Nervous about being promoted to Kitchen Supervisor

3
1
Joined Sep 12, 2018
Im not sure if this website fits the category of my job description, if it doesnt i do apologize.

First off, im 26 years old and I am currently a prep cook for a nursing home, ive been employed with them for 3 years now. My job requires me going down to speak with several different residents about what we're having on the menu for the day and giving them alternative food choices if they do not like what we're going to be having. When a new admission comes in i immediately hit the floor and go down to talk to then to get their diet histories ( Drinks they would like for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Getting their dislikes for food. Asking if they have any chewing or swallowing issues). I update boards that are posted in our kitchen so that the kitchen staff no exactly how many residents we have and the number of people that are on different diets, that way the cooks and dietary aides no exactly how much foos to make accordingly. I also assist the cooks if they need any help preparing meals.

The dietary manager, who has worked there for 18 years will be leaving soon and has recommended that i become the kitchen supervisor. She has also enrolled me into CDM classes so i can get my certification ( Something ive always wanted). Im mainly nervous because I dont know how my other coworkers are going to take my promotion or if theyll be able to look at me as a person with authority now. My boss is teaching me everything she knows, such as doing the food order, invoices, scheduling, orientation, and getting wound reports ready for the Dietitian . Ive only done the food order 3 times and ive made minor mistakes on all 3 orders. I know noone is perfect and ive got big shows to fill but i dont want my boss to think im not capable of the supervisor job and start having second thoughts about it before she leaves.

Another thing that bothers me is that there are cooks that have been there for 13, 14 years and i feel as if im stepping on their toes by pretty much bumping past them and outranking them in a way.

Thanks in advance for any tips or words of wisdom to calm my nerves
 
2,529
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Joined Feb 8, 2009
Hi Kim, It's never easy moving into your first management position. Just remember you were picked for a reason. The reason is that you already show a good understanding of the operation. The one thing I took out of your post was the understanding of patients needs. Thats the most important thing in this job. Always be sincere in the wants and needs of your clients. The more sincere you are the better chance your staff will follow. Upper management needs to have people who go the extra yard in showing their clients they care.

The ordering, scheduling and daily management responsibilities will come in time. Just realize there are items on your order sheet that need to be in house all the time. Build those to a par stock so you can always have them available. Forgetting some items on the order sheet in the beginning is normal.You will get better and better at it as time goes by. Always spend more time on the things your not sure of. Talk with your food salesman and explain to them that this is a weak point for you right now. If you do forget to order something, it's possible for the salesman to drop the item off the next morning. Don't be afraid to ask him or her for help in the beginning.

The best way to manage your employees will be to work on the floor during service time. It's good for them to see you caring about their job and also helping them accomplish a quicker serving time for service. When you meet with all your employees explain to them what your plans are for the department. Tell them in order to accomplish the departments needs you'll need them. A good manager realizes that managing people is a two way street. Take care of them, and tell them you will always be in their corner at their time of need. Also always thank all your employees for a good days work. Your employees want to work for someone who understands what their job entitles. Be there when they need you and they will be there when you need them. Employees also need to have all the tools available to accomplish their goals. If something breaks down get it fixed. Employees only want results, not excuses. ............Good luck with your new position. Your going to do great!.........ChefBillyB
 
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Joined Oct 31, 2012
Several thoughts. Carry a small notebook. Use it to write down things you may need to know like directions on doing the food order, daily problems, things to do tomorrow, etc. You may not need it every day but it is very handy to have.
Your job as kitchen manager is essentially making sure the staff have the tools, training and materials they need to do their job. You will, of course, have your own jobs to do. While making sure you do your own job, don't be afraid to jump in where ever necessary. So sweeping the floor, filling pudding cups, wiping up messes, putting away stock, etc isn't beneath you.
The biggest challenge I've found is standing up to an employee who decides to test you by openly violating a known rule/regulation. For example, In my workplace, employees have to pay for bottled beverages but not fountain drinks. They are supposed to keep the receipt handy to prove they paid for it. When this was first announced, I saw a couple of employees take beverages in front of me but begin to head away from the register. I simply walked over and said quietly, "You will have a receipt for that, right?". They immediately went and paid for it. No one was embarrassed and everyone now knows I am enforcing the rule.
I once had a new employee who got an attitude and questioned my authority every time I said anything. I got the manager and director together and we had a quick meeting with the employee. The director very diplomatically explained the situation and that I was doing the job I was hired to do, upholding the standards of the organization. The employee responded that i was a bit sharp in my delivery of oversight. Fair enough. We've gotten along fine ever since.
So all of this to say, simply do the job in an unemotional, factual way. Stand your ground. Most employees should already know what is expected of them and should respond accordingly. Those few who don't will single themselves out quickly.
Don't expect it to be easy or to get a handle on it right away. Just treat it like any other job and keep improving as you go along. You'll be fine.
 
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Joined Mar 1, 2017
The first golden rule in management is you cannot make good decisions if you are worried about what your subordinates think or feel.

The second golden is there will always be those who won't like your decision no matter what that decision is. You cannot please everyone nor should you make decisions based on pleasing your staff. In the end, they will just end up disrespecting you.

Remember, you are not there to be their friend. Be professional. Be pleasant. Be fair. But, remember, when you are friends with your staff, it makes hard decisions damn near impossible and can easily give your staff the impression that you are playing favorites. That's never good.

