Need to cover gross burn and slap pizzas

Discussion in 'Choosing A Culinary School' started by Elisabeth, Aug 24, 2018.

  1. Elisabeth

    Elisabeth

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    I seriously don't know shit about working in a real kitchen. Ive worked in a fast food pizza environment and the only reason I got my job at my awesome local pizza shop is because I can slap and topp very well. Problem is, I got the nastiest grease burn down my forearm and I don't know how to dress it for service as the dough will hit it while I'm slapping. Idk if I'm supposed to dress it a certain way or what.
     
  2. halb

    halb

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    That can be a problem because it sounds extensive. Open wounds and burns need to be covered until then begin to heal and close up. Probably what I would do is dress it and wrap it loosely with an ace bandage then wear a long sleeve something- maybe a chefs coat.
     
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  3. iridium12

    iridium12

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    I would buy some sleeves - I think amazon even sells them
    Over here - most shops that cater to restaurants carry them
    They are used primarily for our tattoed brothers and sisters to cover up when working in higher end venues and such where the guests might be "offended" by inked chef's (no idea why, but hey)

    You could try this: https://tat2x.com/pages/chefs-cover-tattoos
     
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  4. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    Burns are tricky business.
    Yours sounds bad enuf to take to a Doc in the Box.
    If not possible show a pharmacist...those guys are docs disguised as pill pushers lol.

    mimi
     
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  5. kronin323

    kronin323

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    And how nasty is that? Did it blister up? Lose any skin? Need to know to give the best answer.
     
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  6. iridium12

    iridium12

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    I have to ask - what is a "Doc in the Box"?
     
  7. halb

    halb

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    Urgent care.
     
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  8. iridium12

    iridium12

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    Thanks :)
     
  9. Elisabeth

    Elisabeth

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    If you just want the answer to your question skip to the last paragraph you sick freak. Haha I have included my treatment regimen in the paragraph below.

    The grease just came out of a 500% oven. It had no rest time. I did what you're told not to do and plunged it into freezing ice water. Of course, every time I took my arm out it started burning like hell. After doing that for about 4 hours I put ice in a bag, wrapped it with a wash towel and held it there. I applied tea tree oil and did a cold compress for the rest of the night until morning. Switching when the ice pack got too warm... I made suppositories in a silicon ice tray out of coconut and tea tree oil (kept solidified) that I use for everything and I would apply a generous amount all throughout the day.

    The burn only got one small blister initially and a lot of dark marks. I had a few delayed burn blisters. It was second degree. It spans my whole inside forearm. Now I have only 2 tiny marks to clear up and I attribute that to taking great care of it and using natural remedies....and maybe the melanin Gods haha. I now keep cocoa butter on it to clear up the remainder of the scarring. Burns heal best in a moist environment. Everyone is surprised it healed so quick and beautifully.
     
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  10. Elisabeth

    Elisabeth

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    Thanks everyone. I didn't want to wait around in an urgent care. I had to continue to work. The worst part was me dropping the cinnamon rolls. I researched what to do while I soaked my arm in a bucket of ice water then used natural instincts, patience, determination and natural remedies to heal it. (Description of process in earlier reply)

    The burns peeled away and revealed shiny nasty looking skin. It looked worse than it was. Skin was peeling off and sometimes customers stick their heads in the window to pay a compliment. I ended up using cvs brand water proof burn healing bandages for service and just changing it if I ever exited and came back into the kitchen. No one said anything. They were just happy I came.
     
  11. flipflopgirl

    flipflopgirl

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    @Elisabeth ... being a recovering health professional (a few decades working in different departments but mostly L&D and ER) it has taken a long time to get back to nature.
    Currently into tea tree oil and the bandades for different applications caught my attention last year.
    Did not know about the burn flavor and am particularly happy to hear about a store brand (cvs) that does not fall off 5 min after application.
    I don't fry very often (mostly seafood) but manage to somehow burn myself every time I do and have added cvs to my list of places to stop by next time I "go to town" so thanks for that.
    Liking the ice tray coconut thing.
    Do you have a recipe or do you just shoot from the hip?

    mimi