New Guy Bright Ideas (Roux)

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Clam Chowder - Thinks Thickening his chowder with Heavy Cream with Flour vs What I use is Bacon Grease, Butter and Flour any thoughts?
 
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Basically a “whitewash” albeit with cream instead of water. It does work, no chance of splitting either. Very fast way of doing things.

If you don’t have a house recipie then anything goes. If you do have one, then you gotta stick to the recipie.
 
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A lot of soups will be thickened or finished with cream, but I would think it would take a lot of cream and reduction to thicken a chowder to the right consistency with only using reduced cream.
 
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Sure, why not. Should taste great. Besides... the thickness and thickening agent for chowder is as regional as are chowder recipes.
 
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Cooking the potatoes in the cream will cause the potatoes to release starch and help to tighten up the chowder.
True, i was just going on the assumption that the soup was basically done by the time they came to thickening it meaning the potatoes were already cooked. I was more referencing that fact that the consistency of clam chowder I am picturing in my mind would take a lot of reduction if just using cream as the thickener as opposed to a roux. At the end of the day I guess it really doesn't matter what you use to thicken it as long as it's delicious.
 
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Yeah you should see the arguments we get into about clam and Manhattan up here.
I grew up in Boston and DownEastMaine. The differences between these two are profound. And then there is Rhode Island chowder. I couldn’t even acknowledge Manhattan Chowder as a valid chowder. My profound apology but it’s a deeply rooted bias based on generations of New Englanders that I have but not too proud of.
 
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True, i was just going on the assumption that the soup was basically done by the time they came to thickening it meaning the potatoes were already cooked. I was more referencing that fact that the consistency of clam chowder I am picturing in my mind would take a lot of reduction if just using cream as the thickener as opposed to a roux. At the end of the day I guess it really doesn't matter what you use to thicken it as long as it's delicious.
To keep the potato from over cooking, some can be pulled out, blitzed, and put back on to thicken.
 
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I grew up in Boston and DownEastMaine. The differences between these two are profound. And then there is Rhode Island chowder. I couldn’t even acknowledge Manhattan Chowder as a valid chowder. My profound apology but it’s a deeply rooted bias based on generations of New Englanders that I have but not too proud of.

I’m sorry, but whenever I hear “chowder”, I flash back to the Simpsons episode where the French waiter pronounces it “ shaowdair”.....
 
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I grew up in Boston and DownEastMaine. The differences between these two are profound. And then there is Rhode Island chowder. I couldn’t even acknowledge Manhattan Chowder as a valid chowder. My profound apology but it’s a deeply rooted bias based on generations of New Englanders that I have but not too proud of.
I've never heard of Rhode Island chowder, what's it like? Also another thing to add is with the different regional chowder debates we also had the added layer of consistency with the spoon stand test debate.
 
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Bacon/bacon fat, and salt pork, are typical add-ins for chowda, nothing out of the ordinary there. Much of the time I can just go for nothing much more than a puree of potato with cream and fresh parsley as base.
 
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RI chowder is onions, fresh clams, broth, potatoes finished with a hint of tomato for color. Many use tomato soup for the tomato part but not enough to overwhelm the clam flavor, just enough to give it a reddish tint.
I'll see if I can dig up my grandmother's recipe.
 
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RI chowder is onions, fresh clams, broth, potatoes finished with a hint of tomato for color. Many use tomato soup for the tomato part but not enough to overwhelm the clam flavor, just enough to give it a reddish tint.
I'll see if I can dig up my grandmother's recipe.
Would you please!
 
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I would bet most people never had Manhattan or RI Clam chowder. I grew up on Manhattan clam chowder. what I liked about it was the true unmasked flavor you get from the clam nectar. I didn't have the Cream based chowder until I left the East Coast. I think the reason people like that kind of chowder is because it doesn't have a clam taste. I think the Manhattan and RI chowder is more of a purist way of eating a clam flavored chowder. In other words it doesn't really disguise the flavor of the clam nectar with a rich heavy cream.
 
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Your “disguise” is our “enhance”. :)
The old trick was to make Potato soup on Thursday and put a can of clams into the leftovers on Friday. I did this and had more people coming back telling me how much they loved the Clam Chowder. That told me they really don't like clams or clam flavor.
 
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If I want unadulterated clam nectar, personally I'll shuck some littlenecks, or quags even, and down them with a little lemon. That aside I very much like clam-flavored cream bases, aka, clam chowda. And of course cream, as in dairy, and the accompanying fat, does not actually have to be part of a cream base.

The problem with RI and NY chowdas [I've had] is they were watery tasting. Yeh fat can mask some I guess, but is also known for carrying flavor, but water mostly just waters things down. If one spent much more money than most any restaurant would be willing to shell out on RI/NY "clam soup" and made a properly concentrated clam stock, well that is something I probably could call Chowda.

Actually I might be able to go for a clam flavored French-like onion soup, I'll have to try that sometime. Maybe RI and NY should give it a go too.
 

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