Need your experience and knowledge

Discussion in 'Professional Chefs' started by Thyme2cook, Jun 19, 2018.

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  1. Thyme2cook

    Thyme2cook

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    Thanks for taking the time chefs. I am 19 year old working at a bar and grill. I'm still learning as I just graduated school. I have been going the task to change or chicken wings.

    We currently sell 12 wings for 12 dollars. They are frozen, breaded, and brought in by a vendor. Take about 8 minutes to cook from frozen. We offer regular or buffalo.

    The owner says this is good because we don't have white since they are frozen. So he does not want fresh. They cost about. 60 cents a piece so not much money made when u factor everything. My plan is to go to fresh wings without breading. Offer a few more sauces and then finish on flattop since we have no grill and would be nice to chat some sauces like the Asian flavored. So my question to you are what are your methods or ideas to improve these wings. I only have one prep guy so can be extremely time consuming and only have one reach in over under the stove. Also I would like to keep the total time from order in to window around the 10 minute range since we push stuff out. Some people say fry from fresh. Others say bake buy I don't have ton of oven space. Your thoughts chefs. Thabks soooo much
     
  2. Thyme2cook

    Thyme2cook

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    Sorry let me correct. The owner thinks this is good since we don't have waste was meant in second paragraph
     
  3. Pat Pat

    Pat Pat

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    I prefer wings that are breaded. We always bread them in-house though, never heard of pre-made frozen wings before.
     
  4. Chef_Aaron_B

    Chef_Aaron_B

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    Blanch the wings in a low fryer first, then when order comes in you only have to drop them in a hot fryer for a few mins. This will drop you ticket times.
     
    Steve Cheeseman likes this.
  5. someday

    someday

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    :sick:

    I actually have never done wings in a professional capacity before (except for staff meals, etc where we'd fry to order), but I know a lot of high volume places par cook the wings in the oven, chill, then drop in the fryer to order. Like Aaron said, I'm sure you could blanch the wings in the fryer as well. I like the oven idea because you don't have a basket being taken up with part cooked wings just waiting for an order, they are in the cooler.

    I think the trick is to not overcook them, because even though they are usually covered in sauce, if the meat is dry and stringy then they are not fun to eat.

    I don't get the finishing on the flat top...could you explain your idea more?
     
  6. sgsvirgil

    sgsvirgil

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    Much of what you are asking depends on how many wings your restaurant pushes out over a given period of time. If your oven space is limited and you push a lot of wings, baked is probably not going to be the answer here.

    If you are asking for ideas for sauces or flavor ideas for the wings, you could literally do anything. Here are some ideas.

    - Salt and pepper wings (fresh or frozen) - while the wings are fresh from the fryer, toss them in a bowl of salt and pepper mixed at a ratio of about 50/50. I sold these wings faster than I could make them during lunch rush.

    - Asian style sauce - (fresh or frozen) - 2 parts soy sauce, 1 part fish sauce, splash or two of rice wine vinegar (any vinegar will do, actually), green onion, orange zest, 1/2 sugar and 2 tsp flour or corn starch. Thicken over medium heat. If you use flour (which i think is better but, corn starch is cheaper), make a rue by heating some oil and cooking the flour first and then adding cold soy sauce/fish sauce mixture. It will thicken a it comes back up to temp. You can make gallons of this stuff ahead of time and it will keep for quite awhile. Fry the wings and then finish with the sauce in a hot pan or serve plain with the sauce on the side for dipping.

    - Orange Glaze - (Fresh or frozen) - Orange juice, soy sauce, ginger, garlic and brown sugar (or molasses). Cook the wings in the fryer and pan finish with the glaze.

    - Pineapple Glaze - (fresh or frozen) - Same recipe as orange glaze except with pineapple juice instead of orange juice.

    I hope this helps.

    Good luck. :)
     
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  7. Thyme2cook

    Thyme2cook

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    thanks for the replies. I thought after frying I could toss in a sauce and throw on flattop to caramelize a little bit, on an unbreaded wing. Might be a pain during service I guess. I would look at the sales to see how much I should prep and keep on hand so im not wasting much. How long would it take to fry fresh wings? Are they any good like this? I know the baked wings are juicy, would just straight frying them be dry?
     
