New utility knife; petty or bunka?

Discussion in 'Cooking Knife Reviews' started by aliphares, Jan 17, 2018.

  1. aliphares

    aliphares

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    My main knives are an 8 inch henckles that weighs a metric ton and a 270mm laser. I also have a tiny utility knife. I'm in the market for something around 150-170mm to fill the gap. I was going to go for something like a kikuichi carbon petty but I'm debating whether I should go with a 165 bunka in the same price range instead. Does anyone have an opinion around them? Would they be a good replacment? And what do you think the differences in use would be? I like the way they look but not sure which direction to go with. Any other options would also be appreciated.

    Ali
     
  2. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    It depends on the gap you want to fill. The bunka has knuckle clearance, the petty doesn't.
     
  3. aliphares

    aliphares

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    That's the thing. I mainly want it for trimming meats and breaking down whole chickens (obviously not through bone)
    But I also want to use it on the board for things like garlic and small shallots.
     
  4. rick alan

    rick alan

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    I have a knife very similar to this one that I love to use on chicken and meat, only this one has super steel:
    https://warthercutlery.com/product/7-slicing-knife/

    And the founder was quite a character, an Ikonic carver (and I'm not talking turkey).

    You might also consider a honesuki or honkotsu.
     
  5. chrislehrer

    chrislehrer

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    Petty is more useful. Bunkabocho is just an alternative name for santoku-bocho. The point of a santoku is, roughly, to be a petty and a gyuto in one. Assuming you're getting a decent chef's knife/gyuto there's no point in a santoku.

    I regularly break whole chickens with a 165 petty. It's a terrific knife for the purpose. A hankotsu or garasuke is a professional chicken specialist knife: it does that one task wonderfully, but not much else decently. I advise against it.
     
  6. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    I think the honesuki rick alan suggested would be best for you then. Chickens and shallots, that's what I used mine for pretty much.

    The hankotsu, on the other hand, is very dangerous to use. Your hand can very easily slip off the handle and into the blade; almost happened to me once. :confused: Now I put rubber bands all over the handle for extra grip.
     
    Last edited: Jan 17, 2018
  7. aliphares

    aliphares

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    I like that knife, and yea I guess I was only thinking of a 165 bunka to try something different, mostly asked here to see if it was a bad idea :p
    Anyways I was going to go with this but I found out that kikuichi sell their b-stock knives on their site for half the price. Too good to pass up to be honest. Only minor scratches on the rivers and handles. Gonna get myself a new petty and slicer
     
  8. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Yeh I always noticed the handle rides right onto the edge, and it tapering toward the rear looks also like it could just shoot forward out of your hand also. Keeping your 2 smaller fingers snug around the back end is a must with this one.
     
  9. aliphares

    aliphares

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    That's one nice looking slicer :p
    About the sabs, I was curious, how different are the 6 inch petty and the 6 inch slicer?
     
  10. brianshaw

    brianshaw

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    I have 2 of those: one carbon and the other stainless. Nice knives to cut with.
     
  11. Flatheadfoodie

    Flatheadfoodie

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    Ever try the global knife real light but easy to keep sharp.
     
  12. aliphares

    aliphares

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    Some people like the way they look. I'm not one of them. The handle is the most slippery thing I've ever held also. The blade is good and all, but for the price I feel there's better
     
  13. scott livesey

    scott livesey

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    i suggest a double bevel ajikiri which are available up to 150mm. blade shapes vary, some almost rounded like a santoku, some pointed. light weight, cut well, have knuckle clearance.
     
  14. aliphares

    aliphares

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    But would it be good for trimming fat off meat and such? I feel like I need something slimmer
     
  15. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    Some are like you say, others are sharpened the entire length of the blade.

    Totally agreed. It's my most hated line of knives. Some people, surprisingly though, are able to hold them like they have gecko foot for a hand.
     
  16. rick alan

    rick alan

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    Like I said, you got to keep your 2 little fingers snug (but not overly tight) around the handle, they're really your power fingers also.
     
  17. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    I was talking about Global knives with their super slippery handle design.