Employees respect fairness, decisiveness, direct action, confidence and knowing what is expected of them. As a leader, the words "I don't know" can never pass from your lips because your employees are deciding whether or not to respect you in your new position by comparing what they know against what you know. If they think they know more than you or can do your job better than you, that's where the problems start. That's why you never discuss business decisions or issues with other employees with your staff. Period.

If an employee asks you a question about their job that you do not know the answer to, turn it into a learning opportunity for your employee. Have them research the issue and come back to you with possible solutions. Telling them "I don't know" or "don't worry about it" is always the wrong answer. On the other hand, If the question is out of their lane, "don't worry about it" can be a perfectly good answer.

Know your job inside and out and know the jobs of everyone under you just as well. Make it a point to learn the job of the person above you, too. You are going to make mistakes. That's how you learn. When you make mistakes, own them and fix them. Don't be that supervisor that blames others.

Be confident in the fact that you were chosen for promotion. That means someone recognized your potential and aptitude. Build on that.

Good luck. :)
 
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Joined Nov 10, 2017
Kim:

There is a lot of great advice here. I currently work at a hospital that also owns a senior life center/assisted living community down the road that we cater to as well. When I first got here there were a lot of organizational issues and inefficiencies because most of the employees only knew how to operate in a healthcare setting that wasn't necessarily focused on efficiency in the way that restaurants are. One of the first things I set about correcting was the fact that nothing was ever put back from where it was taken. If this is the case by you, my first recommendation would be to make sure everything has a home and then that it returns to that home. We have over 2000 items in our inventory, but with things being organized I can tell at a glance exactly what I need. Most nursing homes and hospitals that I have seen have a set rotation menu. We are on a 28 day cycle. If this is indeed the case, you ought to be able to make an ordering template on the website of whatever broadline distributor you are using. That way you make sure you have the essential bases covered.

You said there is a dietician there, I am curious as to why they are not doing the intake interviews to determine diets and restrictions. You should also have a speech therapist that determines dysphagia diets. I am interested to know where you are located and whether or not CMS visits you or what regulatory board governs your facility.

I have had a long hard 5 years here, there has been a lot of change and a lot of butting heads, but things are going very well now and it was all worth it. I would be more than happy to share any of my personal experiences, challenges, advice and insight if you want to pm me to discuss anything further.

Im not sure if this website fits the category of my job description, if it doesnt i do apologize.

First off, im 26 years old and I am currently a prep cook for a nursing home, ive been employed with them for 3 years now. My job requires me going down to speak with several different residents about what we're having on the menu for the day and giving them alternative food choices if they do not like what we're going to be having. When a new admission comes in i immediately hit the floor and go down to talk to then to get their diet histories ( Drinks they would like for breakfast, lunch, and dinner. Getting their dislikes for food. Asking if they have any chewing or swallowing issues). I update boards that are posted in our kitchen so that the kitchen staff no exactly how many residents we have and the number of people that are on different diets, that way the cooks and dietary aides no exactly how much foos to make accordingly. I also assist the cooks if they need any help preparing meals.

The dietary manager, who has worked there for 18 years will be leaving soon and has recommended that i become the kitchen supervisor. She has also enrolled me into CDM classes so i can get my certification ( Something ive always wanted). Im mainly nervous because I dont know how my other coworkers are going to take my promotion or if theyll be able to look at me as a person with authority now. My boss is teaching me everything she knows, such as doing the food order, invoices, scheduling, orientation, and getting wound reports ready for the Dietitian . Ive only done the food order 3 times and ive made minor mistakes on all 3 orders. I know noone is perfect and ive got big shows to fill but i dont want my boss to think im not capable of the supervisor job and start having second thoughts about it before she leaves.

Another thing that bothers me is that there are cooks that have been there for 13, 14 years and i feel as if im stepping on their toes by pretty much bumping past them and outranking them in a way.

Thanks in advance for any tips or words of wisdom to calm my nerves
 
3
1
Joined Sep 12, 2018
Kim:

There is a lot of great advice here. I currently work at a hospital that also owns a senior life center/assisted living community down the road that we cater to as well. When I first got here there were a lot of organizational issues and inefficiencies because most of the employees only knew how to operate in a healthcare setting that wasn't necessarily focused on efficiency in the way that restaurants are. One of the first things I set about correcting was the fact that nothing was ever put back from where it was taken. If this is the case by you, my first recommendation would be to make sure everything has a home and then that it returns to that home. We have over 2000 items in our inventory, but with things being organized I can tell at a glance exactly what I need. Most nursing homes and hospitals that I have seen have a set rotation menu. We are on a 28 day cycle. If this is indeed the case, you ought to be able to make an ordering template on the website of whatever broadline distributor you are using. That way you make sure you have the essential bases covered.

You said there is a dietician there, I am curious as to why they are not doing the intake interviews to determine diets and restrictions. You should also have a speech therapist that determines dysphagia diets. I am interested to know where you are located and whether or not CMS visits you or what regulatory board governs your facility.

I have had a long hard 5 years here, there has been a lot of change and a lot of butting heads, but things are going very well now and it was all worth it. I would be more than happy to share any of my personal experiences, challenges, advice and insight if you want to pm me to discuss anything further.
 
3
1
Joined Sep 12, 2018
Our Dietician only comes in on Thursdays, she is who i go to if someone wants to have large portions or receive a supplement shake (Like Boost) for their meals.

The speech therapist detetmines if a resident needs to upgraded or downgraded in the texture of their food or if their liquids need to be thin, nectar, or honey.

And im located in Virginia
 
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