  8. Thyme2cook

    Thyme2cook

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    Also any lighter or fresher app ideas. He currently has jalepno poppers, chips with dip, fried pickles, pretzel with cheese, tenders, bacon wrapped hotdog bites on skewer, irish nachos, ruben eggrolls, buffalo fried shrimp and wings. all this is fried or heavy. any cool bar app suggestions that would look nice, profitable and taste good. thanks for help, you are all life savers
     
  9. chefwriter

    chefwriter

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    Classic wings (made famous by the Anchor bar in western New York)are fresh wings, deep fried, then tossed in a 50/50 combination of butter and Franks' Red Hot sauce. The Anchor Bars' actual recipe is reputed to be a closely guarded secret but most people use the butter/Franks combination. Typically served 12 per order with blue cheese dressing and carrot and celery sticks.
    I can't say how the Anchor Bar prepares them but baked or deep fry blanched is most often done by many to speed up the process during service.
    As has been pointed out but bears repeating, the wings should be no more than just cooked the first time to prevent drying out in the fryer. A good wing has crispy skin and moist meat and should arrive coated with sauce, not sitting in a pool of it. The serving of blue cheese should be generous and there should be about four or five each of the carrots and celery per order.
    Naturally you can do what you want from there but that's pretty much the original. Due to their popularity fresh wings may be expensive so frozen may offer an economical alternative.
    I'm a purist with wings so I don't care for breading. I do like other seasonings like salt and vinegar wings but nothing breaded.
    As for other quick apps, depending on location you could do seasonal items. Salad of the day(not just lettuce-rice, grain or potato salads, Fresh potato chips with various seasonings, sweet potato chips, old fashioned retro pickled eggs, house pickled sausages,flavored popcorn, a modern take on the classic shrimp cocktail.
    I spent some years hanging in an old time bar and the eggs and sausages were quite popular way back. Perhaps look up some old time bar food and modernize some of it.
     
  10. iridium12

    iridium12

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    And keeping with that, you can change the flavor as the year progresses - keeps the menu interesting.

    In regards to some "cool" bar apps - has been a while since I've worked in the bar & grill scene - but I do remember we used to have some summer apps in the place I worked:

    Corn cups (very thin corn batter fried to a cup shape)
    These we filled with egg salad, cucumber salad, salad nicoise, etc.....basically we changed the filling on a monthly basis and had the option of 1 cup / 3 cups / 5 cups for orders
    Customer could also mix & match
    Salads were all prepped in the morning and then chilled, easy

    Just my two cents
     
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  11. Thyme2cook

    Thyme2cook

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    ok good input. I will be getting pricing this week but I cant imagine raw, fresh wings being 60 cent a piece like the frozen breaded I currently get. So I am guessing I should blanch them first. Do I fry them complety until cooked. Then cool down and crisp and heat to order? I feel with my small oven I can only that can fit 2 half sheet trays id only be able to bake off 4 or 6 orders and then fry them to order so it may not be realistic if unless I do 2 or 3 batches a day.
    It would probably defeat the whole purpose of blanching in the fryer, cooling down, freezing and then reheat and crisp from freezer to order im assuming? but that way there isn't waste. I have to purpose the idea this week so im trying to get all the kinks worked out because I know he will shoot it down if it takes to long to cook, etc. ah well thanks anyways chefs. good job
     
  12. capricciosa

    capricciosa

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    The savings of using fresh (even with waste) outweigh the cost of frozen, processed wings. Prepped raw chicken gets 2 days in our kitchen at cooler temp, so waste really shouldn't be an issue If he's so worried about waste, try this: season, portion & freeze the raw wings. Slack a portion of your estimated sales before service. At some point during service, calculate the remaining on-hand and slack more. Do this every few hours. Frozen wings slacked under cold running water don't take that long to thaw. It requires a little trial and error to get a production planning formula just right, but it's very doable. Still, given their shelf life, I think this is more work than necessary, but it might be a suitable compromise between you and the owner. Fry for 8 minutes as the tickets come in and apply sauce.

    As for marketing, get wild with the sauces - they're cheap and easy to rotate and experiment with and not waste money. And lots can be made to order.
     
