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Discussion in 'Food & Cooking' started by henson99, Jul 4, 2014.

  1. henson99

    henson99

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    just registered and i know forums have various rules and etiquette

    is there any particular section where an up and coming cook could ask questions/advice? or can i just post here? 
     
  2. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    @Henson99  you're good right here in the Food & Cooking forum, everyone will be able to help you, Home Experts as well as Professional Food Service folks  /img/vbsmilies/smilies/smile.gif
     
  3. teamfat

    teamfat

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    @Henson99 this is the wrong place to be. We are a bunch of cranky, mean spirited old curmudgeons that ... okay, I just can't say that.  This is an amazing group of folks, I think you'd really have to work at coming up with questions that can't be answered here, there is an amazing breadth and depth of culinary talent and experience available.  And usually served up with a smile.

    Welcome to Cheftalk.

    mjb.
     
  4. 50stores

    50stores

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    Hello Chef Talk. New here. I'm on my 50th restaurant opening and have been a GM most of my life. Love to offer advice to anyone who needs multiple points of view. Great site Chef Talk!!
     
  5. henson99

    henson99

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    Ok guys thanks a lot!

    I will probably be asking a lot!! I am planning on looking for an entry level cook position sometime this summer.

    I have been studying a lot of Heston/Ramsay/Marco vids, as well as several others, and I am trying to not only learn how to cook well, but learn why we do things a certain way. I'm not satisfied with just knowing how to cook something right, i really want to know whats the difference between this and that, or why do you do this and not that etc...

    So...one of my first questions I was thinking of, is what is the difference between gas grilling and pan frying in a restaurant?

     why do most places seem to use grills? Is there any benefit as far as flavor,tenderness when you cook on a hot grill vs. in a pan with oils/butter etc...?

    i have a friend that has been cooking for a long time now and i asked him what the difference is and he said "well one is on a hot dry grill and the other is in a pan with oil?

    well, duhh....so  i asked why would someone prefer one over the other and he had nothing to say.

    he can cook his ass off but i dont want to be that guy. i dont want to be able to just do something right, but dont know why im doing it.
     
  6. henson99

    henson99

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    wow 50???? thts impressive as hell


     
     
  7. henson99

    henson99

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    well i guess no one knows.
     
  8. grande

    grande

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  9. genemachine

    genemachine

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    Patience, master Henson. While there are lots of members, Cheftalk is not one of those always-on forums. If you ask something, it may take a day or so.

    As to your question:

    Grill - no limit to the direct temperature due to the smoke point of your oil, less versatility than pan frying.

    Pan - somewhat lower temperature dependent on the oil, possibility to add other ingredients, to deglaze to make a sauce etc - more options.

    It's a question of what temperatures you want, how you want to control them during the cooking process and whether you want to do anything else with your meat.
     
  10. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    Grills are more space efficient. If I have a 4 ft grill I can get 24 chicken breasts going at one time. In order to get 24 chicken breasts going at one time in saute pans is going to take more than 4 ft of stove top. Also the learning curve is more friendly on grill than saute. Most people can pick up a modicum of success on grill station fairly quickly. It is more straight forward. Saute station has a lot more intricacies to it.
    Very admirable and wise attitude to have. Good at you. People that don't know why (other than because that is the way we have always done it) are stunting their growth process. Also don't be afraid to find the answers yourself. Grill a piece of salmon and taste it. Evaluate it from flavor, texture, every single sensory aspect that springs to mind. Saute a piece of salmon and do the same.
     
  11. kaneohegirlinaz

    kaneohegirlinaz

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    @Henson99  when posting questions, those would be started in this forum, for those of us not employeed in the Professional Food Service Industries.

    The Feedback & Suggestion forum is specificly for question in regards to the website itself, once you'fe reviewed the FAQ and Community Guidelines.

    You may want to start a new thread and title it in a manner that will attract membership.

    This is a great article, written by Chef Talk's founder.

    You might find this Support article helpful as well.

    When we really need help with the site, you can PM or private message one of us mods.

    I'd say we're a pretty friendly bunch.
     
  12. henson99

    henson99

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    thanks a lot guys


    and sorry, you're right  @genemachine should have been a little more patient! 

    @cheflayne  thanks, makes perfect sense. i may try grilling some salmon later. i know i can tell a pretty noticeable difference between pan frying and just using the pan to sear and finishing in the oven. interesting you say the grill is a little easier for beginners, seems i have always had a hell of time trying to grill something right, but not too much trouble using the stove/pan. i SUCK so bad at grilling anything.

    i think right now my biggest issue is getting the finger test method down when checking for done-ness...if thats a word lol. i have a thermometer and that helps, but i am trying not to get too dependent on it.


    again, thanks to everyone and sorry for the lack of patience :) 

    i've only posted on a few forums and I guess im a bit spoiled because the ones i use are extremely active and you get replies pretty much immediately. doesn't mean the replies you get really answer your question though...
     
  13. teamfat

    teamfat

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    There may be some confusion here as to "grill" itself. One type is what you see in restaurants, a large, flat steel surface ( aka flattop ) for frying eggs, pancakes, burgers, etc.  The other grill is what you see in backyards cooking hot dogs and rendering boneless, skinless chicken into inedible lumps

    mjb.

    PS: You know there were times when cleaning the flat top after service was very relaxing, a simple, calming zen exercise.
     
  14. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    In restaurant speak, to me this is a grill


    and this is a flattop.


    The top one is sold by name as a charbroiler and the bottom one by name as a griddle, but in restaurant speak, if chef tells me to grill something, odds are that I would use the top one.
     
  15. cheflayne

    cheflayne

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    When I say the grill is easier to learn, I am not talking strictly about a sole technique, but the station as a whole.
     
  16. grande

    grande

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    Its true becausse its easier to multitask. On the grill you can leave everything alone for a minute & set plates or whatever. Saute tends to require a little more attention, especially if your doing it right. Saute type dishes tend to have more steps, while actual grilling is pretty straightforward. Of course, it also depebds on how much of each plate pick up your stuck with.