to start, but it is very helpful to know how to sharpen them! Do something like making several batches of french onion soup for family and friends. After peeling, cleaning and dicing or julienne a couple hundred onions, you get much quicker! ALWAYS ask for an example. Focus on the "No piece bigger than rule". Bigger pieces always take longer to cook than smaller ones. Pay attention! Cooking professionally is all about attention to the details! To start, keep the example cuts separate from your cuts so you can make sure you are cutting whatever, to look exactly like what they show you. If you are unsure, ASK! Better than cutting a large volume of some vegetable the wrong size!

    Ultimately, your passion, effort and dedication will determine how much success you have. Getting a job is easier than keeping a job, in cooking. With or without a Diploma from a cooking school.

    Are you in Negros Occidental, by any chance?

    Good luck!
     
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  4. poklet

    poklet

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    notw that I think about your thoughts about mine. I am really glad I joined this site. I think I was doing wrong by trying to learn most of the cooking techniques. well, maybe sooner or later I'll quit my job and work in a restaurant. maybe in middle east? thanks harrisonh I'll take note of that!
     
  5. poklet

    poklet

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    I was moved with your advice, I will start with what you said. Knife skills will always be crucial and important.I tried watching a couple of documentaries about chefs and how they start their humble beginnings. I really do appreciate your advice sir. thanks a lot!

    by the way, Negros Occidental is too far away from where I live. I guess you had a good from that place?
     
  6. sgmchef

    sgmchef

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    The Filipinos from Negros saved my fathers life in WWII. He was there when it was occupied by the Japanese. I would not exist without the help of very courageous Philippine people. I have the Philippine flag he was given in my home. Blue side up, of course.

    I make good Lumpia, but I still don't care for Balut...