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  13. Thyme2cook

    Thyme2cook

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    Capricciosa made an excellent point. I am thinking exactlty this, have some protion and frozenand pull as I need. so you can cook those wings in about 8 minutes? should I just season and fry? or toss in a little flour or corn starch not to bread but help crisp? thanks so much for this idea
     
  14. capricciosa

    capricciosa

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    8 minutes at 375 from non-frozen. I don't know the time from frozen, but most health codes don't allow cooking frozen, raw poultry. You'd have to get a system going of having some unthawed at the start of the shift and thaw them in batches as you work through them.

    We do naked or lightly dusted in seasoned flour - whichever the customer requests. L prefer corn starch, but our owner wants flour, and both work similarly. After cooking, sauce and serve.
     
  15. Thyme2cook

    Thyme2cook

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    Yes I will cook fresh. Freeze and thaw as needed. Thank u so much for your help. Seems to be the most efficient way in my situation with no oven and one man in the kitchen. Thanks.
     
  16. Iceman

    Iceman

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    I work in a number of bars. We sell maybe 40lbs of wings a nite. 2-20lb bags to a box. 1-bag to a bucket. I like to rinse the wings out of the bag ... because I just do. They get squished into the 5-gal bucket and are covered w/ buttermilk ... then they go in the walk-in for tomorrow. I use a mix of flour/cornmeal w/ all your general chx-wing seasonings. I bread them ... let them sit ... then rebread. They get tossed in the deep-fry for 10-min then rest until room-temp then bagged and into the freezer. When an order comes up it's 8-min in the deep-fry ... sauce ... serve. ... NONE ever come back.


    "We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery.".
     
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  17. John Appelhanz

    John Appelhanz

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    Ice mans on the right track. Im assuming when your boss talks about no waste he means , the frozen wings wont go bad if you dont sell them in a timely manner, what i've seen lower volume restaurants do is get the largest wing size (jumbo), wash wings, par bake , strain juices, place on sheet pans and frozen individually, once froze, can be separated and portion to gallon bags, pulled and thawed when need or cook straight from frozen, there really is a lot of options.
    if you dont have a walkin freezer individually freezing is out, just transfer straight to desired container for freezing once strained.
    If getting rid of fresh wings in a timely manner isnt a issue, disregard that.
    I managed a tanners bar and grill for 2 years, they bought fresh jump wings , washed and fried, take about 15 to 20. Customers will usually wait 15-20 for fresh moist delicious wings. We did periodically have to toss wings due to slow periods.

    Always salt and pepper right out of fryer and then your preferred sauce
    I wouldn't toss on flat top, you will end up with a mess, since you dont have a grill, you can use a saute pan and saute the wings in (sweet Thai chili and basil leaves) example of one of my favorites or any sauce you like, watch yourself with sugary sauces, they will burn easily.

    if you dont use buffalo yet i suggest,
    1 gal franks red hot- cold, or room temp, large bowl, on side melt 4 sticks of butter, pour cold franks redhot and slowly whisk melted butter in, add a small amounts of white vinegar, Worcestershire, cayenne pepper, garlic powder to taste,
     
  18. Iceman

    Iceman

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    LOL. ... "on the right track". I've been cooking in bars for give or take 40 years. Thanks for backing me up there a little bit. I don't understand what all this partial cooking is all about. The first 10-minutes in the deep-fry and they're cooked ... fully cooked. Coming out of the freezer there is NO "thawing" or any other such stuff. Back in the deep-fry for 8-minutes and done and ready to go. We're talking chicken-wings here.

    "We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery.".
     
  19. someday

    someday

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    Considering all the shitty wings I've eaten in many different places, I don't think getting nitty gritty with details and methods is out of place.

    I don't understand why you'd cook for 10 mins, then freeze, then cook for 8 more minutes from frozen. What purpose does this serve other than cutting down 2 minutes on the pickup? Why not just cook 10 minutes from raw and send them out to the customer? Surely, if we have a choice, not freezing after cooking is better than freezing?
     
  20. Iceman

    Iceman

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    OK ... Well that says you've obviously never worked in a bar. There is NO place to put 40-lbs of raw wings anywhere in a bar kitchen. You can put them very simply bagged the freezer after they've been cooked. The difference in MY kitchen is minuscule between the fresh cooked and the cooked from frozen wings. Nobody has ever been unhappy and as I've said before ... NONE ever come back.

    Don't EVER confuse bar chx-wings with haut cuisine.


    "We work in kitchens ... It ain'te rocket surgery.".
     
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