Negotiation for compensation

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by JAMESBOND, Sep 18, 2018.

  1. JAMESBOND

    JAMESBOND

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    Hi guys,
    I am new at this forum and I am happy to share my concern with you and also get some advice as well.
    I just got my first executive Chef position and I am concern about my compensation.I think I didnt make really good deal with boss. Now I am finding out that executive Chefs are usually making some kind of contract with included bonuses based on sales or labor cost.
    Btw to give further explanation of my situation.Owner decide to renovate brand new restaurant adopting to new concept as previous concept faild after 2 months, horrible management , horrible chef, high food cost , weird kitchen flow... one word mess..I came to built kitchen from scratch in less than 2 months...work with electrician , architect , purchasing new equipment , create breakfast , lunch,dinner,brunch, bar and delivery menu...inventory lists, ordering guide , production lists , plating guide , cook book ,allergy list , goal to reach min 4.000.000$ revenue and to have FC on 23-24%max and work 6days on the line as expediter. I will be able to hire only one sous chef .
    I am very excited to step in Executive position but I think that I have so may things on my plate for salary that was offered for me.
    Restaurant will be reopen in 3weeks.Its based in NYC manhattan or really good location.
    I am looking forward for any advice regarding my case , what is the minimum that I should ask for (bonuses or % wise ).
     
  2. foodpump

    foodpump

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    First question: aprox how many staff will you be responsible for?

    Many chefs do have bonuses based on f.c. and l.c.. I personally would not negotiate a bonus on labour cost, but am o.k. with a food cost bonus.

    The other thing is, you can only negotiate a salary BEFORE you start. You have no bargaining power after you’re hired
     
  3. someday

    someday

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    Yeah, I agree, you are kind of screwed since you've already accepted the job and have been working. It's possible that the owner will be amenable to more compensation at this point but I highly doubt it. The best time to negotiate salary is before you start.

    My advice would be to stick it out, get the numbers under control, and use that as a bargaining chip for a raise in the future. Or, at least, parlay that into a higher paying job somewhere else after a couple years of running this operation.
     
  4. JAMESBOND

    JAMESBOND

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    I will be responsible for approx for 11-14 employees.
    I don't agree that I have no bargaining power after I was hired.
    Keep in mind that restaurant it's opening soon and I didn't hire my stuff yet which means that I am the only one who keeps ideas, menu and all the lists of all BOH operation. So from the owner perspective, You don't wanna lose Chef just before opening cuz empty restaurant makes you lose 5K per day...postponing opening can have a huge impact on your budget.
    But also another fact is that when I agreed on the salary we made clear that's not the final price and owner said:''till the point B'', so I wanna use my point B to be just before opening, and I wanna make sure that I am clear with my demands.
    So I need advice about
    what should be the minimum (% wise ) bellow which I can't go?
     
  5. Chef_Aaron_B

    Chef_Aaron_B

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    Keep in Mind you have no had evidence to determine what your sales are and what the owner could afford to pay you yet.

    But a Four million dollar operation in Manhattan, I'd think you should be around the $70,000 Mark, starting out.
     
  6. foodpump

    foodpump

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    Hi Jamesbond,

    Well,yes, you do have an bargaining advantage by pulling out before the place opens. However, if you choose to exercise that option you won’t be very popular in town, right? The best bargaining power comes from not giving a **ck about using a threat or not. Thus, during an interview you can hold firm to your price and still walk away with both parties not p*ssed off. Many times, this results in the employer calling you after a few months willing to “discuss option”, but it will never happen if you walk out in the middle of your employment.

    So you negotiated an increase after “ point b”. But what is point b? Daily sales of X$? A three month minimum of X food cost? Three favourable restaurant reviews?

    Me, If I were in this position, Id ask for a 10 % increase, plus some kind of bennies, I’d be prepared to get one, and if both, fantastic, but would be happy with one.

    Mind you , if I were the employer, Id be wanting to see job descriptions for all positions, purchasing and receiving procedures, sanitizing procedures, recipes, costing for recipes, and general paperwork before granting a pay increase.