New Light on Neaderthal Diet

1,245
267
Joined Sep 21, 2001
Every generation thinks THEY are the first......
We seem to forget that even way back when in those early times we were Humans and some of those Humans were really really smart.
On a related note...Last Spring we were down in Moab, Utah. One of our activities was looking for petroglyphs. We just happened to be at a large site exactly at the equinox when I noticed that sunlight had EXACTLY bisected a spiral on one of the rock faces at that time, and disappeared only a few minutes after the equinox. Coincidence?
 
1,389
13
Joined Jul 24, 2001
Exactly! I remember when I was studying archaeology, my "motto" was " Oh God! Did they know that TOO" ???

Great article Alexia, thanks :)
 
489
10
Joined Mar 3, 2002
Peachcreek, that must have been a wonderful sight.

There are ancient remains the whole world over that have light striking images at key times of the year. The most famous is probably Stonehenge which is thought by some to be a giant "calendar," something like a sundial for the year rather than the day.
 
1,389
13
Joined Jul 24, 2001
Alexia

The most breathtaking sight I have seen is the cave of Tautavel in France.

I wish to everybody to be able to visit once this monument that dates thousands of centuries back!
 
489
10
Joined Mar 3, 2002
Yes, there's something incredible about such places. Is Tautavel still open to the public? They're closing and restricting a lot of these caves to keep humidity changes from degrading the paintings.

I lucked out a few years ago, soon after they reopened Altimira. I didn't have a (two-year-in-advance) reservation, but my son was doing a summer program with one of the people there who arranged to let me in, too. I'm claustrophobic. but I will not turn up the chance to see these traces of our so distant past. His professor expressed a private opinion that the cave may have been in use far longer than the official version and I believe he has written about the similarity of some of the artifact there to some early American Indian remains. (It's naive of us to think that early people we not able to sail boats along with everything else they did.)

Personally, I'm never suprised when some of these these early peoples turn out to be older than once thought. After all, we are only finding a fraction of what once existed. The ones we find may not be the earliest instances of what once was. I am surprised, though that the other article I posted from the NYTimes didn't elicit more interest. The notion that it was cooking food and the physical consequences that flowed from it might have been a significant turning point in the physical as well as cultural development of modern humans is major.
 

pete

Moderator
Staff member
4,509
998
Joined Oct 7, 2001
I have always wondered where humankind would be if so much of our knowledge had not be lost and had to be rediscovered all over again and again.
 
Top Bottom